The American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year ...: Comprising a Calendar for the Year; Astronomical Information; Miscellaneous Directions, Hints, and Remarks; and Statistical and Other Particulars Respecting Foreign Countries and

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Gray and Bowen, 1838 - Almanacs, American

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Page 162 - The legislature shall, as soon as conveniently may be, provide, by law, for the establishment of schools throughout the State, in such manner that the poor may be taught gratis.
Page 75 - Tis indeed a part of life that best expresseth death; for every man truly lives, so long as he acts his nature, or some way makes good the faculties of himself.
Page 144 - Barnstable, Berkshire, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex...
Page 79 - States, for the term of six years, one third being elected biennially. The Vice-Président of the United States is the President of the Senate, in which body he has only a casting vote, which is given in case of an equal division of the votes of the Senators.
Page 102 - POSTAGE. On a Single Letter composed of One Piece of Paper, For any distance, not exceeding 30 miles, 6 cents. Over 30, and not exceeding 80 " 10 " Over 80, and not exceeding 150...
Page 168 - The judges are required to arrange themselves into four classes, of five judges each, one of whom is exempt, in rotation, from attending the court. The General Court has appellate jurisdiction in the last resort in criminal cases ; also original jurisdiction of probates and administrations, and some claims of the Commonwealth. Its judges, or a portion of them, sit as a Special Court of Appeals, in cases in which the judges of the Court of Appeals, proper, are disqualified by interest, or otherwise....
Page 75 - He who must needs have company, must needs have sometimes bad company. Be able to be alone ; lose not the advantage of solitude and the society of thyself; nor be only content but delight to be alone and single with OmniPresency.
Page 7 - ... otherwise much greater. But when a tide, which arrives when the Sun and Moon are in a favorable position for producing a great elevation, is still further increased by a very strong wind, the rise of the water will be uncommonly great, sufficient, perhaps, to cause damage.
Page 8 - TIDE TABLE. The following Table contains the difference between the time of high water at Boston, and at a large number of places on the American coast, by which the time at any of them may be easily ascertained, by subtracting; the difference at the place in question from the time at Boston, when the sign — is prefixed to it ; and by adding it, when the sign is...
Page 73 - ... that men in health are NEVER benefited by the use of ardent spirits, — that, on the contrary, the use of them is a frequent cause of disease and dqath, and often renders such diseases as arise from other causes more difficult of cure, and more fatal in their termination.

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