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Happier as kinder, in whate'er degree,
And height of Bliss but height of Charity. 360

God loves from Whole to Parts : But human sou
Must rise from Individual to the Whole,
Self-love but serves the virtuous mind to wake,
As the small pebble stirs the peaceful lake;
The centre mov'd, a circle Atrait succeeds, 365
Another still, and still another fpreads;
Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace ;
His country next ; and next all human race ;
Wide and more wide, th'o'erflowings of the mind
Take ev'ry creature in, of ev'ry kind; 370
Earth smiles around, with boundless bounty blest,
And Heav'n beholds its image in his breast.

Come then, my Friend ! my Genius ! come along! Oh master of the poet, and the song!

VARIATIONS. VER, 373.. Come then, my friend, &c.] In the MS. thus,

And now transported o'er so vast a Plain,
While the wing'd courser flies with all her rein,
While heav'n-ward now her mounting wing The feels,
Now fcat.er'd fools fly trembling from her heels,
Wilt thou, my St. John ! keep her course in sight,
Confine her fury, and aflift her fight?

NOT es. VER. 373. Come iben, my friend! &c.) This noble Apostrophe, by which the Poet concludes the Efray in an ad.

my

And while the Muse now stoops, or now ascends, 375 To man's low paffions, or their glorious ends.

NOTES: dress to his friend, will furnish a Critic with example of every one of those five Species of Elocution, from which, as from its Sources, Longinus deduceth the SUBLIME*.

1. The first and chief is a Grandeur and Sublimity of Conception. Come then, Friend!

my

Genius ! come along,
O Master of the Poet, and the Sang!
And while the Muse now stoops, or now ascends,

To man's low paflions, or their glorious ends. 2. The second, that pathetic Enthufiafm, which, at the fame time, melts and inflames :

Teach me, like thee, in various nature wise,
To fall with dignity, with temper rise,
Form'd by thy converse, happily to steer
From grave to gay, from lively to fevere;
Correct with spirit, eloquent with ease,

Intent to reason, or polite to please. 3. A certain elegant Formation and Ordonance of Figures :

Oh! while along the stream of Time thy name
Expanded fies, and gathers all its fame,

my

little bark attendant fail, Pursue the triumph, and partake the gale! 4. A splendid di&ion:

When statesmen, heroes, kings, in duft repose,

Whose sons shall blush their fathers were thy foes, a --- σίντι πηγαί τινές εισι της υψηγορίας. 1. Πρώτον και κράτισον το αρι τας νοήσεις αδρεπήβολον. 2. Δεύτερον δε το σφοδρών και ένθυσιαστικών παθώ». 3. Ποιοι των χημάτων πλασις. 4. Η γυναία φράσις, 5. Πέμπτη και μεγέθες αιτία, και συκλείεσα τα προ εαυτής άπανα, ή αν αξιώματα και άρσή σύνθεσης,

Say, shall

Teach me, like thee, in various nature wife,
To fall with dignity, with temper rise

; Form’d by thy converse, happily to steer From grave to gay, from lively to severe ;

380 Correct with spirit, eloquent with ease, Intent to reason, or polite to please. Oh! while along the stream of Tiine thy name Expanded flies, and gathers all its fame; Say, shall my little bark attendant fail, 385 Pursue the triumph, and partake the gale ? When statesmen, heroes, kings, in duft repose, Whose fons shall blush their fathers were thy foes, Shall then this verse to future age pretend Thou wert my guide, philosopher, and friend ? 390 That urg'd by thee, I turn'd the tuneful art From sounds to things,' from fancy to the heaït ;

NOTES.

Shall then this verse to future age pretend
Thou wert my guide, philosopher, and friend?
That, urg'a by thee, I turn d the tuneful art
From sounds to things, from fancy to the heart ,

For wit's false mirror held up Nature's light ; 5. And, fifthly, which includes in itself all the rest, a Weight and Dignity in the composition :

Shew'd erring pride whatever is, is Right; -
That Reason, Passion, answer one great AIM;
That true SELF-LOVE and SOCIAL are the Same,
That Virtue only makes our Bliss below ;
And all our Knowledge is, OURSELVES TO KNOW.

For Wit's false mirror held up Nature's light;
Shew'd erring Pride, WHATEVER IS, IS RIGHT ;
That REASON, Passion, answer one greataim ; 395
That true SELF-LOVE and SOCIAL are the same ;
That VIRTUE only makes our Bliss below;
And all our knowledge is OURSELVES TO KNOW.

VARIATIONS.

VER. 397. That virtue only, &c.] In the MS, thus,

That just to find a God is all we can,
And all the Study of Mankind is Man.

NOT E s.

Ver. 394. Shew'd erring Pride, Whatever is, is Right ;] The poet's address to his friend, which concludeth this epistle so nobly, and endeth with a recapitulation of the general argument, affords me the following observation, with which I shall conclude these remarks. There is one great beauty that shines through the whole Ejay: The Poet, whether he speaks of Man as an Individual, a Member of Society, or the Subject of Happiness, never misseth an opportunity, while he is explaining his state under any of these capacities, to illustrate it in the most artful manner by the inforcement of his grand Principle : THAT

TO THE GOOD OF THE WHOLE ; from whence his fyftem receives the reciprocal advantage of having that grand Theorem realized by facts, and his facts justified on a principle of Right or Nature.

EVERY

THING

TENDETH

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