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Route as reported to the Railroad Commission. In the Company's report to the Railroad Commission for 1883, it stated that it had adopted a route as follows:

An underground tunnel of the width of 36 feet under the surface of Atlantic avenue in the city of Brooklyn, from near the South ferry to a point between Third and Fourth avenues; thence by an open cut through private property to be purchased, and by a tunnel under the intersecting streets to the city line of New Utrecht, Gravesend, Flatlands to Rockaway inlet and Coney Island.

Maps. August 17, 1881, and October 1, 1881, the Company filed in the register's office of Kings County maps showing plan and profile of its route.

Stock. In the Company's report to the state engineer for 1882 it apears that $21,100 of capital stock had been subscribed and $2,110 paid in.

Consent of property owners. Some time prior to May, 1882, the Company obtained consent to the construction of its road from the majority in value of the owners of property fronting on that portion of Atlantic avenue in which its tunnel was to be built.

Consent of city. Pursuant to chapter 518, laws of 1881, in 1882 or shortly thereafter, the Company applied to the local authorities for the necessary franchises, which, however, it failed to obtain.

Intercorporate relations. March 5, 1886, by certificate filed in the office of the secretary of state, this Company was consolidated with the Tunnel Extension Railway Company and The Bridge Tunnel Rail Road Company to form The Brooklyn Sub Railway Company (no. 110).

Construction. There is no record of any construction by this Company.

617 The South Ferry Railroad Company

(Manhattan Incorporation. January 3, 1889; General Railroad Law of 1850 and chapter 508, laws of 1874; corporate life, 1000 years; capital stock, $150,000; route (about two miles) as follows:

From the intersection of Church and Vesey streets in the city of New York, thence through, upon and along Church street with double tracks to Alorris street; thence through, upon and along Morris street with a double track to Greenwich street; thence through, upon and along Greenwich street with

a double track to Battery place; thence through, upon and along Battery place with a double track to State street; thence through, upon and along State street with a single track to Whitehall street; thence through, upon and along Whitehall street with a single track to the South ferry, returning through, upon and along Whitehall street to Bowling Green; thence through, upon and along the southerly side of Bowling Green to connect with double tracks at Battery place.

This description is the same as the description given in chapter 508, laws of 1874, providing for the incorporation of The South Ferry Railway Company.

Deeds acquiring property of South Ferry Railway Company. March 11, 1889, this Company received a deed from Henry Thompson of the property and franchises of The South Ferry Railway Company (no. 618), which had been conveyed to Thompson under foreclosure proceedings on December 27, 1888. In exchange for this property Thompson received $147,400 out of a total of $150,000 of this Company's capital stock, and the total issue ($350,000) of this Company's first mortgage five per cent bonds. Mr. Thompson at the time this transfer occurred was president of The Broadway and Seventh Avenue Railroad Company.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart I, no. 21.) January 28, 1889, this Company entered into an agreement with The Broadway and Seventh Avenue Railroad Company, whereby that Company was granted the right to use the tracks of this Company, and to operate its road in connection with such use. sideration for this agreement was the guarantee by The Broadway and Seventh Avenue Railroad Company of the principal and interest on the $350,000 bond issue of this Company. The contract was to last during the corporate lives of both companies.

By contract dated November 29, 1893, and filed in the office of the secretary of state December 12, 1893, this Company together with the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad Company and The Broadway Railway Company, merged to form the original Metropolitan Street Railway Company (no. 371). Construction.

This Company's railroad was originally constructed by the South Ferry Railway Company.

The con

618 The South Ferry Railway Company

(Manhattan) Incorporation. September 22, 1874; chapter 508, laws of 1874; corporate life, 1,000 years; capital stock, $150,000; route (about two miles) as follows:

Commencing at the northerly side of Vesey street, thence through and upon and along Church street to Morris street; along Morris street to Greenwich street; along Greenwich street to Battery place; along Battery place to State street; along State street to Whitehall street; along Whitehall to the South ferry; two tracks, except on State and Whitehall streets; returning, along Whitehall street to Bowling Green and along southerly side of Bowling Green to connect with double tracks at Battery place.

By this act the Company obtained a franchise to construct its road on streets as set forth in its charter, and was required to pay into the city treasury one per cent of its gross receipts. By chapter 393, laws of 1875, the amount of this payment was increased to two per cent of the gross receipts.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart I, no. 20.) January 12, 1875, the Company entered into an agreement with The Central Park, North and East River Railroad Company whereby it obtained the right to use tracks of that company running through Battery place from foot of Greenwich street to head of State street, and through State street from Battery place to Whitehall street, thence down Whitehall street to South ferry; also through Bowling Green from head of State street to intevgection with Whitehall street. The terms of this grant were to extend for ten years from January 1, 1875.

February 29, 1888, the property and franchises of the Company were sold at foreclosure to George W. Vultee for the sum of $270,000. By deed executed December 27, 1888, Vultee assigned his rights to Henry Thompson, who in turn transferred the property by deed dated March 11, 1889 to The South Ferry Railroad Company (no. 617), incorporated January 3, 1889.

Construction and operation. The Company's road was constructed and opened for operation in 1875. It is now operated by the New York Railways Company.

619 Southfield Beach Railroad Company

(Richmond) Incorporation. August 18, 1889, The Railroad Law of 1890; for purpose of constructing and operating a steam or electric railroad two miles long, extending from South to Midland beach; corporate life 99 years; capital stock $250,000; no description of route given.

Maps. April 17, 1900, the Company filed in the office of the county clerk of Richmond County a map of its route from Ocean avenue to Sand lane, and on June 28, 1901, a map

for which an unsuccessful search has been made.

Certificate of convenience and necessity. March 24, 1900, the Railroad Commission granted this Company a certificate of convenience and necessity, which certificate the Company filed in the office of the secretary of state on July 23, 1900.

Legal difficulties in respect to right of way. The Company acquired its right of way from Henry W. Work, who held title subject to a mortgage held by Sarah H. Barnes and others, the former owners. The Company obtained a release from the mortgages on condition that the road should be constructed and operated by June 15, 1901, otherwise the release was to be of no effect. The Company did not, however, commence the operation of the road until August 10, 1901. In an action to foreclose the mortgage, on March 8, 1909, the Company appeared as one of the defendants. Judge Thomas, before whom the action was brought, held, that the Company had forfeited its release by failure to operate the road within the required time. Judge Thomas was sustained by the appellate division and the court of appeals (202 N. Y. 301). The Company then had commissioners appointed to condemn that portion of its right-of-way which was subject to the mortgage lien. These Commissioners returned a favorable report which was confirmed and on appeal to the appellate division affirmed by that body.

Stock. In the Company's report to the Railroad Commission for the year ending June 30, 1901, it showed that it had issued and had outstanding stock amounting to $250,000.

Intercorporate relation. (See also chart III, no. 46.) The stock control of this Company is in the Richmond Light & Railroad Company.

Operation. The Company commenced operation of its road on August 10, 1901.

620 South Flatbush Railroad Company

(Brookıyn) Incorporation. January 7, 1909; The Railroad Law; for purpose of constructing a double or single track street surface railroad to be propelled by electricity or animal power, cable power, compressed air or any other motive power other than steam locomotive power; corporate life, 999 years; capital stock, $30,000; route (about three miles) as follows:

From the intersection of the Brighton Beach division of the Brooklyn Union Elevated Railroad Company with Avenue Q as laid down upon the map of Kings County; thence easterly along Avenue Q to Garretson avenue; thence southeasterly on Garretson avenue to Avenue S; thence easterly on Avenue S to West 34th street; thence northerly on West 34th street to Avenue Q; thence easterly on Avenue Q to the centre of Flatbush avenue; also from the intersection of Avenue Q and Garretson avenue easterly along Avenue Q to the intersection of West 34th street with Avenue Q.

Extension. By certificate filed in the secretary of state's office May 26, 1909, the Company extended its route as follows:

Beginning at the intersection of Garretson avenue and Avenue S; thence southeasterly on Garretson avenue to the point where Garretson avenue intersects the Neck road; thence along the Neck road on Garretson avenue, as laid down on the map of Kings County to Avenue U; thence easterly on Avenue U to Flatbush avenue; thence northerly on Flatbush avenue to Avenue Q.

Special franchises. January 26, 1909, the Company petitioned the Board of Estimate and Apportionment for a franchise to construct its railroad on streets and avenues as described in its charter. May 29, 1909 it amended its petition. June 22, 1909, the Company withdrew its petitions. No further action has been taken in the matter.

Proceedings to dissolve Company. In the Company's report to the Public Service Commission for 1912, it stated that proceedings for dissolution were begun on February 24, 1912, and at that time the matter was before Howard C. Lake, as referee. June 25, 1913, the Company informed the Commission that these proceedings had not been terminated, and that no order or decree had been entered since the order referring the matter to Mr. Lake.

Construction. No record of any construction.

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