Page images
PDF
EPUB

gallons and will give a detention period of about 4 hours when Serving a population of 1,000 assuming a per capita rate of sewage contribution of iOo gallons a day which is the basis of design used. . The sludge compartment has a capacity of about 2,000 cubic feet. The tank is provided with an 8-inch sludge pipe by means of which the sludge may be Withdrawn and discharged to an adjacent sludge drying bed by gravity flow. The end of the sludge pipe is shown resting on the bottom of the tank. This does not appear to be a satisfactory arrangement and it would be better to support the pipe at a point about 8 inches above the bottom of the tank. The sludge valve is also so located that it would be liable to freeze unless properly protected.

It is proposed to facilitate the removal of the sludge by installing a 1-inch pressure line which extends to the bottom of the sludge hopper where it terminated in a perforated ring. It would be well also, and in fact more necessary, to add an additional perforated water pipe near the top of the sloping bottom of the sludge hopper where it joins the vertical wail of the tank. The pipe should also be increased to 1%-inch in diameter.

Sludge drying bed

The sludge drying bed is to be 25 feet long and 15 feet wide and is to be filled with filtering material consisting of a top layer of sand 10 inches thick overlying an 8-inch layer of gravel surrounding the underdrains. The effluent from the underdrains is to be discharged into the sprinkling filter. The total area of the bed is 375 square feet and should satisfactorily care for a population of 1,000 persons.

Dosing tank

The effluent from the settling tank is to be discharged through a 10-inch outlet pipe into a dosing tank located adjacent to the settling tank. This tank is to have a capacity of about 1,600 gallons and is to be equipped with a 10-inch automatic discharge siphon by means of which the sewage will be discharged intermittently into the distribution system of the sprinkling filter under a head of from 1% to 5 feet.

Sprinkling filter

The sprinkling filter which is to be constructed with concrete sides and a concrete floor, is to be 63 feet long by 36 feet wide giving a total area of .052 acres. It is to be filled to a depth of 5% feet with broken stone ranging from 1 inch to 1% inches in size. The distributing system is to consist of 2 main distributors each controlled by a gate valve in order to permit of cutting off the flow of either or both lines, 3-inch lateral distributors and 3-inch castiron riser pipes equipped with Taylor square spray nozzles, spaced 9 feet center to center. On the basis of design used the sprinkling filter will be required to operate at the rate of about 1,900,000 gallons per acre per day, equal to about 330,000 gallons per acre per day per foot of depth when serving a population of 1,000 persons. The underdrain system is to consist of a false floor of split hexagonal tiles which are to discharge into a main underdrain moulded in the concrete floor of the filter and extending longitudinally through it from one end to the other. The effluent pipe is to discharge into Ellicott creek near the plant. The average water level of the creek at this point is, according to the plans, 11% and maximum high water mark, 19%, which elevation is also the elevation of the bottom of the sprinkling filters so that the filter should not be back watered at times of high water.

Although I am of the opinion that it would be permissible at present to discharge sprinkling filter effluent into Ellicott creek at this time without further treatment, it will in all probability be necessary in the future to provide for a final settling tank to treat the sprinkling filter effluent and remove the solids which are given off from the sprinkling filters. Although the sludge deposited from sprinkling filter effluent is of a more stable character than the sludge from raw sewage it would in all probability create objectionable conditions in the stream when the population served by the disposal plant is materially increased. It appears that the necessity of future installation of a final settling tank has been anticipated by the designing engineer Inasmuch as the plans show that an area has been reserved for the construction of final settling tanks if necessary in the future.

Conclusions and recommendations

From our careful examination of plans it is found that although it would appear possible to so modify the plans as to materially reduce the amount of Sewage pumped and consequently the cost of maintenance the proposed sewerage and sewage disposal system should satisfactorily care for the sewage of the sewer district and if properly constructed and if maintained with care and efficiency should produce an effluent that may safely be discharged into Ellicott creek at this time without objection. It is probable, however, that it will be necessary in the future when the district is more fully developed to provide for additional or more complete treatment of the sewage such as final sedimentation or sterilization or both before its discharge into Ellicott creek.

I would therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be issued allowing the discharge of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant into Ellicott creek on condition that whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health plans for additional or supplementary treatment of the sewage shall be submitted for approval.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., February 13, 1917 Chief Engineer

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law " as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the town board of the town of Amherst to discharge effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant to be constructed in connection with the sewer system for sewer district No. 1, into the waters of Ellicott creek, at the point of discharge shown by the plans within the town of Amherst in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary. 2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State. 3. That no storm or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers. 4. That both the sewer system and the sewage disposal works shown by plans approved this day shall be fully constructed in complete conformity with such plans or approved amendments thereof. 5. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health detailed plans satisfactory to this Department for additional or more complete treatment of the sewage such as final sedimentation or sterilization or both shall be submitted to this Department for approval; and the works shown by said plans shall be constructed and put in operation at such time or times thereafter as said commissioner may designate.

LINSLY R. WILLIAMS, February 21, 1917 Acting State Commissioner of Health

AVON

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for proposed sewer extensions in the village of Avon, Livingston county, submitted to this Department for approval by the Sewer Commissioners of the village on October 23, 1917. The records of the Department show that original plans for a comprehensive sewer system for the village discharging into the Genesee river were approved by the then State Board of Health on December 14, 1894. These plans did not provide for any treatment of the sewage before its discharge into the Genesee river. Plans for extensions to this system were subsequently submitted and on March 4, 1912, plans for a sewage disposal plant consisting of a settling tank of the Imhoff type to be constructed at the first installation and a sprinkling filter for a more complete treatment of the sewage of the village to be constructed when required in the future, were approved. On May 22, 1912, amended plans for sewage disposal submitted in accordance with the requirements of the permit issued on March 4, 1912, were approved. The preliminary treatment works provided for by those plans were subsequently constructed and put in operation. The plans now submitted provide for some 650 feet of 8-inch sewer in Oak street and in Temple street south of Oak street, tributary to the existing 6-inch sewer in Oak street, which latter sewer discharged into the village sewage disposal plant. According to the report of the Designing Engineer there are at present four houses on Temple street south of Oak street and it is not considered probable by him that Temple street will be extended beyond the limits of the proposed sewer owing to the location of the deep ravine south of this point. The proposed sewer is to be constructed on a slope of .4 per cent and is to be provided with a flush tank at its upper end. Manholes are to be constructed at the intersection of Temple and Oak streets at the junction of the proposed sewer with existing sewer in Oak street and at a point midway between the upper and lower end of the sewer in Temple street. As noted above the proposed 8-inch sewer is to discharge into the existing 6-inch sewer in Oak street. It is not desirable to have a larger sewer discharge into a smaller size sewer inasmuch as there is a tendency to clog at the junction point. In this case, however, there does not appear to be sufficient fall available for a 6-inch sewer in Temple street and it is probable that no serious difficulty from clogging will occur provided care is taken in constructing the channel in the bottom of the junction manholes. From our careful examination of the plans it is found that the design of the proposed sewers is satisfactory in so far as sizes, capacities and facilities for cleaning and inspecting are concerned. I would, therefore, recommend that plans be approved and a permit be issued allowing the discharge of sewage from the proposed sewers into the Genesee river after such sewage shall first have been passed through the village sewage disposal plant.

Respectfully submitted, THEODORE HORTON, Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y. October 30, 1917

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law "as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the sewer commissioners of the village of Avon to discharge Sewage from the proposed sewer extensions in Temple and Oak streets into the waters of the Genesee river through the outlet of the sewage disposal plant within the municipality of Avon in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That only sanitary or domestic sewage, and no storm water or Surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers.

4. That all sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers shall first be passed through the sewage disposal works of the village of Avon before its discharge into the Genesee river.

- M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health October 31, 1917

BEDFORD HILLS (N. Y. State Reformatory for Women)

LINSLY R. WILLIAMS, M.D., Acting State Commissioner of Health :

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for additions and alterations to the sewage disposal plant at the New York State Reformatory for Women at Bedford Hills, submitted to this Department for appoval by the State Architect under section 14 of the Public Health Law, on March 8, 1917. These plans provide for the construction of an underdrain on the northerly side of the northwesterly sand filter; for an underdrain on the southerly side of the southwesterly sand filter; for a manhole at the upper end of each of the main underdrains of the sand filter; and for a new sump manhole or sand catcher above the chlorination plant. According to the plans and specifications the underdrains are to consist of 5-inch bell and spigot tile laid with open joints in trenches approximately 2 feet below grade. The underdrains are to be surrounded with broken stone or gravel and are to discharge into the manholes to be installed at the upper ends of the main drains of the sand filters. The sump manhole or sand catcher which is to be located a few feet above the chlorination plant is to be divided into 2 compartments and an outlet channel and the pipes connecting with this structure are to be provided with valves so arranged as to permit of using either or both compartments at the same time. Each compartment is to be 3 feet 8 inches long, 2% feet wide and 2 feet deep below the flow line. From our examination of the plans I am of the opinion that if properly carried out they should satisfactorily meet the requirements for which they were designed and I would therefore recommend that the plans be approved. Respectfully submitted, THEODORE HORTON, Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., March 14, 1917

The plans were approved March 14, 1917.
VOL. II — 2

BINGHAMTON

LINSLY R. WILLIAMS, M.D., Acting State Commissioner of Health :

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for proposed sewer extensions in the city of Binghamton, Broome county, submitted to this Department for approval by the city engineer on behalf of the Common Council on February 21, 1917.

The plans provide for a proposed sewer extension in Bradley street, between Fairview avenue and Glen avenue, and for proposed sewers in George street between Moeller street and Broad avenue, and between Ely street and the railroad.

The proposed sewer in Bradley street is to be 8 inches in diameter and is to be laid on a slope of .79 per cent. A manhole is to be placed at the upper end of the proposed sewer, at its intersection with the existing sewer in Fairview avenue, and at a point midway between Fairview avenue and Glen avenue. The proposed sewers in George street are also to be 8 inches in diameter and are to be laid on satisfactory slopes. Manholes are to be installed at all points of change of slope and alignment. The proposed sewers if properly constructed should satisfactorily meet the needs for which they were designed. *

The sewage to be collected by all the sewers is to be discharged into the Chenango river through the existing Susquehanna street outlet sewer at the foot of Susquehanna street. The sewage from this outlet is finally to be intercepted and conveyed to the sewage disposal plant to be constructed by the city.

In view of the above I would recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued allowing the temporary discharge of sanitary sewage from the proposed sewers into the Chenango river.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., February 24, 1917

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law,” as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Common Council of the city of Binghamton to discharge sewage from the proposed sewer extensions in Bradley street and George street into the waters of Chenango river at the foot of Susquehanna street, within the municipality of Binghamton, in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions: 1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary. 2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State. 3. That no storm or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers. 4. That this permit shall expire on October 1, 1917, unless this time shall be extended by the State Commissioner of Health. LINSLY R. WILLIAMS, Acting State Commissioner of Health

March 2, 1917

« PreviousContinue »