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DuPont, of Wilmington, Delaware. Prior to the incorporation of this Company, Johnson and DuPont had acquired from The Atlantic Avenue Railroad Company of Brooklyn, by lease for the entire period of the corporate life of that company, its franchises and rights to construct and operate a railroad :

Commencing at Park and Washington avenues and running thence along Park avenue, across and along Broadway to and through Locust street, Park street, Beaver street, Bushwick avenue, Jefferson street and Central avenue to the Evergreen cemetery, together with the exclusive use of one track at the Fulton ferry, to be furnished by the Atlantic Avenue company; also the right to the joint use with the Atlantic Avenue company of the existing railroad tracks and franchises from Washington avenue to Fulton ferry, through Park avenue and Navy, Concord, Washington, Front, Fulton and Water streets, with the exclusive right to the use of a stand at the New York and Brooklyn bridge or on the vacant property at the southeast corner of Washington and Sands streets.

By an instrument dated January 6, 1887, Johnson and DuPont assigned the lease acquired and just described to this Company.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart IV, no. 39.) In 1893 the property of the Company was leased to The Atlantic Avenue Railroad Company of Brooklyn. On April 4, 1896, the property of the Company was leased to the Nassau Electric Railroad Company.

December 23, 1897, the property of this Company was sold at public auction in foreclosure proceedings and bid in by John C. Breckenridge for $5,300. On the same date the title to the property was transferred to Breckenridge by deed executed by Daniel C. Briggs, referee, and subsequently, on December 27, 1897, this Company executed a confirmatory deed to Breckenridge. Neither of these deeds contains any detailed description of the property and franchises acquired by Breckenridge. December 27, 1897, Breckenridge and his associates filed a certificate of reorganization of the Company under the name of the United Railroad Company (no. 686), and on the following day, December 28, 1897, Breckenridge transferred the property to the new company.

Construction. There is no record of any new construction by the Company.

73 Brooklyn Cable Rail Road Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. March 21, 1883; General Railroad Law of 1850; for purpose of constructing a double track railroad to be operated by propelling rope or cable attached to stationary power; corporate life, 100 years; capital stock, $250,000; route (about 1/2 mile) as follows:

Commencing at or near the intersection of Court and Montague streets, in Brooklyn; thence through Montague westerly by the most direct and feasible route to a terminus at or near the Wall street ferry in said city.

Maps. March 22, 1883, the Company filed in the register's office of Kings County a map and profile of its route, Wall street ferry to City hall.

Stock. The Company's first and last report to the Railroad Commission, 1883, stated that $1,000 of its stock had been subscribed and $600 paid in.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

74 Brooklyn Central and Jamaica Railroad Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. August 8, 1860; chapter 460, laws of 1860; as a consolidation of The Brooklyn Central Rail Road Company (no. 75), and The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company (no. 49). The new company was authorized to extend its road in or through any town in the county of Kings, upon receiving the written consent of the local authority and two-thirds of the abutting property owners, and also to construct and operate a railroad on Lafayette, Bedford and Gates avenues to be mutually enjoyed by this Company and The Brooklyn City Rail Road Company upon terms to be agreed upon by the companies. All laws authorizing the use of steam upon this road or any other road in the city of Brooklyn were repealed, such repeal to take effect after the discontinuance by The Long Island Railroad Company of the use of steam on the Brooklyn and Jamaica railroad.

At the time of consolidation no portion of The Brooklyn Central Rail Road Company's route had been constructed, but The Brooklyn and Jamaica Rail Road Company had a line constructed

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and in operation from the East river at the foot of Atlantic street, through Atlantic street and Atlantic avenue to the city line at East New York, and continuing thence by private right of way to Jamaica. It also had constructed or had under construction a branch line from Atlantic street, through Flatbush avenue and Fifth avenue to 37th street, and had certain additional franchise routes which had not been constructed.

This Company was excepted from the provisions of chapter 328, laws of 1861, which was an act supplemental to the act consolidating the cities of Brooklyn and Williamsburg and the town of Bushwick.

Change of route. By chapter 510, laws of 1863, the Company was authorized to change its route at or near the easterly limits of the city of Brooklyn, so as to run across the lands of James L. Williams. The Company was also authorized to construct and operate a ferry across Jamaica bay to and from a point at or near Canarsie, for the transportation of freight and passengers. The Company was further authorized to lease the whole or any part of its road.

Stock. The Company's first report to the state engineer, 1860, stated that $489,300 of the authorized capital stock had been subscribed and $448,750 paid in.

Motive power. May 9, 1861, The Long Island Railroad Company pursuant to its agreement with The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company dated April 26, 1860, abandoned the use of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad, and thereupon the use of steam on this Company's lines within the limits of the city of Brooklyn was discontinued. Upon the withdrawal of The Long Island Railroad Company, this Company commenced operation of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad by steam power east of the city line at East New York, and by horse power within the city limits.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart IV, no 38.) February 25, 1861, this Company acquired from The Brooklyn City Rail Road Company, the right to the joint use of the latter's tracks on Furman street between Fulton street and Atlantic street, and also the track on Flatbush avenue between Atlantic street and Fifth avenue. In return, The Brooklyn City Rail Road Company secured trackage rights on the portion of this Company's tracks on Fifth avenue. This agreement between the two companies was expressly confirmed by chapter 39 laws of 1861.

May 9, 1861, the Long Island Railroad Company abandoned the lease of the property of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company, which had come into the possession of the Company by merger.

Foreclosure and reorganization. In the state engineer's report for 1865, there is published a letter, dated December 19, 1865, and signed by A. H. Lowerre, managing agent for the purchaser, which states that this Company was sold under foreclosure of the fourth mortgage on August 7, 1865, and September 14, 1865, and that as yet no reorganization had been perfected.

As a matter of fact, the property and franchises of The Brooklyn Central and Jamaica Railroad were transferred by Gerard M. Stevens, referee, March 27, 1866, to The Brooklyn, and Jamaica Railway Company (no. 50). The deed given by the referee was in pursuance of the sale of August 7, 1865, and of the sale of September 14, 1865, to Electus B. Litchfield.

Construction and operation. It is shown by the description of parcel no. 8, contained in the referee's deed above mentioned that the Company's road extended from Church street in the village of Jamaica, through the village of East New York and the city of Brooklyn to the East river, with a branch from Flatbush avenue to Fifth avenue and through Fifth avenue to 37th street. There was also included in this sale the Company's right to construct branches and connecting roads and all of its “liberties, privileges and franchises” including the Company's right, title and interest in the rails, roadway and track on Atlantic avenue in the city of Brooklyn. The route of the Company is now operated by component companies of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit System.

75 The Brooklyn Central Rail Road Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. August 31, 1859; General Railroad Lew; for purpose of constructing a double track railroad, “except where a single track only can be laid ”; corporate life, 999 years; capital stock, $500,000; route (about 15 miles) as follows:

Commencing at the termination of Montague place at or near the Wall street ferry, running thence through Montague place, Furman street, Atlantic street and Atlantic avenue, to the city line (East New York); also from Atlantic avenue, through Powers street (now Third avenue), Flatbush avenue, Lafayette avenue, Bedford avenue and Gates avenue to the centre of Division avenue; also from Altantic avenue through Flatbush avenue and Fifth avenue to the city line, (boundary line of New Utrecht); also from Fifth avenue, through Third street to the city line, (boundary line of Flatbush).

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart IV, no. 43.) By chapter 460, laws of 1860, this Company was authorized to consolidate with The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company to form the Brooklyn Central and Jamaica Railroad Company (no. 74). In a report made by the consolidated company to the state engineer for year 1860, it was stated that the two companies had been consolidated on August 8th, of that year.

Construction and operation. A letter addressed to the state engineer dated December 20, 1859, and signed by E. B. Litchfield, as president of this Company, stated that the road had not been completed or in running order until after the 30th of September.

76 The Brooklyn Central Rail Road Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. August 8, 1860; law not stated; for purpose of constructing a double track railroad, corporate life, 999 years; capital stock, $500,000; route as follows:

Commencing at the termination of Montague place, Brooklyn, near Wall street ferry, running thence along Montague place, Furman street, Atlantic street and Atlantic avenue to the city line (East New York); also from Atlantic avenue, through Powers street (now Third avenue), Flatbush avenue, Lafayette avenue, Bedford avenue and Gates avenue to Division avenue; also from Atlantic street, through Flatbush avenue and Fifth avenue to the city line (New Utrecht boundary); also from Fifth avenue, through Third street to the city line (Flatbush boundary line); also from Wall street ferry, through Montague street and Furman street to and across Fulton street; thence through Water street, Gold street, DeKalb avenue to the. Broadway Railroad, returning through Hudson avenue and Front street to Fulton ferry; also from Atlantic street through Hicks street, Joralemon street and Willoughby street to Gold street; also from Atlantic street through Hicks street and Warren street to Fifth avenue; also from Hicks street through Baltic street to Fifth avenue.

This Company had the same name as the company incorporated August 31, 1859, and afterwards consolidated under the authority of chapter 460, laws of 1860, with The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company. This Company's route included all the route described in the charter of The Brooklyn Central Rail Road

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