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N. Y., prepared by the Aten Sewage Disposal Co., and submitted to this Department for approval on October 1, 1917.

The school to be served by the proposed plant is located in a sparsely populated district on high ground about 234 miles south of Hempstead Harbor. The soil is a sandy loam, well drained, with the ground water level at a considerable distance below the surface. According to the engineer's report, the seating capacity in the school is 140, and the water consumption approximates 1,700 gallons per day. The water supply is taken entirely from the town mains.

The proposed plant comprises a settling tank, dosing chamber and subsurface irrigation field. The sewage will be conducted from the building to the settling tank by a 4-inch tile sewer about 200 feet long. From the settling tank it will flow into the adjacent dosing chamber, and from these be discharged into the subsurface irrigation field.

The settling tank consists of a circular concrete tank located below the surface of the ground having a capacity of about 1,700 gallons giving an average detention period of 24 hours. The inlet and outlet pipes are located at opposite ends of the tank and are turned down about 2 feet below the normal water level.

The dosing chamber immediately adjacent to the settling tank is of similar construction except that it is fitted with a siphon and has a capacity of only 300 gallons. Assuming that the entire flow from the school reaches the tank în 8 hours this chamber will discharge on an average of every 35 minutes during the day. An overflow pipe is provided in the chamber connected to the discharge pipe just below the siphon.

The disposal field is divided into 2 sections 'either of which may be 'used at the will of the attendant, a diverting gate being provided, just below the dosing chamber by which he can turn the flow into either section. Each field comprises 8 rows of double 4-inch tile about 125 feet long and 8 feet apart laid at a depth of 18 inches below the surface on a grade of 2 inches per 100 feet. The total length of tile is 2,000 feet or 14 feet per capita. The tile is to be laid with open joints protected by tar paper.

The plans indicate that the minimum grade for sewers connected with the plant will be 18 inch per foot. This is a little flatter than desirable for 4-inch tile pipe carrying raw sewage. If possible the line from the school to the plant should be laid on a grade of not less than 14 inch per foot.

In view of the results of our examination of these plans and a careful study of the local requirements, I beg to recommend that the plans be approved on the condition that the sewer from the building to the tank be laid with a fall of not less than 14 inch per foot.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y.. October 4, 1917

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PERMIT Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 76 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “ Public Health Law as amended by chapter 558 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Board of Trustees of the East Williston School to discharge effluent from the proposed sewage disposal works for the school into the waters of the State tributary to Hempstead Bay and its tributaries within the town of North Hempstead in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That both the sewer and the sewage disposal works shown by plans approved this day shall be fully constructed in complete conformity with such plans or approved amendments thereof except as provided in condition 4 of this permit.

4. That the gradient of the sewer from the school house to the disposal plant shall be increased to at least 2 per cent.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health October 5, 1917

NORTH HEMPSTEAD (J. J. Murphy) HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for sewage disposal for the property of Mr. J. J. Murphy at Great Neck, town of North Hempstead, L. I., resubmitted to this Department for approval on March 23, 1917.

These plans were first submitted for approval on March 15, 1917. It is found from our preliminary examination of the plans that they were not in satisfactory condition for approval and were, therefore, returned to the designing engineers for modifications. Our examination of the plans now submitted shows that they have been modified in general as recommended.

According to the data submitted with the plans a population of 3 persons is to be cared for. The sewage disposal plant is to consist of a settling tank, dosing tank, and an underdrain subsurface irrigation system. The settling tank is to be a covered reinforced concrete tank provided with 2 manhole openings. It is to be 6 feet long 31/2 feet wide and from 41/2 to 5 feet deep. It will have a capacity of about 750 gallons equal to about 2 days detention of the sewage, assuming a daily per capita rate of sewage contribution of 100 gallons. The dosing tank is to be 2 feet long 312 feet wide and is to be provided with an alternating discharge siphon by means of which the effluent from the settling tank is to discharge intermittently into the distributing system of the subsurface irrigation field. The dosing tank has a capacity öf about 712 cubic feet and will, therefore, fill the 4-inch distributing system at each discharge of the siphon.

The subsurface irrigation systein is to be located in an excavated area 13 feet wide by 20 feet long. The distributing system is to consist of 3 lines of 4-inch tile 20 feet long each laid with open joints and surrounded with gravel at a depth of about 2 feet below the ground. An underdrained system consisting of 2 lines of underdrains is to be placed at a depth of 3 feet below the distributing system. The filtering material below the distributing system is to consist of 3 feet of mortar sand. The underdrain system is to extend for a distance of 125 feet along and near the steep bank of Long Island Sound opposite the property. This line, however, should be kept at a distance of not less than 20 feet from the top of the bank. The rate of operation of the subsurface irrigation system will be about 50,000 gallons per acre per day on the basis of design used.

From our careful examination of the plans I am of the opinion that the proposed disposal plant should satisfactorily meet the requirements for which it was designed and I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved on condition that no part of the underdrain system from the plant shall be located less than 20 feet from the shore of Long Island Sound.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., March 26, 1917

Chief Engineer

The plans were approved March 28, 1917.

NORWICH

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on an examination of plans for a proposed sewer extension in Berry street in the city of Norwich, Chenango county, N. Y., submitted to this Department for approval by the Common Council of the city on October 26, 1917.

Plans for a comprehensive system of sewers for the village of Norwich were approved by this Department on November 18, 1892. These plans covered all developed portions of the village and provided for the discharge of the sanitary sewage of the village into the Chenango river at the foot of Birdsall street. On April 11, 1906, amended plans showing an additional outlet into the river at the foot of Grove avenue were approved by this Department; and on April 27, 1914, plans providing for still another outlet at the foot of Gold street were approved. It was pointed out to the village authorities at the time of the approval of the last mentioned set of plans, that proper provision should be made by the city for the concentration of its sewage at one point if possible, and for the disposal of such sewage by at least partial treatment.

On June 16, 1915, plans for certain extensions to the sewers in the city to be built in Prospect and Gold streets were approved by this Department. Our report on the examination of these plans discussed the matter of the disposal of the sewage of the city, and pointed out why steps should be taken to provide for at least preliminary treatment of the sewage. The permit issued in connection with the approval of these plans for the discharge of sewage from the proposed extensions into the Chenango river contained the following condition:

“ That on or before October 1, 1916, satisfactory detailed plans for preliminary treatment of the entire sanitary sewage of the city of Norwich by sedimentation accompanied by general plans for additional or supplementary works for more complete treatment of the sewage of the city shall be submitted to this Department for approval and that after approval of said plans such works for preliminary treatment of the sewage shall be constructed and put in operation whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health.'

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Since that date, plans for extensions to the sewerage system of the city have been approved by this Department and in each case the permit issued in connection with the approval of the plans contained the condition quoted above. The dates on which these permits were issued are August 11, 1915; September 15, 1915, and July 25, 1916.

The detailed plans for a sewage disposal works for the city required by the conditions of the above mentioned permits have not been submitted to this Department for approval; and the common council of the city by a resolution passed on October 23, 1917, now requests that the time for the submission of such plans be extended, stating that

** they believe it impossible to raise the required funds for the purpose as the city is now bonded for very near its limit of bonded indebtedness, and the amount permitted by the charter to be raised each year by taxation is nearly used up in paying the now existing obligations of

the city and its normal running expenses.” The plans under consideration at present contemplate the construction of an 8-inch lateral sewer 250 feet long.in Berry street east of Silver street. The grade of the proposed lateral is given on the plans as 0.2 per cent. The upper end of the line is provided with a manhole. This proposed grade is too flat to give a satisfactory self-cleansing velocity, and it would seem desirable to increase the grade to not less than 0.35 per cent. If, however, it is not possible to do this and keep the elevations low enough to admit of future extensions the grade should be increased to at least 0.25 per cent and a flush tank instead of a manhole provided at the upper end of the line. In view of the above, I would recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued for the discharge of the sewage from the proposed extension into the Chenango river through the existing outfall sewer in Birdsall street in the city of Norwich with the condition that the grade of the sewer be increased to 0.25 per cent and adequate flushing facilities provided.

I would further recommend that the time for the submission of satisfactory detailed plans for the preliminary treatment of the entire sanitary sewage of the city by sedimentation and general plans for additional or supplementary works for more complete treatment of the sewage of the city be extended from October 1, 1916, to October 1, 1918.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., November 8, 1917

Chief Engineer

PERMIT Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the "Public Health Law,” as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the common council of the city of Norwich to discharge sewage from the proposed sewer extension in Berry street into the waters of the Chenango river at the foot of Birdsall street extended, within the municipality of Norwich, in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That only sanitary or domestic sewage, and no storm water or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers.

4. That the slope of the proposed sewer shall be increased to not less than 35 per cent or that the slope of the sewer shall be increased to at least .25 per cent and a flush tank instead of a manhole be provided at the upper end of the sewer.

5. That on or before October 1, 1918, satisfactory detailed plans for preliminary treatment of the entire sanitary sewage of the city of Norwich by sedimentation accompanied by general plans for additional or supplementary works for more complete treatment of the sewage of the city shall be submitted to this Department for approval; and that after approval of said plans such works for preliminary treatment of the sewage shall be constructed and put in operation whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health Novenber 10, 1917

ORISKANY

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health :

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for modifications of portions of the sewer system in the village of Oriskany,

Oneida county, submitted to this Department by the board of trustees on June 8, 1917.

Original plans for a comprehensive sanitary sewer system and for a sewage disposal plant for this village were approved on February 24, 1916, and reference is made to our report dated February 16, 1916, on our examination of these plans for a description of the village and of the sewerage and sewage disposal systems.

Plans now submitted provide for changes of alignment of the sewers in the village near Utica, River and Orchard streets. It appears from the data submitted with the plans that the proposed changes in the alignment of the sewers are to be made owing to the difficulty in obtaining rights of way through private properties through which the sewers, as originally planned, were to be constructed. The proposed changes provide for detours and do not impair the efficiency of the system. In one case it appears that the proposed changes will necessitate the construction of a longer lateral house sewer than would have been necessary had the original plans been carried out. This, however, should not offer any serious difficulty. The size and slopes of the proposed sewers are to be practically the same as originally planned.

In view of the above I would recommend that the plans be approved. It should not be necessary, however, to issue a permit in connection with the approval of these plans inasmuch as they do not provide for any additional discharge of sewage than that contemplated by the original plans.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., Jron e 22, 1917

The plans were approved June 22, 1917.

OTSEGO COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on an examination of the plans for water supply and sewage disposal for the Otsego County Tuberculosis Hospital, submitted to this Department for approval by the architect on October 14, 1917.

The site of the hospital is in the town of Laurens about 11/2 miles southwest of the Mount Vision station of the Otsego and Herkimer Electric Railway, and about 10 miles north of the city of Oneonta. The area of the grounds is approximately 20 acres located on the southerly slope of a hill. The soil is a gravel and loam over shale rock.

Water supply It is proposed to obtain the water supply for the institution by the development of 2 springs located in the upper part of the property about 1,000 feet from and 100 feet above the building. The area above the springs is sparsely populated, and the quality of the water should be satisfactory from a sanitary standpoint. No measurement has been made of the flow from the springs, but the quantity is estimated at from 10 to 15 gallons per minute, and is said to be nearly constant throughout the year. According to the plans a shallow well or basin about 5 feet square and 4 feet deep will be excavated at the springs to collect the water. This basin has a floor of loose broken stone. The walls are of concrete, the rear wall being perforated with 2-inch holes, 6 inches on centers to permit the entrance of the water. Broken stone and gravel will be filled in behind the perforated wall to prevent the entrance

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