The Annals of Coggeshall, Otherwise Sunnedon, in ... Essex ...

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Coventry, 1863 - Coggeshall (England) - 303 pages

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Page 204 - Finally brethren, farewell : be perfect, be of good comfort, be of one mind, live in peace ; and the God of love and peace shall be with you.
Page 62 - AB , hereunto moving, have given, granted and confirmed, and by these presents, do give, grant, and confirm, unto the said...
Page 126 - Dover-court, whereunto was much and great resort of people : for at that time there was a great rumour blown abroad amongst the ignorant sort, that the power of the idol of Dovercourt was so great, that no man had power to shut the church...
Page 150 - Whilst master of the college, he chanced to punish all the under-graduates therein for some general offence; and the penalty was put upon their heads in the buttery. And because that he disdained to convert the money to any private use, it was expended in new whiting the hall of the college. Whereupon a scholar hung up these verses on the screen...
Page 198 - Woman, why weepest thou ?" was our Lord's inquiry. Tears of joy become the saints, and there is no danger in them ; they will be sure to drop into his bosom, and draw out, it may be the like in him ; for he rejoices over us with singing, he rests in his love. Oh, my brethren, methinks I am with you, weeping with you, joying with you, praying with you, and hearing with you. It is true fellowship my soul has with you at a distance. I long after you much in the Lord ; yet rejoicingly stay his good pleasure....
Page 137 - ... chain cast about his middle, with a multitude of people on every side compassing him about. Unto whom, after he had spoken many things, especially unto the Lord...
Page 143 - Fox, than whom no more happy an instrument to set the joints of a broken spirit. All his counsels proved ineffectual, insomuch that, in the agony of her soul, having a Venice glass in her hand, she brake forth into this expression : ' I am as surely damned, as this glass is broken !' which she immediately threw with violence to the ground.
Page 268 - The widow Comon was put into the river to see if she would sink, because she was suspected to be a witch — and she did not sink, but swim. And she was tryed again July 19th, and then she swam again, and did not sink.
Page 268 - July 13. 1699. The widow Comon was put into the river to see if she would sink because she was suspected to be a witch and she did not sink but swim.

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