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Industrial Schools for the Working classes.' (Rivingtons.) Boarding-schools for the poor, and a poll-tax to support them, are its suggestions.

Reform your Arches : The Course of Law Ecclesiastical, illustrated.' By Edward Dodd, B.D., (Vincent,) really contains some important matter, hidden and deserving to be lost because huddled up in the most grotesque language and absurd manner and style which has fallen in our way since the days of Mr. Prebendary Dennis.

Poems by Archer Gurney: Spring,' (Bosworth,) is a volume containing a great quantity of verse for its price, which we observe is remarkably low. We hardly know what other aspect of this work to select, for its author 'pitches into' all reviewers, critics, and opinions, past, present, and future, expressed or to be expressed on his poems, with such headlong ferocity that we really dare not offer an opinion on Mr. Gurney's powers. With his decided judgment on all writers who do not give their names in their reviews we are only surprised that we should have been favoured with a copy of Mr. Gurney's ' Poems.'

• Theological Colleges and the Universities,' by Mr. Hebert, of Burslem, (Burslem: Bowering,) under the form of a plea for new Theological Colleges, is, in fact, an attack upon those already existing.

• The Life of Mrs. Godolphin,' (Pickering,) so well known and valued, we find in an abridged and cheap form for distribution.

• Meditations for a Week on the Lord's Prayer,' (J. H. Parker,) are piously composed, but appear to mix up the notion of prayer-or rather aspiration-with that of meditation,

Mr. Bolton's Hulsean Prize Essay on the Patristic Evidences of Christianity,' (Macmillan,) is a very creditable manual, and deserves to become a text-book on the subject.

Mr. Mayor's edition of Juvenal, (Macmillan,) exhibits sound and exten. sive scholarship: a subject on which the Editor, judging from a sensible preface, containing some important strictures on the present state of classical learning in the Universities, has bestowed much pains.

Mr. Maurice's Theological Essays,' (Macmillan,) it would be unfair, indeed unjust, to characterise in one of these paragraphs. But we can say of them, that they exhibit much of the writer's beauties, ingenuity, paradox, and illustration, together with some matters on which we should seriously differ from him.

• Birch Church,' (Masters,) is a religious work, in the form of a dialogue, 'a narrative incidental and conversational.' It is a resumé of the disputes and difficulties, moral and theological, of the times, displayed in the form of a fiction-a region of literature about which our opinion has been so often expressed that we shall not repeat it.

Mr. Neale's Church History for Children,' (Mozley,) is composed with all the writer's glowing and engaging style. But we must say distinctly, that the quiet unhesitating way in which the most questionable of later miracles are assumed, puzzles us. In such a work we want neither criticism nor discussion; but the results of either are not out of place in the simplest of narratives.

Something of the same sort of objection attends some portions of Mr. G. W. Cox's interesting Life of S. Boniface,'(Masters) which appears to be in form and style intended to range with the Lives of the English Saints,' published some years ago.

Two exceedingly interesting Manuals have reached us from that publisher of pleasant books, Mr. Van Voorst-Mr. Goss' `Naturalist's Rambles on the Devonshire Coast,' and Dr. Cocks' practical "Sea-Weed Collector's Guide.' Mr. Goss is a favourable instance of the genial temper and warm sympathetic mind which the study of natural objects has, under good circumstances, a tendency to produce. But, beside his amiable moral tone, we can speak well of Mr. Goss's scientific attainments; he seems at home on all subjects-ornithology, as his Jamaica volume shows; in shells, sea. weed, sea-animals, and especially in a keen sense of natural scenery, which ke has great powers in describing.

• The Correspondence between Archdeacon Denison and Bishop Spenser,' (Rivingtons,) and a 'Supplement,' (Masters,) is not a little painful, we should say; not that the Archdeacon is not in some of his statements (for we cannot exactly reconcile all that he has written) quite right; nor should we say that the Bishop means to be wrong. But there is a good deal of precipitate language, and more precipitate action, which we deplore. And the challenge to refer the subject-and such a subject-to the Privy Council, was one for an individual to make in haste, and for the Church to deplore at leisure. However, from all that we can learn, there is no likelihood of things coming to this deplorable result.

We have in type an article on · Archdeacon Wilberforce's recent work on the Eucharist' (Mozley.)

The Bishop of Brechin's adaptation of • Arvisené's Memoriale Vitæ Sacerdotalis,’ (Masters) we recommend highly. It is deep and religious, without fanaticism; and the author has, in many respects, affinities to ourselves, from his date and country, which render his work not only a beautiful picture, but a useful manual.

The number of new Forms of Family Prayer is, on the one side, a hopeful sign; but their needless multiplicity betrays a restlessness with which we cannot feel satisfied. So is it with other devotional works; there is no call to bring out a whole crop of such manuals, because it is the publisbing season. We have no particular fault to find with the following, but we may say that we have seen as good books, and according to the taste of each writer, which varies considerably, as good fulfilments of his own religious type and sentiment. 1. • Book of Family Prayers, by the Sacrist of Durham,' (Pickering.) 2. • The Householder's Manual of Family Prayer,' by Mr. Thornton, of Dodford, (Pickering.) 3. “Book of Family Prayers,' by a Layman, (Masters.) 4. “Daily Prayers for Priest and People, (Masters.)

We prefer to the above the short and useful “Prayers for the Sick and Dying,' by the authoress, herself trained in sorrows; of Sickness, its Trials, and Blessings,' (Rivingtons ;) and a Manual for Mourners,' (Masters,) which has a practical Preface.

• For ne'er shall rest the sceptre wrong

Upon the righteous lot;
That to iniquity the just

Their bands put forth may not.
Do good, O LORD, unto the good

And the upright in heart.
But those, who to their crooked ways

Are prone aside to start,
• The LORD shall lead them forth to share

The lot of doers-ill;
Peace-everlasting, perfect peace

Shall be on Israel.' Never was such unfortunate skill as that which has introduced the donkey into the sweetest and most familiar song of Sion. Psalm xlii. thus begins :

• As brays the hart for water-brooks,

In deserts parch'd and dry.' If laymen, or clergymen either, find that time hangs heavy on their hands, we wish they would exhaust their powers of 'verse' in turning Nursery Rhymes into Greek Tetrameters instead of reducing the Psalms of David into nonsense and insipid profanity.

The Problem, "What is the Church ? solved, or, a Counter Theory,' (J. H. Parker,) is a work of considerable ingenuity and grasp of purpose. It is a reply to Mr. Newman's work on Development, and its main argument is to show that the gift of unity being withdrawn reduces the whole Christian Church to the dislocated state of the first Church after its return from the captivity. This thesis the author treats with considerable fulness, and in an affectionate tone. The book is considerably above the average; and we hope to devote a further examination to it, and at greater length. But in the meantime we desire at once both to announce and to speak in commendation of a volume which, with large historical resources, proposes a view, not perhaps quite so original as the writer seems to think, but which has breadth and completeness to recommend it.

· Foreign Chaplaincies. Three Letters addressed to the Lord Bishop of London on the necessity of Mission, from the Congregation in Madeira,' (Hope,) is important chiefly as completing the pièces justificatives of a very curious and distressing incident in our ecclesiastical annals. On the one hand has been displayed an edifying perseverance, considerable learning, and a resolute and enduring assertion of principle; on the other, if, as is now shown, the protest and contest for the Bishop of London's authority was always disavowed by the authority most concerned, one's only surprise is that Mr. Lowe and his friends were permitted to fight the Church's battle on grounds not really claimed. We think the present aspect of the case ought to have been visible years ago. One thing, however, remains, that if Mr. Lowe could never claim mission, Mr. Brown has none. Mr. Hosmer has argued his case with great fulness, dexterity, and literature.

The Education Question has produced a crop of pamphlets; in which the straw somewhat predominates over the wheat. Here is but a specimen of the publications which have reached us. 1. • Church

Questions in 1853. A Charge by Archdeacon Sinclair.' (Rivingtons.) Mr. Sinclair has a right to speak on this subject, not only from his former connexion with the National Society, but upon personal grounds. He knows what he is writing about when he discusses the management clauses and the minutes of council. But for some reason or other the Vicar of Kensington does not attract confidence; and we observe that in this pamphlet be speaks of the Cassandran fate which has attended many of his warnings. In what he says of the tenth clause of the Government measure we entirely coincide; and we suspect that a rate school will supersede voluntary schools. The danger, however, is not in the mode of support but of management; if the latter is left free we care not for the method of payment. 2. •The Catechism of the Church of England the basis of all teaching in Parisb-schools,' a Charge by Archdeacon Denison, (Masters,) consists for the most part of a review of Sir J. K. Shuttleworth's recent work. In tracing the influence of this personage on the proceedings of the committee of Council we suspect Archdeacon Denison to be right. Certainly his fine Italian hand is traceable in this mischievous tenth clause of the Government measure; and if, as seems probable, the whole bill will be shelved, we shall hail its postponement as a sign of the decline of the Shuttleworth influence. The fact being, that the present state of the Education question, at least as regards the distribution of the grants, the freedom given to managers, and the general encouragement to voluntary efforts, is the best arrangement which can be come to. It is anything but perfect; but it will not bear tampering with. It is the Camarina of the day and the state. If Archdeacon Denison is right in not admitting unbaptized children into the parish school, we wish that he would tell us how we are to exercise mission and proselytism towards them? 3. As things are, how can we Educate?' (Salisbury : Brown,) is a good sermon by Mr. Fraser, of Cholderton, chiefly important as bringing together the fact that the clergy are not so much the teachers but the actual founders and supporters of most country schools. 4. •Lord John Russell's Speech on National Education,' delivered in the House of Commons, 4th April, 1833, (Longmans) will lose much of its significance to those who were not present at its delivery. It was temperate, quiet, and inoffensive; but delivered with an air of constraint, and under an obvious sense of difficulty. Of the influence of the Conservative element in the present administration, no stronger proofs can be required than the difference of tone on the subjects of Education and Convocation observable in this particular statesman. 5. • Inspectors Inspected,' by Mr. Andrew Reed, (Snow,) is a clever and caustic attack on the principle of Government aid, by an extreme Voluntaryist. 6. • National Education, the Sermon preached by Mr. Frederick Maurice, at an anniversary of S. Mark's College, (J. W. Parker,) is distin. quished by warmth and some forcible and appropriate remarks on the responsibilities of schoolmasters. 7. •Strictures on the New Government Measure,' by Edward Baines, (Snow,) is quite a manual for those who wish to get at the essence of the dissenting objections to Lord John Russell's speech and plan. 8. Mr. Sedgwick, of Magdalen, has sketched a colossal plan—reminding us in education of Mr. Martin's dreams of Egyptian and Ninevite architecture-in his Hints on the Establishment of Public Industrial Schools for the Working classes.' (Rivingtons.) Boarding-schools for the poor, and a poll-tax to support them, are its suggestions.

* Reform your Arches : The Course of Law Ecclesiastical, illustrated.' By Edward Dodd, B.D., (Vincent,) really contains some important matter, hidden and deserving to be lost because huddled up in the most grotesque language and absurd manner and style which has fallen in our way since the days of Mr. Prebendary Dennis.

* Poems by Archer Gurney: Spring,' (Bosworth,) is a volume containing a great quantity of verse for its price, which we observe is remarkably low. We hardly know what other aspect of this work to select, for its author 'pitches into' all reviewers, critics, and opinions, past, present, and future, expressed or to be expressed on his poems, with such headlong ferocity that we really dare not offer an opinion on Mr. Gurney's powers. With his decided judgment on all writers who do not give their names in their reviews we are only surprised that we should have been favoured with a copy of Mr. Gurney's 'Poems.'

• Theological Colleges and the Universities,' by Mr. Hebert, of Burslem, (Burslem : Bowering,) under the form of a plea for new Theological Colleges, is, in fact, an attack upon those already existing.

* The Life of Mrs. Godolphin,' (Pickering,) so well known and valued, we find in an abridged and cheap form for distribution.

* Meditations for a week on the Lord's Prayer,' (J. H. Parker,) are piously composed, but appear to mix up the notion of prayer-or rather aspiration—with that of meditation.

Mr. Bolton's Hulsean Prize Essay on the Patristic Evidences of Christianity,' (Macmillan,) is a very creditable manual, and deserves to become a text-book on the subject.

Mr. Mayor's edition of Juvenal, (Macmillan,) exhibits sound and extensive scholarship: a subject on which the Editor, judging from a sensible preface, containing some important strictures on the present state of classical learning in the Universities, has bestowed much pains.

Mr. Maurice's Theological Essays,' (Macmillan,) it would be unfair, indeed unjust, to characterise in one of these paragraphs. But we can say of them, that they exhibit much of the writer's beauties, ingenuity, paradox, and illustration, together with some matters on which we should seriously differ from him.

• Birch Church,' (Masters,) is a religious work, in the form of a dialogue, 'a narrative incidental and conversational.' It is a resunié of the disputes and difficulties, moral and theological, of the times, displayed in the form of a fiction—a region of literature about which our opinion has been so often expressed that we shall not repeat it.

Mr. Neale's • Church History for Children,' (Mozley,) is composed with all the writer's glowing and engaging style. But we must say distinctly, that the quiet unhesitating way in which the most questionable of later miracles are assumed, puzzles us. In such a work we want neither criticism nor discussion; but the results of either are not out of place in the simplest of narratives.

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