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of New York, such company should have all the rights and privileges of the People's Traction Company under these agreements with The New York, Westchester and Connecticut Traction Company.

Change of motive power. November 25, 1902, the Railroad Commission authorized the Company to change its motive power to the overhead electric trolley system.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart I, no. 46.) April 10, 1900, the Company's franchises and routes were leased for a period of one year to The New York, Westchester and Connecticut Traction Company. November 29, 1901, they were leased to the Interurban Street Railway Company.

In February, 1902, the entire capital stock of this Company and of The New York, Westchester and Connecticut Traction Company was acquired by the Metropolitan Securities Company, which also owned the entire capital stock of the Interurban Street Railway Company

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

551
The Perth Amboy Railroad Company

(Richmond) Incorporation. May 5, 1885; General Railroad Law of 1850, and' chapter 582, laws of 1880; corporate life, 50 years; capital stock, $1,000,000; route (about two miles) as follows:

Commencing at or near Tottenville by connection with the Staten Island railroad; thence by the most direct and feasible route to the waters of the Arthur Kill, and thence by bridge over and across Arthur Kill to a point at or near Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

The Plank Road Railroad Company

(Queens) Incorporation. April 21, 1866; chapter 749, laws of 1866, which authorized the Company “to lay rails for the passage of railroad cars to be drawn by horses on the side of the Hempstead and Jamaica plank road from the terminus of the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road in the village of Jamaica, to any part or through any street, road or avenue in the village of Hempstead,

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upon obtaining the consent in writing of two-thirds of the property holders upon said street, road or avenue.'

The Company was also authorized to agree with companies, persons or authorities for legally obtaining, by purchase or otherwise, any road covered by this Company's route. The Company was also given the powers and privileges of turnpike corporations, and was authorized to collect the same tolls as were at that time allowed by law to the Hempstead and Jamaica plank road company. The Company was authorized to lay rails of such size and pattern as would be most suitable for its purposes. It was also given the right to consolidate with The East New York and Jamaica Rail Road Company and “the Jamaica and Brooklyn plank road company, or either of them, but in case of consolidation passengers carried on the railroad of The East New York and Jamaica Rail Road Company could not be charged more than seven cents " for two miles or less on the west end of said railroad.” The Company was authorized to run dummy engines, after obtaining the written consent of property owners along its line.

The authorized capital stock was $500,000, with the right to issue" as a part of said capital stock," bonds for the sum of $200,000 after $100,000 had been subscribed, paid in and expended on the construction of the road. The Company was given five years from July 1, 1866, to complete its road.

Extension of time to complete construction of road. By chapter 716, laws of 1871, the time for the completion of this Company's road was extended to July 1, 1874. By chapter 118, laws of 1874, the time for the completion of the road as far as Queens was extended to July 1, 1878. It was also provided that the Company should have " the power and privilege to continue and build the road to Hempstead any time before the first day of January, 1878."

Construction. No record is found of any construction having been undertaken, and no record of any reports by this Company to the state engineer can be found.

553 The Port Morris and Westchester Rail Road Company

(The Bronx) Incorporation. April 2, 1861; General Railroad Law; for purpose of constructing a single or double track railroad; corporate life, 50 years; capital stock, $250,000; route (about 11 miles) as follows:

From Port Morris on the best and most feasible route to the east side of the village of Westchester and from the east side of said village to the village of Eastchester, along or near to the Salt Meadows crossing Eastchester creek above the head of navigation of the same and continuing on to the village of New Rochelle.

Construction. No record of any construction. The report of the state engineer for 1878 stated that the Company was extinct.

554 The Port Richmond and Prohibition Park Electric

Railroad Company

(Richmond) Incorporation. December 4, 1891; The Railroad Law of 1890; for

purpose of constructing a street surface railroad to be operated by animal, cable, electricity, or any power other than locomotive steam power; corporate life, 50 years; capital stock, $50,000; route (about two miles) as follows:

Commencing from the village of Port Richmond, thence to the Prohibition park, which places will be its termini.

Maps. May 6, 1893, the Company filed in the county clerk's office of Richmond, a map and profile of proposed extension of route, “from Leonard avenue 'Prohibition park’ to Castleton corners.' No certificate of extension seems to have been filed for this proposed extension in the office of the secretary of state.

Special franchise. By contract dated February 1, 1892, entered into with the board of trustees of the village of Port Richmond, the Company received a franchise for a single track street surface railroad, to be operated solely by electricity, of the most approved pattern, commencing: on Jewett avenue from Richmond terrace on the shore road in the village of Port Richmond to the line between the villages of New Brighton and Port Richmond, and south therefrom to the main avenue or entrance of the Prohibition park on said avenue, and from said avenue entrance south on said Jewett avenue to the southerly side of the turnpike road.

This franchise was conditioned as follows:

Horse or locomotive steam power not to be used except that horse power may be used temporarily in case of emergency; company to build its road on the grade fixed by the street commissioner of the village, and to alter

and change the grade of its track or portion thereof when required so to do by the trustees of the village of Port Richmond or their successors, as often as the grade of the highways so constructed might be changed or altered; Company to pay annually the following percentages of its gross receipts for the franchise right:

One-quarter of one per cent for the second five years after the commencement of the operation of the railroad; one-half of one per cent for the second 10 years thereafter; three-quarters of one per cent for the balance or remainder of the term of the franchise. The contract does not limit the term of the franchise. Special provisions are included as to construction; operation of cars to be not less than 12 round trips between 8 A. M. and 9 P. M.; franchiise to become null and void and wholly cease and determine at any time at the option of the board of trustees of the village of Port Richmond or their successors upon failure of the Company to keep, observe and perform any of the conditions provided in the grant. Company is prohibited from constructing or extending its tracks or operating its road in that portion of the street or territory known as Richmond terrace to the station of the Staten Island Rapid Transit Railroad, without first obtaining the consent of the Staten Island Belt Line Railroad or an order from the court having jurisdiction thereof for the purpose.

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By contract dated February 1, 1892, entered into with the board of trustees of the village of New Brighton, the Company was granted a franchise for a single track street surface railroad

“ Jewett avenue south from Post avenue” in the village of New Brighton. The terms upon which this grant was given are substantially the same as outlined in the above paragraph. Tho Company was to construct before February 1, 1894.

By contract dated October 20, 1892, entered into with the town board of the town of Middletown, the Company was granted a franchise for a single track surface railroad commencing “ on Richmond turnpike east of Jewett avenue to the Manor road." The terms on which this contract was given are substantially the same as in the two previous grants.

By contract dated March 9, 1893, entered into with the board of trustees of the village of New Brighton, the Company was granted a franchise for a single track street surface railroad commencing“ on Richmond turnpike from Jewett avenue to the Manor road;" also the right to change the terminus from the junction of Jewett avenue with Richmond turnpike to the junction of Richmond turnpike with the Manor road. The terms of this grant are substantially the same as in the previous grants.

Stock. By a certificate filed in the office of the secretary of

state July 5, 1892, the Company increased its capital stock from $50,000 to $100,000, and March 5, 1895, by consent of the Railroad Commission from $100,000 to $200,000. Intercorporate relations.

(See also chart III, no. 50.) March 18, 1895, the Company was authorized to change its name on and after May 11, 1895, to the Staten Island Traction Company (no. 646). November 1, 1895, the Company's road was leased to the Staten Island Midland Railroad Company (no. 633). Subsequently, under foreclosure proceedings by deed dated June 8, 1898, the property and franchises of the Staten Island Traction Company were transferred to the Staten Island Midland Railroad Company.

Court of Appeals decision in re right to cross tracks. This Company had entered into an agreement with the Staten Island Belt Line Company whereby it acquired the right to run its cars over that portion of the latter's line which crossed tracks of the Staten Island Rapid Transit Railroad Company in Port Richmond. The Staten Island Rapid Transit Railroad Company maintained at this crossing a gate on each side of its tracks. This prevented the cars of The Port Richmond and Prohibition Park Electric Railroad Company from passing over the crossing. It appears that The Port Richmond and Prohibition Park Electric Railroad Company had operated over the crossing for about four months, but that such operation was under a temporary agreement pending negotiations, but that the negotiations were broken off and the permission was revoked. The Court of Appeals in a decision handed down January 15, 1895, (144 N. Y. 445) held that no permanent right accrued to The Port Richmond and Prohibition Park Electric Railroad Company from such temporary operation over the crossing of the tracks of the Staten Island Rapid Transit Railroad Company.

Construction. The Company appears to have constructed prior to its lease a one-track road from the Shore road, Port Richmond, to Prohibition Park, consisting of 1.443 miles of single track, and .23 of a mile of sidings.

555 The Princes Bay Rail Road Company

(Richmond) Incorporation. October 19, 1897; The Railroad Law; for purpose of constructing an electric street surface railway; cor

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