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Brojne kazens, fatou the spese

* Hezetan rest ia bis zarrow kcase *16c i Leo. The teebie w tad bis Pri bice: C: 2 be acie to bead it. His Sigbuc ; his bcass, which be pune, pce. Fizis the area of batte!

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T ebo, rests of the king of Morten! 1:05, 53k : $1233, to seed the right away on T E S , Csar, ad R-70, fly over the heath * L . Waze, R:27, art thou, young son of 1. Tha art cot woat to be the last to answer thy :r's voice !” “ Ryno," said Clin first of bards, “is with the in furms of his fathers. With Trathal king of

ds; with Trenmor of mighty deeds. The youth = *, the youth is pale, he lies on Lena's heath!"

the swiftest in the race," said the king, the to bend the bow. Thou scarce hast been known up? why did young Ryno fall? But sleep thou

on Lena, Fingal shall soon behold thee. Soon my voice be heard no more, and my footsteps to be seen. The bards will tell of Fingal's

The stones will talk of me. But, Ryno, thou v indeed! thou hast not received thy fame. strike the harp for Ryno; tell what the chief have been. Farewel, thou first in every field; e shall I direct thy dart! Thou that hast

The fair! I behold thee not. Farewel.

tear is on the cheek of the king, for terrible was his son in war. His son! that was like a beam of fire by night on a hill; when the forests sink down in its course, and the traveller trembles at the sound ! But the winds drive it beyond the steep. It sinks from sight, and darkness prevails.

“Whose fame is in that dark-green tomb?” begun the king of generous shells. “ Four stones with their heads of moss stand there! They mark the narrow house of death. Near it let Ryno rest. A neighbour to the brave let him lie. Some chief of fame is here, to fly, with my son, on clouds. O Ullin ! raise the songs of old. Awake their memory in their tomb. If in the field they never fled, my son shall rest by their side. He shall rest, far-distant from Morven, on Lena's resounding plains !"

“Here," said the bard of song, “here rest the first of heroes. Silent is Lamderg * in this place : dumb is Ullin, king of swords : And who, soft smiling from her cloud, shews me her face of love? Why, daughter, why so pale art thou, first of the maids of Cromla ? Dost thou sleep with the foes in battle? white-bosomed daughter of Tuathal. Thou hast been the love of thousands, but Lamderg was thy love. He came to Tura's mossy towers, and, striking his dark buckler, spoke :” “Where is Gelchossa, my love, the daughter of the noble Tuathal? I left her

* Lamh-dhearg signifies bloody hand. Gelchossa, white legged. Tuathal, surly. Ulfadda, long beard. Ferchios, the conqueror of men.

in the hall of Tura, when I fought with great Ulfada. Return soon, O Lamderg! she said, for here I sit in grief. Her white breast rose with sighs. Her cheek was wet with tears. But I see her not coming to meet me; to sooth my soul after war. Silent is the hall of my joy! I hear not the voice of the bard. Bran * does not shake his chains at the gate, glad at the coming of Lamderg. Where is Gelchossa, my love, the mild daughter of the generous Tuathal ?”

“ Lamderg!” says Ferchios son of Aidon, “ Gelchossa moves stately on Cromla. She and the maids of the bow pursue the flying deer!” “Ferchios !" replied the chief of Cromla, “no noise meets the ear of Lamderg! No sound is in the woods of Lena. No deer fly in my sight. No panting dog pursues. I see not Gelchossa my love, fair as the full moon setting on the hills. Go, Ferchios, go to Allad, † the greyhaired son of the rock. His dwelling is in the circle of stones. He may know of the bright Gelchossa !"

“ The son of Aidon went. He spoke to the ear of age. Allad ! dweller of rocks : thou that tremblest alone! what saw thine eyes of age?” “I saw,"

* Bran is a common name of grey-hounds to this day. It is a custom in the north of Scotland, to give the names of the heroes mentioned in this poem, to their dogs; a proof that they are familiar to the ear, and their fame generally known.

of Allad is a druid: he is called the son of the rock, from his dwelling in a cave; and the circle of stones here mentioned is the pale of the druidical temple. He is here consulted as one who had a supernatural knowledge of things; from the druids, no doubt, came the ridiculous notion of the second sight, which prevailed in the highlands and isles.

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s e za gas La cccazci Lasiz. i Geoise. I 1e, bed ge cine genus Tor?" “ Lazderz?" ses Festas sed dic, “Go 1-63 mores state ca Cres. Se ai e mic Le buw persoe ve Erez deer!" "F " and the chief of Croatia, “Do Dutse pes the of Lamderg! Xo sound is in the wood of Law drer fiy in my sight. No paning dog parices. I Got Gelchossa my love, fair as the far moco seton the hills. Go, Ferchios, go to Alld, the grere d son of the rock. His dwelling is in the corde opies. He may know of the bright Gelcbosa!" The son of Aidon went. He spoke to the ear of Allad! dweller of rocks : thou ibat tremblest what saw thine eyes of age?I saw,"

answered Allad the old, “ Ullin the son of Cairbar. He came, in darkness, from Cromla. He hummed a surly song, like a blast in a leafless wood. He entered the hall of Tura. “ Lamderg," he said, “most dreadful of men, fight or yield to Ullin.” “ Lamderg," replied Gelchossa; “ the son of battle, is not here. He fights Ulfada mighty chief. He is not here, thou first of men ! But Lamderg never yields. He will fight the son of Cairbar!” “Lovely art thou,” said terrible Ullin, “ daughter of the generous Tuathal. I carry thee to Cairbar's halls. The valiant shall have Gelchossa. Three days I remain on Cromla, to wait that son of battle, Lamderg. On the fourth Gelchossa is mine ; if the mighty Lamderg flies.”

“ Allad !” said the chief of Cromla, “ peace to thy dreams in the cave. Ferchios, sound the horn of Lamderg, that Ullin may hear in his halls.” Lamderg, like a roaring storm, ascended the hill from Tura. He hummed a surly song as he went, like the noise of a falling stream. He darkly stood upon the hill, like a cloud varying its form to the wind. He rolled a stone, the sign of war. Ullin heard in Cairbar's hall. The hero heard, with joy, his foe. He took his father's spear. A smile brightens his dark-brown cheek, as he places his sword by his side. The dagger glittered in his hand. He whistled as he went.

Gelchossa saw the silent chief, as a wreath of mist ascending the hill. She struck her white and heaving breast; and silent, tearful, feared for Lamderg.

o is a common name of grey-bounds to this day, It is

in the north of Sco:land, to give the names of the betioned in this poem, to their dogs; a proof that they ar to the ear, and their fame generally known. t is a druid: he is called the son of the rock, from his na cave; and the circle of stones here mentioned is

the druidical temple. He is bere consulted as one supernatural knowledge of things; from the druics, came the ridiculous notion of the second sight, which i the highlands and isles.

• Cairbar, hoary chief of shells,” said the maid of the tender hand, “ I must bend the bow on Cromla. I see the dark-brown hinds !" She hasted up the hill. In vain! the gloomy heroes fought. Why should I tell to Selma's king, how wrathful heroes fight? Fierce Ullin fell. Young Lamderg came, all pale to the daughter of generous Tuathal! “ What blood, my love?" she trembling said: “what blood runs down my warrior's side?" “ It is Ullin's blood," the chief replied, “ thou fairer than the snow ! Gelchossa, let me rest here a little while.” The mighty Lamderg died! “ And sleepest thou so soon on earth, O chief of shady Tura?” Three days she mourned beside her love. The hunters found her cold. They raised this tomb above the three. Thy son, O king of Morven, may rest here with heroes !

“ And here my son shall rest,” said Fingal. “ The voice of their fame is in mine ears. Fillan and Fergus! bring hither Orla; the pale youth of the stream of Lota! Not unequalled shall Ryno lie in earth, when Orla is by his side. Weep, ye daughters of Morven ! ye maids of the streamy Lota weep! Like a tree they grew on the hills. They have fallen like the oak of the desert ; when it lies across a stream, and withers in the wind. Oscar! chief of every youth ! thou seest how they have fallen. Be thou like them, on earth renowned. Like them the song of bards. Terrible were their forms in battle; but calm was Ryno in the days of peace. He was like the bow of the shower

" Cairbar, hoary chief of shells,” said the maid of the tender hand, “ I must bend the bow on Cromla. I see the dark-brown hinds !” She hasted up the hill. In vain! the gloomy heroes fought. Why should I tell to Selma's king, how wrathful heroes fight? Fierce Cilin fell. Young Landerg came, all pale to the daugh. ter of generous Tuathal! “ What blood, my love?" he trembling said: “what blood runs down my warer's side?" “ It is Ullin's blood," the chief replied, thou fairer than the snow! Gelchossa, let me rest re a little while.” The mighty Lamderg died! And sleepest thou so soon on earth, O chief of shady ira ?” Three days she mourned beside her love. e hunters found her cold. They raised this tomb we the three. Thy son, O king of Morven, may 1 here with heroes !

And here my son shall rest,” said Fingal. “The e of their fame is in mine ears. Fillan and FerI bring hither Orla; the pale youth of the stream sta! Not unequalled shall Ryno lie in earth, when is by his side. Weep, ye daughters of Morven ! ids of the streamy Lota weep! Like a tree they in the hills. They have fallen like the oak of the i when it lies across a stream, and withers in nd. Oscar! chief of every youth ! thou seest ey have fallen. Be thou like them, on earth d. Like them the song of bards. Terrible ir forms in battle ; but calm was Ryno in the

AN EPIC POEM. 127, seen far distant on the stream; when the sun is setting on Mora; when silence dwells on the hill of deer. Rest, youngest of my sons ! rest, O Ryno ! on Lena. We too shall be no more. Warriors one day must fall !"

Such was thy grief, thou king of swords, when Ryno lay on earth. What must the grief of Ossian be, for thou thyself art gone ! I hear not thy distant voice on Cona. My eyes perceive thee not. Often forlorn and dark I sit at thy tomb; and feel it with my hands. When I think I hear thy voice, it is but the passing blast. Fingal has long since fallen asleep, the ruler of the war!

Then Gaul and Ossian sat with Swaran, on the soft green banks of Lubar. I touched the harp to please the king. But gloomy was his brow. He rolled his red eyes towards Lena. The hero mourned his host. I raised mine eyes to Cromla’s brow. I saw the son of generous Semo. Sad and slow he retired, from his hill, towards the lonely cave of Tura. He saw Fingal victorious, and mixed his joy with grief. The sun is bright on his armour. Connal slowly strode behind. They sunk behind the hill, like two pillars of the fire of night: when winds pursue them over the mountain, and the flaming heath resounds! Beside a stream of roaring foam his cave is in a rock. One tree bends above it. The rushing winds echo against its sides. Here rests the chief of Erin, the son of generous Semo. His thoughts are on the battles he lost. The tear is on his cheek. He mourned the departure of his fame, that fled like the mist of Cona. O Bragela! thou art

peace. He was like the bow of the shower

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