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Map. April 3, 1879, this Company filed a map of its route in the office of the register of Kings County.

Stock. In its report to the state engineer for year 1879 the Company stated that of its capital stock $112,200 had been subscribed, and $8,820 paid in. Since 1884 no record has been found of any further activity on the part of this Company, and it has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

176 The East New York and Jamaica Bay Railroad Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. December 10, 1864; General Railroad Law of 1850; corporate life, 50 years ; capital stock, $50,000; route (about two miles) as follows:

Commencing at some convenient point in the village of East New York, Kings County, and thence southerly terminating at Jamaica Bay at or near a lane or dock thereon called Faubles landing.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company never reported to the state engineer. In the state engineer's report, 1882, a statement appears that this Company was reorganized in 1872, as The Jamaica, Woodhaven and Brooklyn Railroad Company. This is an error, as in the certificate of incorporation of The Jamaica, Woodhaven and Brooklyn Railroad Company, filed in the office of the secretary of state the statement appears that that Company was a reorganization of the East New York and Jamaica Railroad Company, incorporated November 22, 1860. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

177 East New York and Jamaica Railroad Company

(Brookly!) Incorporation. November 22, 1860; General Railroad Law of 1850; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $250,000; route (about 61/2 miles) as follows:

From the head of Fulton avenue of East New York, Kings County, to and through the village of Jamaica in Queens County.

Construction. No record of any construction. In the state engineer's report for 1882, the Company is described as extinct.

178 East New York and Jamaica Railroad Company

(Brooklyn Incorporation. May 7, 1863, chapter 507, laws of 1863; for purpose of laying rails for the passage of railroad cars to be drawn by horses on each side of the road known as the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road; corporate life perpetual; capital stock not to exceed $300,000; Company to issue $100,000 bonds when it had expended $200,000; route as follows:

From the terminus of the Fulton avenue road at the easterly line of the city of Brooklyn in East New York to any part of the village of Jamaica.

The act provided that the road was to be completed in three years from the date of the Company's charter. If the Company should be unable to agree with the Jamaica and Brooklyn Plank Road Company, or any other corporation, for a right of way over the plank road, it was authorized to condemn real estate over and along Liberty avenue for a right of way. In case the Company purchased the franchise of the Jamaica and Brooklyn Plank Road Company, it was to have authority to collect the same tolls as were then allowed by law to turnpike and plankroad companies.

The Company was to keep and maintain the roadbed between its tracks in good order.

Right of way. December 24, 1863, this Company entered into an agreement with “ the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road Company,” whereby it acquired the perpetual right of laying rails for horse cars in that part of the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road extending from its terminus in the village of Jamaica, to a point opposite the hotel then kept by Wellington Simons, near the Brooklyn city line.

Stock. By section 2, chapter 760, laws of 1865, the capital stock was limited to $200,000. In the Company's report to the state engineer for 1870, it stated that $182,700 of its capital stock had been subscribed and $170,000 paid in. The following year it appears that the amount of capital stock paid in had increased to $175,800.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart IV, no. 12.) By chapter 224, laws of 1871, this Company was authorized to consolidate with “ the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road Company" (no. 302) under the name of the latter company, on terms to be approved by not less than 60 per cent of stock of the two companies. The Company was also authorized by this act to extend its tracks

Over Flushing avenue or any other avenue or street leading from the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road to Woodhaven, in the county of Queens; provided that the consent and approval of the owners of a majority of property in lineal feet on the line of said avenue or street. shall first be obtained.

The Company after consolidation was to have all the powers and privileges and be subject to the general liabilities of turnpike corporations, and was also to have the authority to consolidate with any company running in Kings County. The Company appears never to have taken advantage of the provisions of this act.

Foreclosure. January 3, 1872, "the Company's property and franchises were sold for the sum of $76,000 at public auction under the foreclosure of two mortgages, dated September 1, 1866, and September 6, 1867, respectively, and were later transferred by deed dated January 16, 1872, by John H. Sutphin to Edward M. Osborn, the purchaser, subject to a first mortgage, dated September 1, 1865, to secure the payment of the principal sum of $30,000 with interest, which on January 16, 1872, amounted to $10,272.50. By deed, dated August 27, 1872, the property was conveyed by Edward M. Osborn to The Jamaica, Woodhaven and Brooklyn Railroad Company (no. 306), which had been organized by Osborn and his associates as a reorganization of The East New York and Jamaica Rail Road Company, by certificate filed in the secretary of state's office, August 3, 1872. The old East New York and Jamaica Rail Road seems to have been constructed from the old city line at about Sackman street through what is now Jamaica avenue to Grand avenue in the village of Jamaica. This road now constitutes the Jamaica avenue line of the Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Company.

Operation. In a letter dated May 5, 1910, T. S. Williams, Vice-President of the Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Company, said: “So far as I can ascertain the railroad was first operated in 1866.”

179 The East New York, Bayside & Ozone

Park Railroad Company

(Brooklyn and Queens) Incorporation. December 24, 1885; General Street Railroad Law of 1884; for purpose of constructing a street surface railroad from New Lots to Woodhaven and Jamaica Bay (Kings and Queens) ; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $100,000, route (about six miles) as follows:

Commencing at the junction of Blake and Rockaway avenues, in New Lots, and running thence along Rockaway avenue, Baltic avenue (now Glenmore avenue), Alabama avenue, Atlantic avenue, Georgia avenue, Baltic avenue, Monroe street and the old Mill road to Jamaica Bay, with a branch from Baltic avenue (now Glenmore avenue); along Monroe street and Liberty avenue, to inersect the line of the “Woodhaven and Rockaway Beach Railroad," at Ozone park.

Map. May 24, 1886, this Company filed a map of its route in the office of the register of Kings County.

Special franchises. By consent of the highway commissioners, town of New Lots, the Company obtained franchises as follows:

December 30, 1885: Commencing at the intersection of Blake and Rockaway avenues, along Rockaway avenue to Baltic avenue, to Alabama avenue, to Atlantic avenue, to Georgia avenue, to Baltic avenue, to Monroe street, to the old Mill road, to the old Mill landing at Jamaica Bay. Also commencing at the intersection of Monroe street and Baltic avenue; along Monroe street to Liberty avenue to Queens County.

January 18, 1886: From junction of Alabama avenue and Baltic street; along Baltic street to Georgia avenue, to Atlantic avenue, to Wyckoff avenue, to Baltic street to the former route.

July 12, 1886: Commencing at the junction of Rockaway avenue and Baltic street, along Rockaway avenue to East New York avenue to the west town line; and along East New York avenue to the west town line; and along East New York avenue to Johnson avenue, to Baltic avenue; along Baltic avenue to former route.

Property owners' consents. In 1886 the Company filed in the county clerk's office of Kings County, consents to the construction and operation of its road on:

Rockaway avenue, Baltic avenue, Georgia avenue, Atlantic avenue and Wyckoff avenue; also on Monroe street to the old Mill, and on Liberty avenue east of county line from Monroe street.

Intercorporate relations. By order of the Supreme Court the name of this Company was changed to Brooklyn Annex Street Railway Company (no. 63) on October 6, 1886, a copy of the order being filed in the office of the secretary of state September 8, 1886.

Construction. No record of any construction by this Company.

I 80 East River and Atlantic Ocean Railroad Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. November 18, 1895; The Railroad Law; for purpose of constructing a double track street surface railroad; corporate life, 1000 years; capital stock, $3,000,000; route (about 25 miles) as follows:

Beginning at the Queens County line at Newtown creek at Manhattan avenue; thence to Clay street; along Clay to Franklin avenue, to Dupont, to West, to Calyer, to Leonard, to Driggs, to Ewen, to Johnson avenue, to Morgan avenue, to Hamburg avenue, to Woodbine or Monroe; commencing at North Second street and Marcy avenue, city of Brooklyn; thence along North Second street to North Fifth street, to Wythe avenue, to North 13th street, to Kent avenue, to Franklin street, to Calyer; also commencing at Franklin and Quay streets, along Quay to West to Calyer; also commencing at Monroe or Woodbine streets and Ridgewood avenue, Brooklyn, along Woodbine or Monroe to and across Broadway to Monroe, continuing along Monroe to Classon avenue, along same to Pacific, to Nevins, to Livingston, to Court, to Fulton, to Liberty, to High; also commencing at Classon and Pacific streets, along Pacific to Franklin avenue, to Bergen, to Rogers avenue; also commencing at Pacific street and Fifth avenue, along latter to Atlantic avenue, to Flatbush avenue, to State, to Nevins; also commencing at North Fifth avenue and Wythe avenue, along latter to South Eighth; also commencing at Classon avenue and Monroe street, along former to Park avenue; also commencing at Classon avenue and Pacific, along former to Washington avenue, to Malbone street, to Ocean avenue; also commencing at Atlantic avenue and Sixth avenue, along latter to Prospect avenue, to Greenwood avenue, to East Fourth street, to Church avenue, to East 14th street, to the old boundary line between towns of New Utrecht and Gravesend; also commencing at Pacific and Nevins streets, along latter to Carroll, to Third avenue, to Third street; also commencing at Livingston and Hoyt streets, and along latter to Fulton, and across same into Bridge, along latter to Concord; also commencing at Central avenue and Jefferson, and along latter to Cypress avenue, to Troutman street, to the boundary line of the city of Brooklyn; also commencing at Bridge and Concord streets, along former to Nassau, to Washington, to Sands, to Fulton, to High, to Liberty, to Nassau, and again to Washington; also commencing at Elizabeth and Dwight streets, along former to Halleck, to Hicks, to Cranberry, to Fulton, across same to High, along latter to Washington; also commencing at Sixth and Prospect avenues, along the former to Greenwood cemetery at or near 23d street.

Special franchises. November 29, 1897, the common council of the city of Brooklyn adopted a resolution granting to the Com

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