Page images
PDF
EPUB

Regulation 2-a. Reporting cases of persons bitten by a rabid animal. It shall be the duty of every physician or other person to report to the local health officer within whose jurisdiction such person is, the full name, age and address of every person who has been bitten (a) by a rabid animal, (b) by an animal suspected of being rabid, within twenty-four hours from the time when such fact comes to his knowledge.

It shall be the duty of the health officer to transmit promptly these reports to the state department of health.

Regulation 8. Reporting cases of communicable disease on dairy farms by physicians. When a case of Asiatic cholera, diphtheria, amoebic or bacillary dysentery, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, epidemic or septic sore throat, para-typhoid fever, poliomyelitis, acute anterior, scarlet fever, smallpox or typhoid fever exists on any farm or dairy producing milk, cream, butter, or other dairy products for sale, it shall be the duty of the physician in attendance to report immediately to the local health officer the existence on such farm or dairy of such case.

It shall be the duty of the health officer to report immediately to the state commissioner of health, by telephone or telegram, the existence on such farm or dairy of such case, together with all facts as to the isolation of such case, and giving the names of the localities to which such dairy products are delivered.

This regulation as amended shall take effect throughout the State of New York, except in the city of New York, on June 1, 1917. Regulation 12. Adults not to be quarantined in certain

When a person affected with a communicable disease is properly isolated on the premises, except in cases of smallpox, adult members of the family or household, who do not come in contact with the patient or with his secretions or excretions, unless forbidden by the health officer, may continue their usual vocations, provided such vocations do not bring them in close contact with children, nor require that they handle food or food products intended for sale. Regulation 13.

Removal of cases of communicable disease. After isolation by the local health officer no person, without permission from him, shall carry, remove or cause or permit to be

cases.

carried or removed from any room, building, or vessel any person affected with diphtheria, scarlet fever, smallpox or typhus fever.

Without permission from the local health officer no person shall carry, remove, or cause or permit to be carried or removed from or to any hotel, boarding house, lodging house, or other dwelling, any person affected with chickenpox, diphtheria, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, epidemic or septic sore throat, measles, mumps, poliomyelitis (infantile paralysis), scarlet fever, smallpox, typhus fever, or whooping cough.

Without permission from the local health officer no master of any vessel or other person shall remove or aid in removing, or permit the removal, from any such vessel to the shore, of any person affected with any communicable disease.

This regulation shall not apply to any vessel within the jurisdiction of the health officer of the port of New York.

Regulations 2-a, 8, 12 and 13 took effect June 1, 1917.

Regulation 14. Removal of articles. contaminated with infective material. Without instruction from the health oficer no person shall carry, remove or cause or permit to be carried or removed from any room, building, or vessel, any article which has been subject to contamination with infective material through contact with any person or with the secretions of any persons affected with Asiatic cholera, diphtheria, scarlet fever, smallpox, typhoid fever or typhus fever, until such article has been disinfected according to the special rules and regulations of the state department of health.

Without permission of the health officer no master of any vessel or other person shall remove or aid in removing or permit the removal from any such vessel to the shore of any article which has been subject to contamination with infective material through contact with any person or with the secretions of any person affected with Asiatic cholera, diphtheria, scarlet fever, smallpox, typhoid fever, or typhus fever.

This regulation shall not apply.to any vessel within the jurisdiction of the health officer of the port of New York.

Regulation 22. Preventing the spread of communicable diseases in institutions. It shall be the duty of the superintendent or person in charge of any hospital, or other institution, or dis

pensary, in which there is a person affected with any communicable disease, to take such steps as will, so far as practicable, prevent the spread of infection and trace its original source.

Regulations 14 and 22 as amended took effect July 14, 1917.

Regulation 29-a. Chancroid, gonorrhoea and syphilis. Chancroid, gonorrhoea and syphilis are hereby declared to be infectious and communicable diseases highly dangerous to the public health.

It shall be the duty of every physician when first attending a person affected with chancroid, gonorrhoea or syphilis to fumish to said person a circular of information issued or approved by the state commissioner of health and to instruct such person as to the precautions to be taken in order to prevent the communication of the disease to others.

This regulation took effect June 1, 1917.

Regulation 29-b. Records of venereal diseases not to be divulged. The records of the State Department of Health, or of any local department or local officer, in reference to cases of chancroid, gonorrhoea and syphilis, shall not be divulged or made public so as to disclose the identity of the persons to whom they relate by any person, except insofar as may be authorized by the public health council.

Regulation 32. Removal to hospital or isolation and restriction of visiting in certain cases. It shall be the duty of the health officer to remove, or cause to be removed, every case of diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, or poliomyelitis, acute anterior (infantile paralysis) promptly to a suitable hospital, or to see that such case is properly isolated. Such isolation shall be maintained until its discontinuance is permitted by the health officer.

No person, except the physician and the nurse or other person in attendance, shall be permitted to come in contact with or to visit a case of diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, or poliomyelitis, acute anterior (infantile paralysis), except by permission of the health officer.

Regulation 34. Quarantine in certain emergencies. When any case of diphtheria, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, measles, scarlet fever, smallpox, poliomyelitis, acute anterior (infantile paralysis), or typhus ferer is not or cannot be properly isolated on the premises and cannot be removed to a suitable hospital, it shall be the duty of the local health officer to forbid any member of the household from leaving the premises, except under such conditions as he may specify and except as provided by regulation twelve of this chapter.

Regulation 35. Maximum period of incubation. For the purpose of this code, the maximum period of incubation (that is, between the date of the exposure to disease and the date of its development), of the following communicable diseases is hereby declared to be as follows:

21 days 14 days 21 days

anterior

(infantile

Chickenpox
Measles.
Mumps .
Poliomyelitis, acute

paralysis)
Scarlet fever.
Smallpox .
Whooping cough.

14 days

7 days 20 days 14 days

Regulation 36. Minimum period of isolation. The minimum period of isolation, within the meaning of this code, shall be as follows:

Chickenpox, until twelve days after the appearance of the eruption and until the crusts have fallen and the scars are completely healed.

Diphtheria (membranous croup), until two successive negative cultures have been obtained from the nose and throat at intervals of not less than twenty-four hours, the first of such cultures being taken not less than nine days from the day of the onset of the disease.

Measles, until seven days after the appearance of the rash and until all discharges from the nose, ears and throat have disappeared and until the cough has ceased.

Mumps, until two weeks after the appearance of the disease and one week after the disappearance of the swelling.

Poliomyelitis, acute anterior (infantile paralysis), until three weeks from the day of the onset of the disease.

Scarlet fever, until thirty days after the development of the disease and until all discharges from the nose, ears and throat, or suppurating glands have ceased.

Smallpox, until fourteen days after the development of the disease and until scabs have all separated and the scars completely healed.

Whooping cough, until eight weeks after the development of the disease or until one week after the last characteristic cough. Regulation 37.

Sale of foods forbidden in certain cases. When a case of diphtheria, epidemic or septic sore throat, amoebic or bacillary dysentery, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, scarlet fever, smallpox, poliomyelitis, acute anterior (infantile paralysis), or typhoid fever exists on any farm or dairy producing milk, cream, butter, cheese, or other foods likely to be consumed raw, no such foods shall be sold or delivered from such farm or dairy, except under the following conditions:

(a) That such foods are not brought into the house where such case exists;

(b) That all persons coming in contact with such foods eat, sleep and work wholly outside such house;

(c) That such persons do not come in contact in any way with such house or its inmates or contents;

(d) That said inmates are properly isolated and separated from all other parts of said farm or dairy, and efficiently cared for; and

(e) That a permit be issued by the health officer.

Regulation 38. Destruction of foods in certain cases. When a case of diphtheria, epidemic or septic sore throat, amoebic or bacillary dysentery, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, scarlet fever, smallpox, poliomyelitis, acute anterior (infantile paralysis), typhoid fever exists on any farm or dairy producing milk, cream, butter, cheese, or other foods likely to be consumed raw, the state commissioner of health or the local health officer may destroy or order the destruction of any such foods which in his opinion may have been so contaminated as to be a source of danger.

Regulation 39. Handling of food forbidden in certain cases. No person affected with any communicable disease shall handle food or food products intended for sale, which are likely to be consumed raw or liable to convey infective material.

No person who resides, boards, or lodges in a household where he comes in contact with any person affected with bacillary

« PreviousContinue »