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514 The New York, Westchester and Connecticut Traction

Company

(The Bronx) Incorporation. February 12, 1895; General Street Railroad Law; for purpose of constructing a street surface railroad; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $600,000; route (about 16 miles) as follows:

From the intersection of the Boston Post road at the Bronx river to the intersection of the Boston Post road and Byram river at the easterly state Jine of the state of New York.

It is to be noted that at the date of this Company's incorporation its entire route lay within the limits of the county of Westchester, but that after the annexed district became a part of New York, June 6, 1895, a considerable portion of this route lay within the city limits, in what is now the borough of The Bronx, east of the Bronx river.

Extensions of route. March 22, April 17 and May 11, 1895; May 4, July 25, July 29, October 13, October 26, December 15, December 19, and December 27, 1898; January 28, March 22, April 19, July 18, and September 2, 1899, and January 10, 1900, this Company filed in the office of the secretary of state certificates of its route; these extensions are all outside of the Greater New York except that the first certificate of extension provided for the following routes in the City:

A route beginning at the intersection of Lafayette avenue and the Bronx river, and running through various streets and avenues to Pelhamville; a route beginning at the junction of Pelhamville avenue and the Old Boston Post road, running through various streets to the western limits of the town of Pelham; a route commencing at the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Pelham at the Eastern boulevard and running through various streets to Main street in the village of New Rochelle; a route commencing from the intersection of the Boston Post road and the southwesterly boundary line of the village of New Rochelle, and running through various streets to the northeasterly limits of the village of New Rochelle.

Special franchises. March 25, 1895, the highway commissioner of the town of Westchester granted the Company consent to construct its road upon the following streets :

On the Boston Post road from the Bronx river to the northeasterly limits of the town of Westchester; on the Eastern boulevard from Avenue E in Unionport, across the bridge over Westchester creek to Ferry avenue, thence along the Eastern boulevard in its various courses and windings to the

point where it intersects the boundary line between the town of Westchester and Pelham.

This grant was conditional upon the Company complying with terms as set forth in the consent. The franchise was formally accepted by the Company March 30, 1895.

April 1, 1895, the highway commissioner of the town of Eastchester gave the Company consent for the construction and operation of a railroad along the following route:

On the Boston Post road from the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Westchester to the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Eastchester.

This route lay entirely within the boundaries of the village of Eastchester, which had been incorporated a week previous to the grant. For this reason the franchise was probably invalid, as being outside the jurisdiction of the town authorities.

April 8, 1895, the commissioner of highways of the town of Pelham granted the Company consent for the construction and operation of a railroad upon several routes, of which the following are now partly within the limits of Greater New York:

On Boston turnpike or Pelham road from the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Eastchester to the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Pelham; on the Eastern boulevard or Pelham road from the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Westchester to the northeasterly boundary line of the town of Pelham,

The grant was conditional and subject to forfeiture if the control of the Company ever directly or indirectly should be acquired by the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company or the “Union Railroad.” This franchise was formally accepted by the Company May 7, 1895. In accepting the franchise it restated the conditions of the grant, but modified one of them. In the provision for the forfeiture of the grant, in case the Company fell under the control of The New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, or the Union Railroad, all references to the Union Railroad was omitted.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart I, no. 47.) March 13 and May 7, 1895, and June 8, 1895, the Company entered into agreements with the Peoples' Traction Company of the City of New York, whereby arrangements were made for the exchange of passengers and for the operation of through cars by this Company over the Traction Company's lines. April 10, 1900, the Company took a lease of the franchises and rights of the Peoples' Traction Company of the City of New York for a period of one year.

December 9, 1901, the Company leased its property and franchises to the Interurban Street Railway Company. About February, 1902, the entire capital stock of the Company and also of the People's Traction Company was acquired by the Metropolitan Securities Company, which also acquired at the same time the entire capital stock of the Interurban Street Railway Company The Company's road continued to be operated by the Interurban Street Railway Company and the New York City Railway Company until September 21, 1907, when operation was assumed by Adrian H. Joline and Douglas Robinson, receivers for the New York City Railway Company. August 1, 1908, Joline and Robinson, having been appointed separate receivers for the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, the operation of the New York City Railway Company's own line and the New York, Westchester and Connecticut Traction Company's lines in Westchester County, was assumed by William W. Ladd, the new receiver for the New York City Railway Company.

Construction. The Company never completed the construction of any tracks within the limits of Greater New York. However, on the Old Boston Post Road, on the northern boundary line of the city, it laid a single track for a distance of 700 feet.

515 New York, Westchester and Putnam Railway Company

(The Bronx) Incorporation. July 3, 1877; General Railroad Law of 1850, and chapter 430, laws of 1874; as a reorganization of The New York and Boston Rail Road Company (no. 401); capital stock, $5,380,900; route the same as that of the former company. The incorporators of the Company acquired the property of its predecessor at the sale under foreclosure of the mortgage to The Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure entered in the office of the clerk of the county of Westchester.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart VI, no. 35.) March 21, 1878, this Company leased its road to The New York City and Northern Rail-road Company, which on the same day acquired a majority interest in the stock of the Company.

516 The New York, Woodhaven and Rockaway

Railroad Company

(Queens)

Incorporation. March 21, 1877; General Railroad Law of 1850; for purpose of constructing a narrow gauge single or double track railroad from Long Island City to Rockaway Beach; corporate life, 100 years; capital stock, $600,000; route (about 15 miles), as follows:

Commencing at a point at or near the intersection of Third and Front streets in Long Island City, and running thence along Third street, across Van Alst avenue to Meadow street; thence through Meadow street to Bridge street; thence by the most practicable and feasible line to the village of Winfield; thence by direct line as far as practicable to Maspeth, Columbusville, Middle Village, Glendale and Woodhaven; thence by the most practicable route to the junction of Hawtree creek and Jamaica bay; thence crossing Jamaica bay to Brant point, and thence crossing the meadows to Rocka

way Beach,

May 22, 1879, the Company filed in the office of the secretary of state a certificate amending its articles of incorporation by changing the gauge of its road to 4 feet 81/2 inches (standard gauge).

Maps. The Company filed in the county clerk's office of Queens County

July 3, 1879, a map of its route across Jamaica bay; October 13, 1879, a map of its route from the East river to Rockaway Beach; January 20, 1880, a map of its route from its junction with the Flushing Railroad in Arch street, Long Island City, to Woodhaven; February 18, 1880, a map of its route along the aqueduct from its main line to East New York; September 16, 1880, a map of its extension on Rockaway Beach to the westerly end of the same; September 27, 1880, a map of its extension from Hammels to Far Rockaway and to Far Rockaway inlet; January 24, 1881, a map of its connection with the Long Island Railroad at Woodhaven. There is a record of the filing by the Company of a map in the office of the register of Kings County on February 17, 1880, presumably of the Brooklyn branch, but this map has been lost.

Special franchises. In the Company's report for 1877 to the state engineer it was stated that a survey and profile map of the line of the proposed road had been made and that necessary legislation had been obtained from the board of supervisors of Queens County to authorize the construction of draw bridges across the navigable waters of Jamaica bay, and also that a right

of way for a considerable portion of the line had been contracted for.

Stock. In 1877 it appears that $28,000 of capital stock had been subscribed and $1,860 paid in. In 1878, $800 more of capital stock had been paid in. May 15, 1879, the Company's authorized capital stock was increased by vote of stockholders from $600,000 to $1,000,000. In 1880 it appears that the amount of capital stock at that time subscribed and paid in was $900,000. In a report for the year ending December 31, 1881, it was stated that the authorized capital stock had been increased from $1,000,000 to $2,000,000, due to a reorganization of the Company. In 1885 it was stated that there was outstanding at that time $1,000,000 of capital stock.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart V, no. 14.) March 26, 1880, by an agreement entered into with The Long Island Railroad Company the Company agreed to complete its line of double track railroad from Woodhaven northerly to a connection with the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad between Richmond Hill and Glendale not later than May 31, 1880, and to furnish Receiver Sharp with funds for constructing a second track parallel with the existing track of the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad, from Fresh Pond station to Hunter's Point, this second track also to be completed by May 31, 1880. In consideration The Long Island Railroad Company granted to this Company trackage rights from Fresh Pond to Bushwick and Long Island City for a period of 50 years, together with other rights and privileges in connection with the construction and operation of this line. By another agreement entered into with the Jamaica and Brooklyn Road Company on April 24, 1880, the Company acquired a perpetual right to maintain an elevated bridge over the Jamaica and Brooklyn road in the town of Jamaica, a short distance east of the dwelling house of John Napier. The bridge was to be erected and maintained at this Company's sole expense. By a second agree ment, entered into December 22, 1883, the agreement of March 26, 1880, with The Long Island Railroad Company already described, was modified, dating from May 1, 1881. The Company's rights under this agreement were to expire 50 years after October 1, 1879, instead of 50 years from the date of the original agree

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