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Fingal comes the first of men, the breaker of the shields ! The waves foam before his black prows ! His masts with sails are like groves in clouds ?" " Blow,” said Cuthullin, “ blow ye winds that rush along my isle of mist. Come to the death of thousands, O king of resounding Selma! Thy sails, my friend, are to me the clouds of the morning; thy ships the light of heaven; and thou thyself a pillar of fire that beams on the world by night. O Connal, first of men, how pleasing, in grief, are our friends ! But the night is gathering around! Where now are the ships of Fingal ? Here let us pass the hours of darkness; here wish for the moon of heaven.”

The winds come down on the woods. The torrents rush from the rocks. Rain gathers round the head of Cromla. The red stars tremble between the flying clouds. Sad, by the side of a stream whose sound is echoed by a tree, sad by the side of a stream the chief of Erin sits. Connal son of Colgar Is there, and Carril of other times. Unhappy is he hand of Cuthullin,” said the son of Semo, “unappy is the hand of Cuthullin, since he slew his iend ! Ferda, son of Damman, I loved thee as myIf !How, Cuthullin, son of Semo! how fell the eaker of the shields ? Well I remember,” said Con; “ the son of the noble Damman. Tall and fair was like the rain-bow of heaven.Ferda from ion came, the chief of a hundred bills. In

Muri's* hall he learned the sword, and won the friendship of Cuthullin. We moved to the chace together: one was our bed in the heath!

Deugala was the spouse of Cairbar, chief of the plains of Ullin. She was covered with the light of beauty, but her heart was the house of pride. She loved that sun-beam of youth, the son of noble Damman. “Cairbar,” said the white-armed Deugala, “ give me half of the herd. No more I will remain in your halls. Divide the herd, dark Cairbar !" " Let Cuthullin,” said Cairbar, “ divide my herd on the hill. His breast is the seat of justice. Depart, thou light of beauty !” I went and divided the herd. One snow-white bull remained. I gave that bull to Cairbar. The wrath of Deugala rose !

« Son of Damman,” begun the fair, “ Cuthullin hath pained my soul. I must hear of his death, or Lubar’s stream shall roll over me. My pale ghost shall wander near thee, and mourn the wound of my pride. Pour out the blood of Cuthullin or pierce this heaving breast.” “ Deugala,” said the fair-haired youth, “ how shall I slay the son of Semo? He is the friend of my secret thoughts. Shall I then lift the sword ?” She wept three days before the chief, on the fourth he said he would fight. “I will fight my friend, Deugala! but may I fall by his sword ! Could I wander on the hill alone? Could I behold the grave of Cuthullin ?" We fought on the plain of

* A place in Ulster.

Muri. Our swords avoid a wound. They slide on the helmets of steel; or sound on the slippery shields. Deugala was near with a smile, and said to the son of Damman : “ Thine arm is feeble, sun-beam of youth! Thy years are not strong for steel. Yield to the son of Semo. He is a rock on Malmor.” .“ The tear is in the eye of youth. He faultering said to me: “ Cuthullin, raise thy bossy shield. Defend thee from the hand of thy friend. My soul is laden with grief: for I must slay the chief of men!” I sighed as the wind in the cleft of a rock. I lifted high the edge of my steel. The sun-beam of battle fell : the first of Cuthullin's friends ! Unhappy is the hand of Cuthullin since the hero fell !

“ Mournful is thy tale, son of the car,” said Carril of other times. “ It sends my soul back to the ages of old, to the days of other years. Often have I heard of Comal, who slew the friend he loved; yet victory attended his steel : the battle was consumed in his presence !

Comal was a son of Albion ; the chief of an hundred hills ! His deer drunk of a thousand streams. A thousand rocks replied to the voice of his dogs. His face was the mildness of youth. His hand the death of heroes. One was his love, and fair was she ! the daughter of mighty Conloch. She appeared like a sun-beam among women. Her hair was the wing of the raven. Her dogs were taught to the chace. Her bow-string sounded on the winds. Her soul

Mari. Our swords avoid a wound. They slide on the helmets of steel; or sound on the slippery shields. Deugala was near with a smile, and said to the son of Damman: Thine arm is feeble, sun-beam of youth! Thy years are not strong for steel. Yield to the son of Semo. He is a rock on Malmor."

The tear is in the eye of youth. He faultering said to me: “ Cuthullin, raise thy bossy shield. Detend thee from the hand of thy friend. My soul is laden with grief: for I must slay the chief of men!" I sighed as the wind in the cleft of a rock. I lifted high the edge of my steel. The sun-beam of battle fell: the first of Cuthullin's friends ! Unhappy is the hand of Cuthullin since the hero fell !

“Mournful is thy tale, son of the car,” said Carril of other times. “ It sends my soul back to the ages of old, to the days of other years. Often have I heard of Comal, who slew the friend he loved; yet victory attended his steel : the battle was consumed in his presence!

Comal was a son of Albion ; the chief of an hunred hills ! His deer drunk of a thousand streams. thousand rocks replied to the voice of his dogs. s face was the mildness of youth. His hand the ath of heroes. One was his love, and fair was she !

daughter of mighty Conloch. She appeared like -n-beam among women. Her hair was the wing he raven. Her dogs were taught to the chace. bow-string sounded on the winds. Her soul

was fixed on Comal. Often met their eyes of love. Their course in the chace was one. Happy were their words in secret. But Grumal loved the maid, the dark chief of the gloomy Ardven. He watched her lone steps in the heath; the foe of unhappy Comal!

One day, tired of the chace, when the mist had concealed their friends, Comal and the daughter of Conloch met, in the cave of Ronan. It was the wonted haunt of Comal. Its sides were hung with his arms. A hundred shields of thongs were there; a hundred helms of sounding steel. “ Rest here,” he said, “ my love Galbina : thou light of the cave of Ronan! A deer appears on Mora's brow. Igo; but I will soon return.” “I fear,” she said, “ dark Grumal my foe: he haunts the cave of Ronan! I will rest among the arms; but soon return, my love."

He went to the deer of Mora. The daughter of Conloch would try his love. She cloathed her fair sides with his armour ; she strode from the cave of Ronan! He thought it was his foe. His heart beat high. His colour changed, and darkness dimmed his eyes. He drew the bow. The arrow flew. Galbina fell in blood ! He run with wildness in his steps : he called the daughter of Conloch. No answer in the lonely rock. Where art thou, O my love? He saw, at length, her heaving heart, beating around the arrow he threw. " O Conloch's daughter, is it thou ? He sunk upon her breast! The hunters found the

hapless pair ; he afterwards walked the hill. But many and silent were his steps round the dark dwelling of his love. The fleet of the ocean came. He fought, the strangers fled. He searched for death along the field. But who could slay the mighty Comal ! He threw away his dark-brown shield. An arrow found his manly breast. He sleeps with his loved Galbina at the noise of the sounding surge! Their green tombs are seen by the mariner, when he bounds on the waves of the north,

FINGAL:

hapless pair; he afterwards walked the hill. But many and silent were his steps round the dark dwelling of his love. The fleet of the ocean came. He fought, the strangers fled. He searched for death along the field. But who could slay the mighty Comal ! He threw away his dark-brown shield. An arrow found his manly breast. He sleeps with his loved Galbina at the noise of the sounding surge! Their green tombs are seen by the mariner, when he bounds on the waves of the north,

AN

ANCIENT EPIC POEM.

IN SIX BOOKS.

ARGUMENT TO BOOK UIT. Cuthullin, pleased with the story of Carril, insists with that bard for more of his songs. He relates the actions of Fingal in Lochlin, and death of Agandecca the beautiful sister of Swaran. He had scarce finished when Calmar the son of Matha, who had advised the first battle, came wounded from the field, and told them of Swaran's design to surprise the remains of the Irish army. He himself proposes to withstand singly the whole force of the enemy, in a narrow pass, till the Irish should make good their retreat. Cuthullin, touched with the gallant proposal of Calmar, resolves to accompany him, and orders Carril to carry off the few that remained of the Irish. Morning comes, Calmar dies of his wounds; and, the ships of the Caledonians appearing, Swaran gives over the pursuit of the Irish, and returns to oppose Fingal's landing. . Cuthullin ashamed, after his defeat, to appear before Fingal, retires to the cave of Tura. Fingal engages the enemy, puts them to flight; but the coming on of night makes the victory not decisive. The king, who had observed the gallant behaviour of his grandson Oscar, gives him advices concerning his conduct in peace and war. He recommends to him to place the example of his fathers before his eyes, as the best model for his conduct; which introduces the episode concerning Fainasollis, the daughter of the king of Craca, whom Fingal had taken under his protection, in his youth. Fillan and Oscar are dispatched to ob.

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