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New Code Reading Books.

ADAPTED TO THE

5TH AND OTH STANDARDS.

LESSONS IN ENGLISH HISTORY,
NATURAL HISTORY, SANITARY KNOWLEDGE,

SCIENCE, SOCIAL ECONOMY, ETC.
WITH POETICAL SELECTIONS FROM COWPER,
LONGFELLOW, SIR WALTER SCOTT, AND

SHAKESPEARE.

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LONDON:
JARROLD & SONS, 3, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS.

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243

Mercy

242 Hubert and Arthur

246

Benefits of Affliction

242 Antony's Oration over Cæsar's Body 249

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. -THE METRIC SYSTEM.

ARITHMETICAL EXERCISES.

LESSON 1.-ANCIENT BRITONS. Ancestors-forefathers (Latin ante, be- Cavalry-horse soldiers. fore; cedo, I go).

Precipitous—exceedingly steep. Assassinated-treacherously murdered. Agriculture—the art and practice of husCivilized-polished, as people in society bandry or tillage (Lat. ager, a field;

should be (Lat. civis, a citizen; ize, cultura, cultivation, from colo, I till). verbal termination).

The people who lived in England two thousand years ago are known as the Ancient Britons.

As you would expect, they were widely different in habits and character from the present inhabitants of our country, and were more like the savage natives of the South Sea Islands than the well-clothed, well-fed, civilized, and Christian Englishman.

But as the Ancient Britons are our ancestors in part, we cannot but be interested in their history. We are obliged to confess that they were savages, but we dwell with pleasure on the accounts of their bravery and courage; and when we read of foreigners invading them, we are glad to read that the Britons made a gallant resistance, and gave the invaders much trouble before they were finally subdued. We feel, indeed, that our own character is involved in that of our forefathers.

All our knowledge of the Ancient- Britons is obtained from foreigners. At the time we are speaking of, the civilised nations of the world lived around the Mediterranean Sea, and very little was known of the regions beyond. But merchants used to come to the south of Britain, to what is now Cornwall and the Scilly Islands, and the neighbourhood, in order to get tin from the Cassiterides, or Tin Islands, as they were called. Yet these merchants, who were anxious to keep their profits to themselves, were unwilling to let it be known where they went to obtain their cargoes, and there was only a general idea that there were Tin Islands somewhere READING LESSONS IN SOCIAL I,

BENJAMIN TEMPLAR. Shewing what to get on in Life; the Effects of Stri?

chinery, etc., etc. Second Edition, is., READING LESSONS IN POETRY

British, and other Schools. Cloth limp,
A CHAIN OF HISTORY. By S.

Second Edition, Is. 6d.
ONE THOUSAND QUESTIONS

TESTAMENT. With Explanator
each Book, and a concise History of
Close of the Old Testament Canon

Saviour. New Edition, 9d.; cloth, 1:. ONE THOUSAND QUESTIONS

TESTAMENT. Uniform with O!' tions; and a Sketch of the Christia

Edition, 9d.; cloth, is. Key, 9d. EASY BIBLE LESSONS WITH QL

the Use of Pupil Teachers, and the Te.

Classes in Sunday Schools. Cloth lin BARLOW'S ASTRONOMY SIMI.

stiff cover, 9d. ALLISON'S FIRST LESSONS IN

For the use of the Nursery and Juni thousand. Revised to 1868. Stiff

boards, is. BOND'S CHILD'S QUESTION BOOK KNOWLEDGE. 16th Edition, 18mo,

cloth, Is. CHILD'S PATHWAY THROUGH TE

OF ENGLAND, in Question and Answer THINGS OF EVERY DAY USE; WI Where they come from, and How they are m

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De them all. Those who dwell inland do not sow corn,

t live on milk and flesh, and are clothed with skins. ut all the Britons paint themselves with woad, which ives a blue colour, and on this account they are the ore dreadful in appearance in battle. They have ng hair, and shave all parts of the body except the ad and upper lip.” ** This is their method of fighting from chariots. At ist they drive them in all directions, and throw their ats, and often break the ranks of their enemies by the

y terror of their horses and noise of the wheels; and Huen they have introduced themselves between the anks of the cavalry, they leap from their chariots, and cht on foot. Mean while the chariot-drivers retire a ile from the combat, and so place themselves, that if eir warriors are overpowered by the number of the umy, they may rapidly retreat to their own men.

they have the rapidity of cavalry and the stability of fantry in engagements, and are so skilful from daily

and exercise, that they are accustomed to stop their ses at full speed on sloping and precipitous ground, d rein them in and turn them in brief space, and to run ng the pole, and stand on the yoke, and again betake mselves into the chariot with the greatest quickness.”. the chariots that Cæsar speaks of had sharp scythes tened to the axles of the wheels, which would do oh damage among the ranks of their enemies. It appears that the country was possessed by as many forty different tribes, and that there were frequent 18 among them. This made it easier for the Romans Drwards to conquer the whole country. The houses that Cæsar mentions seem to have been and buildings of wood; and a number of the houses ed together, and sometimes surrounded with a ditch

a wooden palisade, made a town. the people in the south of the country cultivated

round, and used the corn that they grew for food; griculture was not practised elsewhere.

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