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“ I came to Tura's bay : but the halls of Tura were silent. I looked around, and there was none to tell of the son of generous Semo. I went to the hall of shells, where the arms of his fathers hung. But the arms were gone, and aged Lamhor* sat in tears. “Whence are the arms of steel ?" said the rising Lamhor. “ The light of the spear has long been absent from Tura's dusky walls. Come ye from the rolling sea ? Or from Temora's + mournful halls ?”

We come from the sea," I said, “ from Usnoth’s rising towers. We are the sons of Slissáma,f the daughter of car-borne Semo. Where is Tura's chief, son of the silent hall ? But why should Nathos ask? for I behold thy tears. How did the mighty fall, son of the lonely Tura? “He fell not,” Lamhor replied, “ like the silent star of night, when it flies thro' darkness and is no more. But he was like a meteor that shoots into a distant land. Death attends its dreary course. Itself is the sign of wars. Mournful are the banks of Lego; and the roar of streamy Lara ! There the hero fell, son of the noble Usnoth !” “ The hero fell in the midst

* Lamh-mhor, mighty hand.

of Temora was the residence of the supreme kings of Ireland. It is here called mournful, on account of the death of Cormac, who was murdered there by Cairbar, who usurped his ihrone.

Slis-seamha, soft bosom. She was the wife of Usnoth, and daughter of Semo the chief of the isle of mist.

I came to Tura's bay : but the halls of Tura were silent. I looked around, and there was none to tell of the son of generous Semo. I went to the ball of shells, where the arms of his fathers hung. But the arms were gone, and aged Lamhor* sat in cars. “Whence are the arms of steel ?" said the ising Lamhor. " The light of the spear has long -en absent from Tura’s dusky walls. Come ye m the rolling sea ? Or from Temora's † mournful 11s ?" ** We come from the sea,” I said, “ from Ush's rising towers. We are the sons of Slis-2,the daughter of car-borne Semo. Where is

a's chief, son of the silent hall ? But why should hos ask? for I behold thy tears. How did the aty fall, son of the lonely Tura? “He fell - Lamhor replied, “ like the silent star of night,

it flies thro' darkness and is no more. But he . Fike a meteor that shoots into a distant land. attends its dreary course. Itself is the sign of Mournful are the banks of Lego; and the

streamy Lara ! There the hero fell, son of ole Usnoth!” “The hero fell in the midst

of slaughter,” I said with a bursting sigh. “ His hand was strong in war. Death dimly sat behind his sword.”

We came to Lego's sounding banks. We found his rising tomb. His friends in battle are there : his bards of many songs. Three days we mourned over the hero : on the fourth, I struck the shield of Caithbat. The heroes gathered around with joy, and shook their beamy spears. Corlath was near with his host, the friend of car-borne Cairbar. We came like a stream by night. His heroes fell before us. When the people of the valley rose, they saw their blood with morning's light. But we rolled away, like wreaths of mist, to Cormac's echoing hall. Our swords rose to defend the king. But Temora's halls were empty. Cormac had fallen in his youth. The king of Erin was no more!

Sadness seized the sons of Erin. They slowly, gloomily retired : like clouds that, long having threatened rain, vanish behind the hills. The sons of Usnoth moved, in their grief, towards Tura's sounding bay. We passed by Seláma. Cairbar retired like Lano's mist, when driven before the winds. It was then I beheld thee, O Dar-thula ! like the light of Etha's sun. “ Lovely is that beam !” I said. The crowded sigh of my bosom rose. “Thou camest in thy beauty, Dar-thula, to Etha's mournful chief. But the winds have deceived us, daughter of Colla, and the foe is near !”

h-mhor, mighty hand. ora was the residence of the supreme kings of Ireis here called mournful, on account of the death of iho was murdered there by Cairbar, who usurped his

imha, soft bosom. She was the wife of Usnoth, er of Semo the chief of the isle of mist.

Yes, the foe is near,” said the rushing strength of Althos. * “ I heard their clanging arms on the coast. I saw the dark wreaths of Erin's standard. Distinct is the voice of Cairbar.t Loud as Cromla's falling stream. He had seen the dark ship on the sea, before the dusky night came down. His people watch on Lena's plain. They lift ten thousand swords.” “ And let them lift ten thousand swords,” said Nathos with a smile. “ The sons of car-borne Usnoth will never tremble in danger! Why dost thou roll with all thy foam, thou roaring sea of Erin? Why do ye rustle, on your dark wings, ye whistling storms of the sky? Do ye think, ye storms, that ye keep Nathos on the coast ? No: his soul detains him, children of the night! Althos ! bring my father's arms : thou seest them beaming to the stars. Bring the spear of Semo. I It stands in the darkbosomed ship!”

* Althos had just returned from viewing the coast of Lena, whither he had been sent by Nathos, the beginning of the night.

of Cairbar had gathered an army, to the coast of Ulster, in order to oppose Fingal, who prepared for an expedition into Ireland to re-establish the house of Cormac on the throne, which Cairbar had usurped. Between the wings of Cairbar's army was the bay of Tura, into which the ship of the sons of Usnoth was driven: so that there was no possibility of their escaping

Semo was grandfather to Nathos by the mother's side. The spear mentioned here was given to Usnoth on his marriage, it being the custom then for the father of the lady to give his arms to his son-in-law.

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“Yes, the foc is near," said the rushing strength of Althos. * " I heard their clanging arms on the coast. I saw the dark wreaths of Erin's standard. Distinct is the voice of Cairbar.t Loud as Cromla's falling stream. He had seen the dark ship on the sea, before the dusky night came down. His people Hatch on Lena's plain. They lift ten thousand swords.” “And let them lift ten thousand swords," said Nathos with a smile. “The sons of car-borne l'snath will never tremble in danger ! Why dost thou wl with all thy foam, thou roaring sea of Erin? Thy do ye rustle, on your dark wings, ye whistling orms of the sky? Do ye think, ye storms, that . keep Nathos on the coast? No: his soul detains m, children of the night! Althos ! bring my fa

r's arms : thou seest them beaming to the stars. ing the spear of Semo. I It stands in the darkomed ship!"

He brought the arms. Nathos covered his limbs, in all their shining steel. The stride of the chief is lovely. The joy of his eyes was terrible. He looks towards the coming of Cairbar. The wind is rustling in his hair. Dar-thula is silent at his side. Her look is fixed on the chief. She strives to hide the rising sigh. Two tears swell in her radiant eyes!

“Althos !” said the chief of Etha. “ I see a cave in that rock. Place Dar-thula there. Let thy arm, my brother, be strong. Ardan! we meet the foe; call to battle gloomy Cairbar. O that he came in his sounding steel, to meet the son of Usnoth! -Darthula! if thou shalt escape, look not on the fallen Nathos ! Lift thy sails, O Althos ! towards the echoing groves of my land.

- Tell the chief, * that his son fell with fame; that my sword did not shun the fight. Tell him I fell in the midst of thousands. Let the joy of his grief be great. Daughter of Colla! call the maids to Etha's echoing hall! Let their songs arise for Nathos, when shadowy autumn returns. O that the voice of Cona, that Ossian, might be heard in my praise ! then would my spirit rejoice in the midst of the rushing winds.” “ And my voice shall praise thee, Nathos, chief of the woody Etha! The voice of Ossian shall rise in thy praise, son of the generous Usnoth! Why was I not on Lena, when the

* Usnoth.

Elkbos had just returned from viewing the coast of Lena,

er he had been sent by Nathos, the beginning of the

'airbar had gathered an army, to the coast of Ulster, in o oppose Fingal, who prepared for an expedition into Ire- re-establish the house of Cormac on the throne, which

had usurped. Between the wings of Cairbar's army · bay of Tura, into which the ship of the sons of Usas driven: so that there was no possibility of their

20 was grandfather to Nathos by the mother's side. r mentioned here was given to Usnoth on his marriage, he custom then for the father of the lady to give his is son-in-law,

battle rose? Then would the sword of Ossian defend thee; or himself fall low !”.

We sat, that night, in Selma round the strength of the shell. The wind was abroad, in the oaks. The spirit of the mountain * roared. The blast came rustling thro' the hall, and gently touched my harp. The sound was mournful and low, like the song of the tomb. Fingal heard it the first. The crowded sighs of his bosom rose. “Some of my heroes are low," said the grey-haired king of Morven. “I hear the sound of death on the harp. Ossian, touch the trembling string. Bid the sorrow rise; that their spirits may fly, with joy, to Morven's woody hills !" I touched the harp before the king, the sound was mournful and low. “Bend forward from your clouds,” I said, “ghosts of my fathers ! bend. Lay by the red terror of your course. Receive the falling chief; whether he comes from a distant land, or rises from the rolling sea. Let his robe of mist be near; his spear that is formed of a cloud. Place an halfextinguished meteor by his side, in the form of the hero's sword. And, oh! let his countenance be lovely, that his friends may delight in his presence. Bend from your clouds,” I said, “ ghosts of my fathers! bend !”

Such was my song, in Selma, to the lightly

* By the spirit of the mountain is meant that deep and me lancholy sound which precedes a storm; well known to those who live in a high country.

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