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porate life, 25 years; capital stock, $15,000; route (about 11/2 miles) as follows:

Beginning at or near the junction of Staten Island Railroad and Princes Bay avenue; thence through said avenue to Shore avenue, and thence through Shore avenue to a point at or near S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Company's works near Princes Bay shore.

January 5, 1898, the Company filed in the office of the secretary of state a certificate of convenience and necessity, obtained from the Railroad Commission December 22, 1897.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

556 Prospect Park and Clarkson St. Railroad Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. January 28, 1878; General Railroad Law of 1850; for purpose of constructing a street surface railroad; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $25,000; route (about one mile) as follows:

Commencing on Flatbush avenue near Malbone street, town of Flatbush; thence along Flatbush avenue or plank road to or near Lefferts avenue; thence along Lefferts avenue to near Rogers avenue; thence southerly to The Kings County Central Railroad near Clarkson street in Flatbush.

Maps. The Company filed in the register's office of Kings County maps as follows:

January 23, 1878, a map and profile of its route from Flatbush avenue, near Malbone street, to near Canarsie road and New York avenue; February 20, 1878, a map altering its original route; February 20, 1878, change of route between Clove road and Brooklyn avenue.

Stock. In the Company's last report to the state engineer for 1879 it stated that $2,450 of its capital stock had been subscribed, and $100 paid in.

Intercorporate relations. In the report made to the state engineer. for 1879 the Company stated that its leases of right of way had been assigned to The Kings County Central Railroad Company (no. 316); also that commissioners had been appointed by the Supreme Court on application by the Flatbush Turnpike Company to determine as to the feasibility of a change of route but that the matter at the time was undetermined. A search of the special proceeding records in Kings County does not disclose any report made by the Commission.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

557 Prospect Park and Coney Island Rail Road Company

(Brooklyn) Incorporation. March 14, 1867; General Railroad Law of 1850; corporate life, 50 years; capital stock, $150,000; route (about six miles) as follows:

From a point in the town of Flatbush adjoining the city of Brooklyn and near Prospect park to a point in and upon Coney Island in the town of Gravesend.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence. In the state engineer's report for 1882 this Company is described as in operation. This is no doubt an error. The report in all probability has reference to the later company (no. 558) with the same name incorporated October 9, 1874.

558 Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad Company

(Brooklyn)

Incorporation. October 9, 1874; General Railroad Law of 1850 and chapter 448, laws of 1874; as a consolidation of The Park Avenue Railroad Company (no. 540) and the Greenwood and Coney Island Railroad Company (no. 256); corporate life, 100 years; capital stock, $500,000; route (about 21 miles) as follows:

(1) Commencing at Fulton ferry, Brooklyn, and running through Water street to Bridge street, to Concord street, to Navy street, to Park avenue, to Vanderbilt avenue, to Prospect park and Ninth avenue, to Greenwood cemetery, returning through the same streets and avenues to Concord and Gold streets;

thence through Gold street to Front street, to Fulton street, to Fulton ferry; (2) commencing at Fulton ferry, through Water street to Washington street to Concord street, to Navy street, to Park avenue, to Broadway; (3) commencing at the Hamilton avenue ferry, through Hamilton avenue to 15th street, to Ninth avenue, to 19th and 20th streets at Greenwood cemetery, through 19th and 20th streets to 10th avenue, to Gravesend avenue, to Coney Island beach; (4) also from Hamilton avenue through Hicks street to Atlantic street to the South ferry.

Extension of route. November 8, 1886, the Company filed in the office of the secretary of state a certificate extending its route as follows:

Proposes to extend and construct a branch of its said railroad connecting therewith at the corner of Park avenue and Vanderbilt avenue in the city of Brooklyn, county of Kings, state of New York, through, across and along the following streets and avenues in said city:

Along Park avenue to Broadway, thence through, across and along Broadway in each direction to Park street and Locust street; and through and along Park street and Locust street with a single track in each street to Beaver street; through and along Beaver street and across Belvidere street to Bushwick avenue; thence through and along Bushwick avenue to Jefferson street, and through and along Jefferson street, crossing Evergreen avenue to Central avenue; and through and along Central avenue to the city line with a double track in each direction of said streets and avenues except on Park and Locust streets as aforesaid, and also through, along and upon any private property which said Company may acquire for the purpose and to construct such switches, etc.

And that said Company proposes and is duly authorized to operate its railroad and to use thereon cable traction power with all necessary mechanical appliances and contrivances from Fulton ferry over, across and along Fulton street to Front street, and also through and along Water street and Front street between Fulton street and Washington street; thence from Water street, through and along Washington street to Concord street; through and along Concord street, Navy street and Park avenue to Broadway, and thence through, along, across and over the streets and avenues hereinabove mentioned to the city line at the cemetery of the Evergreens.

Maps. The Company filed in the register's office of Kings County, maps as follows:

October 14, 1874, a route map; January 6, 1875, a map and profile of its route, also depot at Ninth avenue and 20th street; November 3, 1876, a map showing the terminus of the Company at Sheepshead Bay road; January 16, 1877, a map showing land required for depot purposes at 10th avenue between 19th and 20th streets; May 28, 1877, a supplemental map showing land required for corporate purposes on south side of Sheepshead Bay road, Coney Island; December 16, 1878, extension of its main line at Coney Island; February 15, 1886, two maps, one showing land at Coney Island near West End dock, and the other showing land required for corporate purposes at Surf avenue, Coney Island; June 7, 1887, map showing change of route, Third avenue between 38th and 39th streets to Gravesend avenue; November 28, 1887, a route map showing route from city line to Gravesend avenue, north of Lotts lane; December 11, 1889, map showing land required for right of way.

Right of way. By a series of deeds dated 1878, 1879, 1883, 1885 and 1886, and by judicial proceedings completed in 1880, the Company acquired right of way and terminal property in the town of Gravesend.

Depot. By a series of deeds and judicial proceedings in 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1887 and 1889 this Company acquired for depot purposes the property in the block bounded by Tenth avenue, Ninth avenue, 19th street and 20th street, near the entrance to Greenwood cemetery.

Special franchises. December 21, 1885, the common council of the city of Brooklyn authorized the Company to construct and operate its road as follows:

Commencing at Park avenue and Broadway and running thence across and along Broadway in each direction to Park street and Locust street, thence along Park street and Locust street with a single track in each street to Beaver street, thence along Beaver street and across Belvidere street to Bushwick avenue, thence along Bushwick avenue to Jefferson street, thence along Jefferson street and crossing Evergreen avenue to Central avenue, thence along Central avenue to the city line, with a double track everywhere except on Park and Locust streets; also along any private property acquired for

the purpose.

July 7, 1886, the common council of the city of Brooklyn authorized this Company and The Atlantic Avenue Railroad Company of Brooklyn to construct and operate by cable traction power, the street surface railroads then partly constructed and operated by horse power and to be further constructed and operated between Fulton ferry and the cemetery of the Evergreens, and to the southerly end of Ninth avenue, as follows:

From Fulton ferry along Fulton street and Front street to Washington street; also along Water street, Washington street, Concord street, Navy street, Park avenue, Broadway, Park and Locust streets, Beaver street, Belvidere street, Bushwick avenue, Melrose street, Jefferson street, Evergreen avenue and Central avenue to the city line, and returning over, along and through the same route or routes, streets and avenues to the Fulton ferry; also from Park avenue through Vanderbilt avenue, the Park Plaza and Ninth avenue to the southerly end of Ninth avenue.

The parties primarily interested in this authorization were Tom L. Johnson and Alexis I. Dupont, who had acquired from The Atlantic Avenue Railroad Company of Brooklyn, lessee of this Company, a sub-lease of the Park Avenue line for the purpose of the installation of a cable road. By subsequent resolutions of the Brooklyn common council under date of October 4 and October 11, 1886, the consent to the installation of cable traction upon the Park Avenue line, extending from Fulton ferry to Evergreen cemetery, was renewed with certain minor modifications of route between Broadway and the cemetery. The authorization of cables on the Vanderbilt Avenue line was omitted from these later resolutions.

Stock. The Company's report to the state engineer, 1875, stated that the entire authorized capital stock had been subscribed and paid in. February 27, 1880, the stockholders authorized the reduction of its capital stock from $500,000 to $250,000, and on March 3, 1880, a certificate of such reduction was filed in the secretary of state's office.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart IV, no. 57.) November 17, 1879, this Company took a lease of the railroad of The New York and Coney Island Railroad Company, extending from West Brighton Beach on Coney Island to the steamboat landing at Coney Island Point. The route of the New York and Coney Island Railroad was substantially identical with the extension which this Company had described in the map filed December 16, 1878. The lease refers to the New York and Coney Island Railroad as already constructed. This lease was to run for a term of 95 years from July 1, 1879, and this Company was to pay a yearly rental equal to 10 per cent upon the outstanding capital stock of the New York and Coney Island Company, such stock not to exceed $100,000. This rental was to be free and clear and exclusive of all taxes and assessments imposed by governmental authority on the stockholders or property of the lessor.

June 1, 1882, The Coney Island and Brooklyn Rail Road Company secured the right to use this Company's tracks on Ninth avenue from 15th street to this Company's depot at Greenwood cemetery, for a term of 21 years from June 1, 1882, free of rental. It was stipulated that if at any time the Coney Island and Brooklyn Company should use steam as a motive power on the southerly portion of its road from the intersection of Ninth avenue and 15th street, Brooklyn, to Coney Island Beach, then upon the option of either party this agreement might be terminated on six months' notice. The Coney Island and Brooklyn Company

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