The American Journal of Science and Arts

Front Cover
S. Converse, 1871
 

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Contents

On Siredon Metamorphoses etc by E D Cope
89
Insects inhabiting Salt Water by A S Packard Jr
100
On the existence of the Nummulitic formation
110
Note on transversely striated muscular fiber among
123
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
129
Geology and Natural History V Reply to Mr Dalls criticism on the Binchiopods
149
On the Discovery of actual Glaciers on
157
Contributions from the Laboratory of the Lawrence
168
On the Porcelain rock of China by Baron
179
On the Geology of the Eastern Uintah Mountains
191
On the System of the Batrachia Anura of the British
198
On Foraminifera from the Gulf and River St Law
204
Brief Contributions to Zoology from the Museum
211
Gtulogy and Natural History Geological Survey of Ohio 215 Report on
223
Astronomy Solar Eclipse of Dec 22 Mediterranean Eclipse 1870 J NorJiax
230
Notice of the discovery of a Cave in East
235
Contributions to Physics from the Lawrence Sci
247
On Sporecases in Coal by J W Dawson
263
On the Determination of the Alkalies in Silicates
269
On the Great Sunspot of June 1843 by Daniel
275
On the Solar Protuberances by L Respighi _
283
XLVAmazonian Drift by Ch F Harit
294
On the Solar Corona by C A Young
311
XLV1I On the supposed Legs of the Trilobite Asaphus
320
Contributions to Chemistry from the Laboratory
329
On certain Glacial and PostGlacial phenomena of
339
Memorandum on the Amphipleura pellucida by J
345
On the Geology of the Delta and the Mudlumps
356
On the existence of the socalled compound Ammo
369
Geology and Natural History On the Mineralogy of Eozoou Canadcn se H Hoff
379
Miscellaneous Scientific InMUgerux Anthracite Coal Trade of Pennsylvania P
392
On Jupiter and its Satelites by M Mitchell
393
On the composition of Permanent Illuminating
408
Contributions to Chemistry from the Laboratory of
416
Infusorial Circuit of Generations by T C Hilgard 20
20
VLOn Ralstonite a new Fluoride from ArksutFiord
30
Contributions to Chemistry from the Laboratory of
44
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
55
Astronomy A remarkableMeteor R H Thurston 63
63
Miscellaneous Scientific Intelligence On the influence of a covering of Snow
70
APPENDIX Letter of B A Gould 77 Expedition of Prof Marsh 80
80
Art XLHistorical Notes on the Systems of Weather Tel
81
Infusorial Circuit of Generations by T C Hilgard 88
88
Tornadoes of the Southern States by H S Whit
96
Preliminary Notice of New North American Phyl
108
Geology and Natural History California Geological Survey 300 Geological Sur
111
A New Form of Galvanometer by J Trowbridge 118
118
XVLTLNotes on the distribution of the Vegetation
127
Notice of the Meteoric Stone of Searsmont Maine
133
Geology and Natural History Currents of the Oceans J Croll 140 On
153
Art XXLOn the Testimony of the Spectroscope to
155
Memoranda concerning the introduction of
168
The Daily Motion of a Hrick Tower caused by Solar
177
On the destructive Distillation of Light Petroleum
184
Observations on the Color of Fluorescent Solu
198
Astronomy Scintillation of the Stars L Respighi 222 On the recent Solar
227
On the Connecticut River valley Glacier
233
The Paragenesis and Derivation of Copper and
243
On Photographing Histological Preparations
258
Barometrical Measurements in Ecuador by
267
On some new Silurian Crinoids and Shells
295
Discovery of a new Planet and the Elements
303
Astronomy Transit of Venus in 1874 Asaph Hall 307 On a Meteor seen
308
Miscellaneous Scientific Intelligence Twentieth Meeting of the American Associa
311
On the position and height of the elevated Plateau
324
Variations in the Temperature of the Human Body
330
Popular names of British Plants Prior
476

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Page 152 - Crown 8vo. bevelled cloth, 4th edition. 6s. Adamson (Rev. TH) The Gospel according to St. Matthew, expounded. 8vo. izs. Adventures of a Young Naturalist. By LUCIEN BIART, with 117 beautiful Illustrations on Wood. Edited and adapted by PARKER GILLMORE, author of "All Round the World," " Gun, Rod, and Saddle,
Page 292 - Science is bound, by the everlasting law of honour, to face fearlessly every problem which can fairly be presented to it. If a probable solution, consistent with the ordinary course of nature, can be found, we must not invoke an abnormal act of Creative Power.
Page 291 - The essence of science, as is well illustrated by astronomy and cosmical physics, consists in inferring antecedent conditions, and anticipating future evolutions, from phenomena which have actually come under observation.
Page 291 - ... in a single day conveys an impression of the intensity of the forces acting to produce such a velocity of material transfer through space such as no other natural phenomenon is capable of exciting. It is clear that if we have to deal here with matter, such as we conceive it, viz., possessing inertia — at all, it must be under the dominion of forces incomparably more energetic than gravitation, and quite of a different nature...
Page 276 - He went home with the result, and commenced his calculations, but felt so much agitated that he handed over the arithmetical work to a friend: then (and not when, sitting in a garden, he saw an apple fall) did he ascertain that gravitation keeps the Moon in her orbit. Faraday's discovery of specific inductive capacity, which inaugurated the new philosophy, tending to discard action at a distance, was the result of minute and accurate measurement of electric forces. Joule's discovery of thermo-dynamic...
Page 240 - On the Surface Geology of the Basin of the Great Lakes and the Valley of the Mississippi.
Page 276 - Andrews' discovery of the continuity between the gaseous and liquid states was worked out by many years of laborious and minute measurement of phenomena scarcely sensible to the naked eye.
Page 292 - organic cells," or " protoplasm." But science brings a vast mass of inductive evidence against this hypothesis of spontaneous generation, as you have heard from my predecessor in the presidential chair. Careful enough scrutiny has, in every case up to the present day, discovered life as antecedent to life. Dead matter cannot become living without coming under the influence of matter previously alive. This seems to me as sure a teaching of science as the law of gravitation.
Page 262 - Lycopodium are nearer to lignite than to woody fibre, and may be converted into coal with far less loss of carbon and hydrogen than the latter. They in fact approach closer in composition to resins and fats than to wood, and, moreover, like those substances repel water, with which they are not easily moistened, and thus are able to resist those atmospheric influences which effect the decay of woody tissue.
Page 282 - When a piece of brass, compounded of copper and zinc, was put into the cup, the spectrum showed all the bands, each precisely in the place in which it had been seen when one metal or the other had been used separately. It is much to be regretted that this great generalisation was not published to the world twenty years ago.

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