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and that within six months after filing the articles of association in the secretary of state's office, construction of the road should be commenced and at least 10 per cent of the amount of the capital stock should be expended, and that the Company should finish the road and put it in operation within one year after the filing of its articles of association. For failure to comply with the last named condition the Company's corporate existence and all powers and rights conferred by the act were to cease. The legislature reserved the right to repeal, alter or modify the act.

Special franchises. April 13, 1875, the common council of Long Island City granted two franchise extensions under authority conferred by the original legislative charter. By one of which the company was authorized to extend its tracks from the corner of Vernon avenue and Broadway through Broadway to Snyder's park, between 10th and 11th avenues in the Fourth ward of Long Island City. By the other, to extend its tracks from the corner of Sunswick terrace and Fulton street through Fulton street, Main street, Flushing avenue, Kouwenhoven street, Potter avenue and Steinway avenue to the city limits, and in any other street and avenue that it may be necessary to extend its road.

The condition upon which these grants were given was that the Company was to complete construction within 90 days. The records do not show that these special franchises were ever approved or disapproved by the mayor of the city.

Stock and bonds. In 1875, the entire capital stock of the Company was paid in, and there was a funded debt of $90,000.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart III, no. 18.) August 1, 1879, the Company's road was leased to the Jackson and Steinway Avenue Railroad Company of Long Island City. In 1881, however, the latter company was enjoined from operating and the property reverted to the Company. April 17, 1883, the property and franchises of the Company were conveyed under foreclosure proceedings to William Steinway, and were by him conveyed by deed, dated April 24, 1883, to the Steinway and Hunter's Point Railroad Company (no. 647). The railroad and property of the Company now belong to the New York and Queens County Railway Company.

Construction and operation. Construction was not commenced until after September 30, 1874, and in February, 1875, the construction of the road was not completed. Later, in the same year, the president of the Company reported to the state engineer that the construction of the road had been completed and that the road was in operation. In 1876, the road is described as being five miles in length, the main line from Hunter's Point to Astoria being three miles in length. In 1877, the entire route is given as 7.5 miles in length, all constructed and in operation.

337 The Long Island Electric Railway Company

(Queens) Incorporation. March 5, 1894; Railroad Law of 1890; for purpose of constructing an electric) street railway from the village of Hempstead to the boundary line of the city of Brooklyn, at Liberty avenue; corporate life, 50 years; capital stock, $600,000; (route, about 20 miles). The description of the route within the jurisdiction of the Public Service Commission for the first district is as follows:

Commencing at the township line of the town of Jamaica, at or near Rosedale or Foster Meadows, and running thence along the Jamaica and Merrick turnpike, South street, Rockaway turnpike or Elm street and Liberty avenue to the Brooklyn city line; also from South street along Smith street to Fulton street in the village of Jamaica.

Extensions of route. By a certificate dated October 2, 1894, and filed in the office of the secretary of state, October 11, 1894, the Company extended its route in the village and town of Jamaica and town of Hempstead. The extension in the village of Jamaica was described as follows:

Along Henry street to Bandman avenue; along Bandman avenue to Elm street; along Elm street to South street; along South street to the easterly line of the village; also along Washington street from Fulton street to village line; also along New York avenue to the village line.

The portion of the extension in the town of Jamaica outside of the village was described as follows:

Along New York avenue and the Jamaica and Rockaway road to the township line; also along the highway and private property from New York avenue to the easterly township line near Valley stream; also along the highway connecting with South street to and through the villages of Queens, Hollis and Hempstead.

The portion of the extension lying in the town of Hempstead was described as follows:

Beginning at the westerly line of the township near Valley Stream and running along the highway or private property through the villages of Hewletts, Woodsburgh, Lawrence, Far Rockaway and Rockaway Beach; also easterly along the highway to East Rockaway, and thence southerly to Long Beach; and also northerly to Hempstead village.

By a certificate dated November 14, 1895, and filed in the office of the secretary of state, March 24, 1896, the Company again extended its route in the village and town of Jamaica and in the town of Hempstead, and also in the villages of Far Rockaway and Hempstead. The extension in the village of Jamaica was as follows:

Commencing at the corner of Henry street and Liberty avenue and running thence along H'enry street, Bandman avenue, Elm street and South street to the easterly line of the village; and also commencing at the corner of Washington and Fulton streets and running thence along Washington street to the southerly line of the village; also commencing at the corner of Fulton and Washington streets and running thence along Fulton street to the easterly line of the village; also commencing at the corner of New York avenue and Fulton street and running thence along New York avenue to the southerly line of the village.

The extension in the town of Jamaica outside of the village was as follows:

Commencing at the intersection of New York avenue and the southerly village line and running thence along New York avenue and the Jamaica and Rockaway turnpike road to the Hempstead line; also commencing at the corner of Cherry and New York avenues and running thence along Cherry avenue and Foster's Meadow road and through private property to Rosedale or Ocean avenue, and thence along the highway to the Hempstead line at or near Clear creek; also commencing at the intersection of South street and the easterly village line, and running thence along the highway and Springfield avenue to the Jamaica and Hempstead plank road; also commencing at the intersection of Fulton street and the easterly village line and running thence along the Jamaica and Hempstead plank road to the town of Hempstead line.

The extension in the town of Hempstead, so far as it affected the connecting route between the villages of Jamaica and Far Rockaway, was as follows:

Commencing at the Jamaica town line and running thence along the Jamaica and Rockaway turnpike road, Mott avenue, Lawrence avenue, Liberty street or Wanzer avenue, McNeill avenue or Hicks avenue and Bay View avenue to Sheridan boulevard at the Far Rockaway line; also commencing at the corner of McNeill or H’icks avenue and Liberty street or Wanzer avenue, and running thence along McNeill or Hicks avenue to the Far Rockaway village line.

The extension in the village of Far Rockaway was as follows: Commencing at the intersection of McNeill or Hicks avenue and the northerly village line, and running thence along McNeill or Hicks avenue to Remsen avenue, and thence along Remsen avenue and private property to Mott

avenue.

Special franchises. By agreement dated May 25, 1894, entered into with the commissioners of highways of the town of Jamaica, the Company secured the consent of the local authorities to construct a double track railroad from the Brooklyn city line to the Jamaica village line. This grant was conditioned as follows: The Company was to pave with block paving stone, and keep in repair the surface of the road between its rails and tracks, and for a distance of two feet on either side; the road was to be built and in full operation within two years from the date of consent; the rate of fare for the portion of the road on Liberty avenue was not to be more than five cents; cars to be run both ways every fifteen minutes, between 5 o'clock a. m. and 9 o'clock p. m.; at the end of 12 years the Company was to commence paying to the town, two per cent of its gross earnings, and at the end of 20 years, three per cent. By agreement dated January 26, 1895, the consent of the commissioners of highways was modified so as to permit the Company to pave with cobble-stones instead of block paving stones, and further, the Company was authorized to cross the tracks of any steam railroad by means of a bridge, in case the consent of the steam road could not be obtained for a grade crossing, and on condition that this Company should make good any damages to adjacent property resulting from the erection of a bridge.

By agreement dated October 6, 1894, the commissioners of highways of the town of Jamaica authorized the Company to construct its railroad in New York avenue from the Jamaica village line to the Jamaica and Rockaway turnpike, and thence along the Jamaica and Rockaway turnpike, subject to any rights of the Jamaica and Rockaway Turnpike Company, to the Hempstead line. This grant was conditioned as follows: The road to be single track, with flat rails; the Company to pave and keep in repair the street surface between the rails and for two feet on either side; the road might be built, if the Company desired, as a double track line, with a track on either side of the avenue, and in that event the Company was to pave the entire roadway as far as two feet beyond its outside rails; the railroad to be complete and in full operation within three years from the date of the grant; cars to be run every hour during the summer season from 6 a. m. to 9 p. m., and during the rest of the year “as often as the convenience of the public shall require;” at the expiration of 20 years the Company was to begin to pay to the town of Jamaica two per cent of its gross earnings under this franchise.

By agrcement dated December 3, 1894, the board of trustees of the village of Jamaica authorized the Company to construct a street railway, to be operated by electricity, upon the following route:

Commencing on Liberty avenue, at the village line; thence running along Liberty avenue, Henry street, Bandman avenue, Elm street and South street to Merrick road; also along New York avenue to the southerly line of the village, and along Washington street from South street to Fulton street.

This grant was conditioned as follows: Double tracks were to be laid except on Washington street, where a single track only was authorized; flat rails to be used, and the surface of the road between the rails and tracks and for a distance of two feet on either side was to be paved with Belgian paving stones, and to be kept in repair; the road was to be built and in full operation within two years from the date of the grant, but the grading, laying of tracks and paving on South street were to be completed before May 1, 1895; the rate of fare was not to be more than five cents for each passenger from any point in the village of Jamaica to Brooklyn; cars were to be run at intervals of not more than 15 minutes between 5 a. m. and 9 p. m.; at the expiration of 12 years the Company was to pay the village two per cent of its gross earnings on business arising within the village limits, and after 20 years it was to pay three per cent; speed of cars to be regulated by the village trustees; a bond of $5,000 to be executed before the agreement went into effect. By resolution the board of trustees of the village, February 7, 1895, authorized the Company to substituto cobble-stones for block pavement, also to connect its tracks with the existing tracks in Fulton street, with the consent

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