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621 South Shore Traction Company

(Queens and Manhattan) Incorporation. March 2, 1903; The Railroad Law of 1890; for purpose of constructing a double or single track street surface railroad, to be operated by any lawful motive power except steam; corporate life, 999 years; capital stock, $2,000,000; route (about 60 miles) as follows:

From the easterly boundary line of Greater New York to Carman's river (Nassau and Suffolk Counties).

Extensions of route. By certificates filed in the office of the secretary of state the Company extended its route ay follows:

September 23, 1907 : Beginning at a point on Jackson avenue in the borough of Queens, city of New York, where the same intersects the entrance to the Blackwell's Island bridge, so called, over, upon and along the said avenue to Foster avenue, over, upon and along Foster avenue to Gosman avenue, over, upon and along Gosman avenue to Thompson avenue, over, upon and along Thompson avenue to the Hoffman boulevard, over, upon and along the Hoffman boulevard to Hillside avenue, over, upon and along Hillside avenue to Husson avenue, over, upon and along Husson avenue and by private right of way to the Old Country road, over, upon and along the Old Country road to Farmers avenue, over, upon and along Farmers avenue to Central avenue; thence in a generally easterly direction over, upon and along Central avenue to where it intersects the boundary line between the city of New York and the town of Hempstead, said point being the westerly terminal point of the South Shore Traction Company as designated in its certificate of incorporation; also, beginning at a point on Jackson avenue in the borough of Queens, city of New York, where the same intersects the entrance of the Blackwell's Island bridge, so called, over, upon and along said Jackson avenue to. Barn street, over, upon and along Barn street to Rapelje avenue, over, upon and along Rapelje avenue and by private right of way to Thompson avenue, over, upon and along Thompson avenue to the point of its intersection with Gosman avenue; also, beginning at a point in the borough of Queens, city of New York, where Hill street intersects Foster avenue, over, upon and along said Hill street to its intersection with Thompson avenue; also, beginning at a point in the borough of Queens, city of New York, where Husson avenue intersects Hillside avenue; thence over, upon and along Hillside avenue to Flushing avenue; thence over, upon and along Flushing avenue to Woodhull avenue, and over, upon and along Woodhull avenue and by private right of way to Seminole avenue, and over, upon and along Seminole avenue to the Old Country road.

January 25, 1908: Beginning at the so-called Bridge plaza of the Blackwell's Island bridge, thence over and across Jackson avenue; thence along the so-called Bridge Approach to Thompson avenue; thence along Thompson avenue, crossing the intervening streets and tracks of the Long Island Railroad to Hoffman boulevard; thence along Hoffman boulevard to and across Hillside avenue and other intervening streets and by private right of way to and across Maple street and Shelton avenue; thence along Shelton avenue to Union avenue; thence along Union avenue to, along and across Fulton street to Union Hall avenue; thence along Union Hall avenue and by private right of way to and across New York avenue to Linden street; thence along Linden street to and across Locust street and by private right of way to Puntine street; thence along Puntine street to South street; thence along South street, crossing the Long Island Railroad, to Farmers road; thence along, upon and across Farmers road and by private right of way to Central avenue; thence in a generally easterly direction over, upon and along Central avenue to where it intersects the boundary line between the city of New York and the town of Hempstead, said point being the western terminal point of the South Shore Traction Company, as designated in its certificate of incorporation; and also crossing such other streets, avenues and highways as may intersect such designated routes.

May 6, 1908: Beginning at the so-called Bridge plaza of the Blackwell's Island bridge, thence over and across Jackson avenue; thence along the socalled Bridge Approach to Thompson avenue; thence along Thompson avenue, crossing the intervening streets and tracks of the Long Island Railroad to Hoffman boulevard; thence along Hoffman boulevard to and across Hillside avenue and other intervening streets and by private right of way to and across Maple street and Shelton avenue; thence along Shelton avenue to Union avenue; thence along Union avenue to, along and across Fulton street to Union Hall avenue; thence along Union Hall avenue and by private right of way to and across New York avenue to Linden street; thence along Linden street to and across Locust street and by private right of way to Puntine street; thence along Puntine street to South street; thence along South street, crossing the Long Island Railroad, to Farmers road; thence along, upon and across Farmers road and by private right of way to Central avenue; thence in a generally easterly direction over, upon and along Central avenue to where it intersects the boundary line between the city of New York and the town of Hempstead, said point being the western terminal point of the South Shore Traction Company, as designated in its certificate of incorporation; and also beginning at a point on the so-called Bridge plaza of the Blackwells 'Island bridge in Long Island City, borough of Queens, New York City, thence extending westerly over, upon and along said Bridge plaza and across said Blackwell's Island bridge to the plaza of said Blackwell's Island bridge in the borough of Manhattan, city of New York, and over, upon, along and across said Bridge plaza in the said borough of Manhattan, city of New York.

December 24, 1908: Commencing at the Queens end of the Blackwell's Island (Queensboro) Bridge plaza, crossing Jackson avenue to a proposed new street, and running thence upon the proposed new street and across the proposed viaduct to be constructed as a part of such street over the Sunnyside yard, to Thompson avenue; thence along Thompson avenue, Hoffman boulevard to Brooklyn and Jamaica turnpike or Fulton street (Jamaica), Campion avenue, Archer place and private right of way to the intersection of Tyndall street and Archer place; thence along Archer place and private right of way; crossing Rockaway turnpike and Division street to Church street; thence through Church street, Twombly place and Fleet street to Prospect street; thence through Prospect street over the tracks of the Long Island Railroad to Cumberland street; thence through Cumberland street to a point within 600 feet of the Merrick road; thence in a southerly direction approxi. mately parallel with New York avenue, along a private right of way to a point about opposite the line of Central avenue if extended; thence easteriy on private right of way to and across the Merrick road to Central avenue; thence along Central avenue crossing the tracks of the Montauk division of The Long Island Railroad to the city line; also from Fulton street (Jamaica), through Rose avenue and Archer place to Campion avenue; also from Rose avenue through Carll street and by private right of way to the intersection of Archer place and Tyndall street; also from a point where Archer place, if extended, would intersect Division street, through Division street and Twombly place to and across Church street; also beginning at a point on private right of way between Fulton street (Jamaica), and the tracks of The Long Island Railroad, approximately in the line of Guilford street, if extended, and running thence on private right of way to and across The Long Island Railroad tracks to Guilford street; thence through Guilford street, Liberty avenue, Henry street, South street and New York avenue, to a point approximately opposite the line of Central avenue, if extended; thence through private property and across the Merrick road to Central avenue; also beginning at a point in Fulton street (Jamaica), opposite Alsop street, and running thence westerly along Fulton street to the Rockaway turnpike; thence along the Rockaway turnpike, crossing the tracks of The Long Island Railroad to a point at or near Johnson avenue; thence in a generally easterly direction on private right of way and across Division street to Beaver street; thence on Beaver street and crossing the tracks of The Long Island Railroad to Church street; thence along Church street to South street; also along Johnson avenue from Guilford street to Rockaway turnpike; also from Prospect street in an easterly direction through Fleet street to Washington street, and thence in a southerly direction through Washington street and crossing the tracks of The Long Island Railroad to South street; also from Hoffman boulevard through Pierson street, Kaplan avenue, Amlierst street, Alsop street and Fulton street (Jamaica), to Church street; thence southerly through Church street and crossing the tracks of The Long Island Railroad to and across Beaver street; also from Kaplan avenue through Degrauw avenue and Alsop street to and across Amherst street; also across the Blackwell's Island bridge from Jackson avenue, Queens, to Second avenue, Manhattan.

May 6, 1912: Sutphin road from Carll street to Lambertville avenue, and Lambertville avenue from Sutphin road to Spangler street, as the same are located and described in a map commonly known as the Jamaica Map, adopted by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment of the city of New York January 11, 1912, and showing the street system and grades of that portion of the fourth ward of the borough of Queens, bounded by Hillside avenue, Villard avenue, Old Country road, Farmers avenue, Freeport avenue, Rockaway boulevard, Van Wyck avenue and New Haven avenue.

Certificate of convenience and necessity. October 25, 1904, the Railroad Commission granted the Company a certificate of convenience and necessity for its charter route.

This route, as already indicated, lay entirely outside of what is now the First District.

Special franchises. May 20, 1909, by contract entered into with the City of New York, the Company obtained the consent of the local authorities to the construction of its road along the route set forth in the certificate of extension of December 24, 1908, with the exception of the part of the route on Blackwell's Island (Queensboro) bridge, and on this portion of the route the Company secured the right to operate over tracks belonging to the City. This contract was for the usual term of 25 years, with one renewal, and contained the usual provisions found in such municipal contracts. This contract was abrogated by a new contract dated October 29, 1912.

December 31, 1909, by contract entered into with the City of New York the terms of the contract of May 20, 1909, were modified as to payments required of the Company. This contract was abrogated by the new contract dated October 29, 1912.

By order dated June 8, 1909, the Public Service Commission for the First District refused to approve the exercise of the Company's franchise, principally on the ground that it gave the Company a virtual monopoly for 50 years of the only available street railway route between Manhattan and Jamaica by way of the Queensboro bridge, the terms as to the joint use of tracks being practically prohibitive. The Company appealed from the decision of the Commission and obtained a reversal from the appellate division. The Commission took the case to the Court of Appeals, but the judgment of the appellate division was affirmed in the Court of Appeals on October 26, 1909 (196 N. Y. 212). In conformity with the court's decision the Public Service Commission granted a certificate of approval for the exercise of this franchise November 12, 1909.

October 29, 1912, the Company entered into a contract with the City of New York whereby the contracts of May 20, 1909, December 24, 1909, and December 31, 1909, were abrogated, and declared null and void, and a new grant substituted in place thereof with a route as follows:

Beginning at the southeasterly line of the Queensboro bridge plaza, the same being the northwesterly side line of Jackson avenue; thence by double track, in, upon and across Jackson avenue to the viaduct over the Sunnyside yards of The Long Island Railroad Company (Queens boulevard) or the approach thereto; thence by double track upon and along the viaduct over the Sunnyside yards of the Long Island Railroad Company (Queens boulevard) and the approaches thereto to Thompson avenue; thence by double track in and upon Thomson avenue to Hoffman boulevard; thence by double track in and upon Hoffman boulevard, to Brooklyn and Jamaica turnpike or Fulton street; thence by double track in and upon Brooklyn and Jamaica turnpike or Fulton street to Rose avenue and by single track to Campion avenue; thence by single track in and upon Rose avenue to Archer place and by single track in and upon Campion avenue to Carll street; thence by single track in and upon Archer place to private property, and by single track in and upon Carll street to private property; thence in and upon private property by single or double track to a point approximately in line with Guilford street if the same were extended; thence by double track in and upon private property approximately in line with Guilford street if the same were extended and crossing under the tracks of The Long Island Railroad Company to Guilford street; thence by double track in and upon Guilford street to a point between Beaufort avenue and Broadway; thence by double track in and upon private property to and across Liberty avenue to Jay street; thence by double track in and upon Jay street and across Sylvester avenue; thence by double track in and upon private property to Rockaway turnpike at approximately the point where the same is intersected by Shore avenue; thence by double track in and upon Rockaway turnpike to Pacific street; thence by double track in and upon Pacific street to and across Brooklyn avenue; thence by double track in and upon private property approximately in line with Pacific street if the same were extended to Vine street; thence by double track in and upon Vine street to State street; thence by double track in and upon State street to Woodland avenue; thence by double track in and upon Woodland avenue to private property; thence by double track in and upon private property approximately on a line with Woodland avenue if the same were extended, to a point approximately in line with Central avenue if the same were extended; thence by double track in and upon private property approximately on a line with Central avenue if the same were extended, to Merrick road; thence by single track across Merrick road to Central avenue; thence by single track in and upon Central avenue and crossing the Montauk division of the Long Island Railroad to a point where Central avenue intersects the boundary line between the city of New York and county of Nassau.

Said route between the point in private property approximately in line with Guilford street if the same were extended, and the point where Central avenue is intersected by the boundary line between the city of New York and the county of Nassau, lying within certain streets as shown upon a map commonly known as the Jamaica Map, which was adopted by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment January 11, 1912, and showing the street system and grades of that portion of the fourth ward, borough of Queens, city of New York, bounded by Hillside avenue, Villard avenue, Old Country road, Farmers avenue, Freeport avenue, Rockaway boulevard, Van Wyck avenue and New Haven avenue, to wit: Sutphin road from a point between the tracks of the Long Island Railroad and Brooklyn and Jamaica turnpike or Fulton street and crossing under the tracks of the Long Island Railroad to Lambertville avenue; Lambertville avenue from Sutphin road to Spangler street; Spangler street from Lambertville avenue to Brinkerhoff

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