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Civil or Administrative Division of the State of Vir.

ginia, with the Population of each County and Chief Town, in 1810, the year of the late Enumeration. Counties.

Number of Inhabitants. Chief Towns. Accomack,

15,743 Drummond. Albemarle,

16,268 Charlottenville. Ainelia,

10,394 Amherst,

10,548

New Glasgow. Augusta,

14.308 Staunton. Bath,

4,837 Warmsprings. Bedford,

16,148 Liberty Berkley,

11,479 Martinsburg. Botetourt,

13,301 Fincastle, 700. Brooke,

5,813 Charlestown. Brunswick,

15,411 Buckingham,

20,059

New Canton. Campbell,

11,001 Lynchburg. Caroline,

17,544 Port-Royal, 1500. Charles' city,

5,186 Charlotte,

13,161 Marysville. Chesterfield,

9.979 Manchester. Cumberland,

9,992 Cartersville. Culpeper,

18,967 Fairfax. Cabell,

2,717 Dimviddie,

12,524 Petersburg, 5,668. Elizabeth city,

3,608 Hampton. Essex,

9,376 Tappahannock, 600. Faquier,

22,689 Warrentown. Fairfax,

13,'11 Centreville. Fluvanna,

4,775 Columbia, Frederick,

22,574 Winchester, 2,500. Franklin,

10:724 Rocky Mount. Gloucester,

10,427 Goockland,

10,203 Grayton,

4,941 Greensville.

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Jefferson,
Kenhaway,
King and Queen,
King George,
King William,
Lancaster,
Lee,
London,
Louisa,
Lunenberg,
Madison,
Matthews,
Mecklenberg,
Middlesex,
Monongalia,
Mourac,
Montgomery,
Mason,
Nansemond,
New Kent,
Norfolk county,
Northampton,
Northumberland,

Number of inhabitants. Chief Towns.

5,914 Lervisburg.
6,856 Hicksford.
3,745
22,133

South Boston.
9,784 Romney.
15,082 Hanover.

5,525 Moorfields.
9,958 Clarkenbury.
9,945 Richmond, 9,735, in

May, 1817, 14,333.
5,611 Martinsville.
9,186 Smithfield.
9,094

Williamsburg, 1,500.
11,851 Charlestown.
3,866

Charlestown.
10,988 Dunkirk.
6,454
9,285 Delaware.
5,592 Kilmarnock.
4,694 Jonesville.
21,338 Leesburg
11,900
12,265

Hungary
8,381 Madison,
4,227
18,453 St Tammany.
4,414

Urbanna.
12,793 Morgantown.

5,444 Uniontown. 8,409 Christiansburg.

1,991 Point Pleasant, 10,324 Suffolk.

6,478 Cumberland. 13,679

Norfolk. 7,474 8,308

Bridgetown.

1

Chief Towns.

Wheeling.
Stannardsville.

Franklin.
Danville.

James' Towu.
Kempsville.
Haymarket.

Beverley.

Lexington.

Counties.

Number of Inhabitants. Nottaway,

9,278 Nelson,

9,684 Ohio,

8,175 Orange,

12,323 Patrick,

4,695 Pendleton,

4,239 Pittsylvanvia,

17,172 Powhatan,

8,073 Prince Edward,

12,409 Princess Aone,

9,498 Prince William,

11,311 Prince George,

8.050 Randolph,

2,854 Richmond,

6,214 Rockbridge,

10,318 Rockingham,

12,753 Russell,

6,316 Shenpandoah,

13,646 Southampton,

13,497 Spotsylvannia,

13,296 Stafford,

9,830 Surry,

6,855 Sussex,

11,362 Tazewill,

3,007 Tyler, Warwick,

1,835 Washington,

12,136 Westmoreland,

8,102 Wood,

3,036 Wythe,

8,356 York,

5,87 City of Richmond, 9.735 Norfolk borough,

9,193 Petersburg,

5,668

Franklin. Woodstock. Jerusalem. Fredericksburg. Falmouth. Cobham.

Jeffersonville,

Abingdon.
Leeds.
Newport.
Evansham.
York.

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The increase of whites, in the last ten years, was 31,860, or 6,5 per cent.-of blacks, 55,603, or 151 per cent. The first blacks were introduced by the Hollanders, about the year 1620, and several thousands were afterwards imported, yearly, by Great Britain, to whom this trade was a source of profit. Mr Jefferson states, that, from the period when the population became uniform, in 1654, to the year 1772, it doubled every 27+ years, and that this progression continued nearly the same. The population, in 1810, was 974,672, and the area being 70,500 square miles, this gives nearly fourteen persons to a square mile.

Manners and Character.-The inhabitants of the hilly and mountainous parts are tall, robust, generally with black lively eyes, and remarkably white teeth. They are of a browner complexion than the people farther north. The country is very healthy, except in low marshy places bordering on the sea, where the inhabitants are subject to fevers and pleurisies. The yellow fever prevailed at Norfolk, in the summer and autumn of 1800 and 1801, occasioned by the miasma enianating from a considerable extent of surface, which, at the ebb of the tide, is exposed to the sun's rays. It is owing to this circumstance, that, at Lambert's point, fever and ague constantly prevail. Those who inhabit the district from Tide Water to the Blue Ridge, a breadth of from sixty to a hundred miles, enjoy a better climate, and are of larger stature than the generality of Europeans. It is not uncommon to see men from six feet six inches to six feet nine inches in height. Benjamin Harrison is seven feet five inches. Some of the natives are gifted with extraordinary muscular powers. Peter Francisco was known to take two men, each six feet high, and hold them in the air by the ankles at arms length. This tract, and the hilly country in general, is very healthy, and free from miasma; the people lead an industrious and active life, are well fed and clothed, and have comfortable houses. The Virginians are chiefly the descendants of the first English settlers, though there are some small colonies of Scotch and Irish emigrants in different parts. The population of Petersburg is chiefly from Ireland ; and, at Norfolk, there are also several families from that country, and about 300 individuals of French origin. The inhabitants of this state took an active part in the war of independence, and still interest themselves keenly in politics. They have been generally allowed to be open, frank, and hospitable, polite, generous, and high-spirited ; but they have also been accused of pride, indolence, and the other bad qualities nourished by the practice of negro slavery. A late intelligent traveller considers the plantation bred Virginians as having more pretension than good sense ; the insubordination, he says, both to parental and scholastic authority, in which they glory, produces, as might be expected, a petulance of manner, and frothiness of intellect, very unlike what we may inagine of the old Romans, to whom they affect to com

It is but justice, however, to the Virginians, to admit, that their treatment of the ne

pare themselves. *

* Hall's Travels, p. 392. London, 1818.

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