Experimental Investigation of the Physiological Action of Saline Cathartics

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MacLachlan, 1884 - Laxatives - 201 pages
 

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Page 199 - Purgation will not ensue if water be withheld from the diet for one or two days previous to the administration of the salt in a concentrated form. 7. The absence of purgation is not due to the want of water in the alimentary canal, but to its deficiency in the blood. 8. Under ordinary conditions, with an unrestricted supply of water, the maximal amount of fluid accumulated within the canal corresponds very nearly to the quantity of water required to form a five or six per cent, solution of the amount...
Page 199 - The excito-sccretory action of the salt is probably due to the bitterness as well as to the irritant and specific properties of the salt, and not to osmosis. 3. The low diffusibility of the salt impedes the absorption of the secreted fluid. 4. Between stimulated secretion on the one hand, and impeded absorption on the other, there is an accumulation of fluid in the canal. 5. The accumulated fluid, partly from ordinary dynamical laws, partly from a gentle stimulation of the peristaltic movements excited...
Page 201 - According as the salt-solution within the intestine increases in amount, there occurs a corresponding diminution of the fluids of the blood. 33. The blood recoups itself in a short time by absorbing from the tissues a nearly equal quantity of their fluids. 34. The salt, after some hours, causes diuresis, and with it a second concentration of the blood, which continues so long as the diuresis is active. 35. As the intestinal secretion excited by the salt contains a very small proportion of organic...
Page 199 - Cceteris paribus, the weaker, or in other words, the more voluminous the solution of the salt administered is, the more quickly is the maximum within the canal reached ; and accordingly purgation follows with greater rapidity.
Page 199 - ... per cent, solution of the amount of salt administered. 9. If, therefore, a solution of this strength be given, it does not increase in bulk. 10. If a solution of greater strength be administered, it rapidly increases in volume until the maximum is attained. This it accomplishes in the case of a twenty per cent, solution in from one to one and a half hours.
Page 200 - ... administered per os, as the strong solution becomes diluted in the stomach and duodenum before passing into the intestine generally, 22. The difference is due to the local action of the salt on the mucous membrane, and probably more to an impeded absorption than to a stimulated secretion. 23. When the salt is administered in the usual manner, it appears, in the case of...
Page 200 - After the maximum of excretion of the acid has been reached, the salt begins very slowly and gradually to disappear by absorption, which is checked only by the occurrence of purgation. (26) During the alternations of absorption and secretion of the acid, it is the salt left within the intestine which excites secretion, the absorbed and excreted acid exerting no such action whilst in the blood, or during the process of its excretion, as Headland believed. (27) The salt does not purge when injected...
Page 201 - Nor does it purge, when injected subcntancously, unless in virtue of its causing local irritation of the abdominal subcutaneous tissue, which acts reflexly on the intestines, dilating their blood-vessels, and perhaps stimulating their muscular movements. 29. The sulphate of soda exhibits no poisonous action when injected into the circulation. 30. The sulphate of magnesia is, on the other hand, powerfully toxic when so injected, paralyzing first the respiration and afterwards the heart, and abolishing...
Page 199 - Unless the solution 01 the salt is more concentrated than ten per cent, it excites little or no secretion in the stomach. (14) The salt is absorbed with extreme slowness by the stomach of the cat. (15) The salt excites an active secretion in the intestines, and probably for the most part in the small intestine, all portions of this viscus being capable of yielding the secretion in almost equal quantities. (16) The bile and pancreatic juice participate but very little in the secretion. (17) The secretion...
Page 199 - The salt is absorbed with extreme slowness by the stomach of the cat. . 15. The salt excites an active secretion in the intestines, and probably for the most part in the small intestine, all portions of this viscus being capable of yielding the secretion in almost equal quantities. 16. The bile and pancreatic juice participate but very little in the secretion. 17. The secretion is probably a true succiis entericus, resembling the secretion obtained by Moreau after division of the mesenteric nerves.

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