The Economy of the Animal Kingdom: Considered Anatomically, Physically, and Philosophically

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Page 1 - The blood is as it were the complex of all things that exist in the world, and the storehouse and seminary of all that exist in the body.
Page 8 - There are others again who enjoy a natural faculty for contemplating facts already discovered, and eliciting their causes. Both are peculiar gifts and are seldom united in the same person. Besides I found when intently occupied in exploring the secrets of the human body, that as soon as I discovered anything that had not been observed before, I began (seduced probably by self-love) to grow blind to the most acute lucubrations and researches of others and to originate a whole...
Page 12 - Pompilius sanguis, carmen reprehendite quod non Multa dies et multa litura coercuit, atque Perfectum decies non castigavit ad unguem.
Page 9 - When, after a long course of reasoning, they make a discovery of the truth, straightway there is a cheering light and joyful confirmatory brightness that plays around the sphere of their mind, and a kind of mysterious radiation — I know not whence it proceeds — that darts through some sacred temple in the brain. Thus a sort of rational instinct displays itself, and in a manner gives notice that...
Page 8 - ... accurately as the subject required, the idea of universals in individuals, and of individuals under universals. Nay, when I essayed to form principles from these discoveries, I thought I could detect in various other phenomena much to confirm their truth, although in reality they were fairly susceptible of no construction of the kind. I therefore laid aside my instruments and restraining my desire for making observations, determined rather to rely on the researches of others than to trust to...
Page 2 - ... things were created for the purpose of administering to the composition and continued renewal of the blood. For if all things exist for the sake of man, and with a view to afford him the conditions and means of living, then all things exist for the sake of the blood, which is the parent and nourisher of every part of the body; for nothing exists in the body that has not previously existed in the blood.

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