Recreations of a Recluse, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1870

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Page 237 - A snake's small eye blinks dull and shy, And the lady's eyes they shrunk in her head, Each shrunk up to a serpent's eye, And with somewhat of malice, and more of dread, At Christabel she looked askance!
Page 34 - Go, hang yourselves all ! you are idle, shallow things : I am not of your element : you shall know more hereafter. [Exit. Sir To. Is't possible ? Fab. If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.
Page 287 - Thou hast nor youth, nor age ; But, as it were, an after-dinner's sleep, Dreaming on both: for all thy blessed youth Becomes as aged, and doth beg the alms Of palsied eld ; and when thou art old, and rich, Thou hast neither heat, affection, limb, nor beauty, To make thy riches pleasant. What's yet in this, That bears the name of life? Yet in this life Lie hid more thousand deaths: yet death we fear, That makes these odds all even.
Page 251 - Of sun and moon, and that the affrighted globe Should yawn at alteration.
Page 50 - ll bet you millions, milliards — It all sprung from a harmless game at billiards. ci. 'T is strange — but true ; for truth is always strange ; Stranger than fiction : if it could be told, How much would novels gain by the exchange ; How differently the world would men behold ! How oft would vice and virtue places change ! The new world would be nothing to the old, If some Columbus of the moral seas Would show mankind their souls
Page 35 - How now, Horatio? you tremble and look pale; Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes.
Page 76 - But what my power might else exact, — like one Who having unto truth, by telling of it, Made such a sinner of his memory, To credit his own lie...
Page 139 - Action is transitory — a step, a blow, The motion of a muscle — this way or that — 'Tis done, and in the after-vacancy We wonder at ourselves like men betrayed : Suffering is permanent, obscure and dark, And shares the nature of infinity.
Page 145 - Sanchez of Segovia, and made the same inquiry. By the time the latter had ascended the round-house, the light had disappeared. They saw it once or twice afterwards in sudden and passing gleams, as if it were a torch in the bark of a fisherman, rising and sinking with the waves...
Page 256 - ... Flow, softly flow, by lawn and lea, A rivulet then a river : No where by thee my steps shall be, For ever and for ever. But here will sigh thine alder tree, And here thine aspen shiver ; And here by thee will hum the bee, For ever and for ever. A thousand suns will stream on thee, A thousand moons will quiver ; But not by thee my steps shall be, For ever and for ever.

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