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THE MEMBERS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM.

Characteristics of th.e Sun and its eight satellites, dimensions. , _^ ~ periodicity, etc.

density,

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EMBER DAYS.

Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after—
■First Sunday in Lent—March 7, 9, 10.
Pentecost—June 6, 8, 9.
September 14—September 19. 21. 22.
December 13—December 19, 21-and 22.

Between Mars and Jupiter there are about 450 asteroids, or little planets, combined mass is estimated to be about one-tenth of that of the Earth. CHRONOLOGICAL ERAS.

Th<-> year 1906, which comprises the latter part of the 130th and the beginning of the 131st year of the independence of the United States of America, corresponds nearly to—

The Mahometan year 1324. -which begins on February 25.

The Jewish year 5667 of the Jewish Era, which begins at sunset -September 19.

The Chinese year 4603, which begins January 25.

The year 7414-15 of the Byzantine Era, beginning September 1.

The year 2218- of the Grecian Era. which l?°?an near the Vernal Equinox B. C. 312.

The year 2566 of the Japanese Era.

CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES.

Dominical Letter G

Eipact 5'

Lunar. Cycle (Golden Number) 7

Solar Cycle ". 11

Roman Ihdiction 4

Julian Period 6619

Jewish Lunar Cycle: 4

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The place indicated is that constellation in which the planet Is situated on the first, second, third, fourth and fifth Sundays of each month in the order named.

CHURCH DAYS AND MOVABLE
FEASTS.

Septuagesima Sunday Feb. 11

Sexagesima Sunday ..Feb. 18

Quinquagesima Sunday Feb. 25

Shrove Tuesday Feb. 27

Ash Wednesday, <,Lent begins).... Feb. 28

Quadragesima Sunday March 4

Mid-Lent Sunday March 25

Passion Sunday April 1

Palm Sunday; April 8

Good Friday April 13

Easter Sunday April 15

Low Sunday April 22

Rogation Sunday May 20

Ascension Thursday May 24

Pentecost (Whit Sunday) June 3

Trinity Sunday - .June 10

Corpus Christi • .June 14

Advent Sunday Dec. 2

MAHOMETAN CALENDAR.

The year 1324 is the fourth of the 45th cycle of 30 j^ears, and contains 354 days— a common lunar year. Lasts,

Year. , Month. ^ Begins, days.

1323.. . 11. .. Dul Kaeda (1905).Dec. 28 30

.12...Dulhegge (1906)..Jan. 27

. 1... Muharrem ...... Feb. 25

.Saphar March 27

.Rabia I. April 25

.Rabia II. ... May 25

.Jomhadi I June 25

. Jomhadi II July 25

.Rajcb Aug. 23

.Shaban .... Sept. 22

.Ramadan* Oct.

Feast of Bairam.

. Sehawall Nov

.Dul Kaeda Dec.

.Dulhegge (1907)..Jan 18
.Muharrem (1907).Feb. 14

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20
19

ECLIPSES.

There -will bo five eclipses this year, three of the Sun and two of the Moon, as follows:

I Total of the Moon .Feb. 8-0, visible generally on the evening of the 8th and morning of the Oth throughout the United States. The follow lug is the standard time -of the different phases:

Intercolonial Eastern Central Mountain Pacific Standard Standard, standard Standard Standard

Time. . Time. Time. Time. Time.

H.ML II.M. H.M. H.M. H.M.

Moon enters Penumbra or Light

Shadow <a> 0:54 AM U:54 PM 10:54 PM 9

Moon enters. Umbra or Dark Shadow

First 6 Digits Eclipsed

Total Ellipse begins

Middle or Greatest Eclipse,

Total Eclipse ends

Last <3 Digits Eclipsed

Partial Eclipse ends.

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South Path of ibo Moon through the earth':

shadow, Fe

During the time the Moon is Immersed in the penumbra or light shadow at b and f the diminution of light will be slight but noticeable. The real partial phase of the eclipse does not' begin until the Moon, in her eastward course, indicated'by the arrow, touches the earth's umbra or dark shadow at b and lasts until wholly immersed at c. Even when entirely within the dark shadow her outline may be distinctly followed, her disc presenting a dull coppery hue. The shadow which the earth easts into space is about 860,000 miles in length and its diameter at the distance where the Mloon ' will pass through it is about 6*500 miles. The total distance through both shadows traversed by the Moon in this eclipse being about 10,000 miies in 5 hours 46 minutes. The size of this eclipse is 19.57 digit.* the Moon's diameter being: taken «is 12 digits. This is measured on a line at right angles to the arrow from d, the middle point, and- downward,- or south, in this case because the Moon passes below the centre of the shadow. The circles at 1 and 2 show how the Moon will appear wlwn the first and last six digits "are eclipsed. The total phase will begin at c and end at e. Hold the cut so the north point will be toward the North Star and lock upward at the figure to have it natural.

II. Partial of the Sun Feb. 23. invisible in America.

III. Partial of the Sun July 21, invisible in America.

IV. Total of the Moon Aug. 4. The begilining only of this eclipse will be visible In the United States and that in the central and western parts.

Central

Standard

Time.

H.M.

Moon enters Penumbra or Light Sliadow 4:12 A.M,

Moon enters Umbra or Dark Shadow , 5:11 *'

Fist six, Digits Eclipsed «... 5:40"

Total Eclipse begins 6: 0"

V. Partial of the Sun Aug. 10. Visible as a very small cclipcc near nunset in the extreme northwestern portion of the United States, viz: West of a line from Lake of the Woods through Grand Forks, N. D., and southwesterly along the Cheyenne'River through the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains to Payson, Utah, south of Salt Lake" City and north of a line from Payson northwesterly to the mouth of the Umpqua Rtver, Oregon. Throughout most of Montana. North. Dakota and Wyoming the Sun will set more or less eclipsed.

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Phaet

Saiph

Beteigeuse
Menkalina
Canopus .
Al llcaa..
HiriusCDogSt'r)

Adara

Casior

Procyon (Var.)

Pollux

Bita.

Alphard ...
Regulus ...

Eta

Bubhc .• . . £)enebola ,.

Acrux

Beta

Spies

Agena ....
Arcturus ..
Bengula ..

Alpha

Kochab ...
Alphacea ..
Unuk .....
An tares ...
Rutilicus •■
EtamLn ...

Vega

Delta

AltaJr

Alpha

Deneb

Alderamln

Beta i

Enif ......

Sepha .....

Foaialhaut
Markab ...
Iota

Celus (Whale)

Perseus

Perseus

Taurus (Pleiades, or 7 stars)

Taurus (Bull) <8)

Auriga

Orion

Tauiua -

Orion (Ell and Yard)

Orion (Middle of Yard, or

Belt)

Colomba

Orion

Orion (Var.).*

Auriga

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2.1

2.4

2.8

3.0

2.3

2.2

2.3

2.2

2.2

0.4

2.8

2.2

2.1

2-10

2.0

2-4

1.9

3.1

1.0

0.1 }

0.3

1.8

2.3

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21 12
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Explanation.—To ascertain when any star or constellation will be on tht imeriafan add the lumbers opposite In tha _c^mn_^orjnendian pas^ge

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figures 111 the table "Sidereal noon" following this note. Note whether the fi«rurea be "Morn" or "Eve," If "Mora" and the mim is mott than 12 boars, the result will be evening of the name day; if "Eve," and the sum ia more than 12 hours, the result will be morning of^the next day. Having found the time of meridian passage, for the rising subtract and for the setting add the numbers opposite the name of the Ktar in the column headed "For rising and setting," observing the directions as to 'Mora

and "Eve," as given above. Those stars marked in the last column are eircum

polar and do not rise or set In the latitude of New-York City. Stars having an asterisk (*) in the last column are only to be seen in the far south and when near the meridian, as the vapors of the horizon will obscure them at rising or wtting

To tell how high up from the nearest point of the horizon a star will be at Its meridian passage, subtract the declination of the star from 90*, and if the result Is less than the latitude of the place of the observer that star will neither rise nor set, but is circumpolar, and the difference between that result and the latitude shows the star's altitude above the north point of the horison or below the soutnern horizon. Or, (90° — dec.) —latitude = altitude or elevation of the star above the nearest pwat of the horizon at meridian passage for stars of a soeth decMnatioii* Ssaaoples:

Sidereal noon, November 5 ;.. 9 03 p.m.

Pomalhaut in "meridian" column.,., 22 48

8101
24 0

7 51 p. m. of the 0th=Tlme of meridian passage.
. 7 51 p. m.
4 0

Subtract *««.« ^.-...-e ►»-*»..

7 51 p. m.

4 0 In "Rising and setting" column.

3 51 p. m. ==> Time of rising. II 51 p. m = Time of setting.

Declination of Fomalhaut = 30° south; therefore 90e — 30* = 00* — 40* = 20° == altitude of Pomalhaut in latitude 40° north at the time of the meridian passage of that star. To measure celestial distances with the eye, keep in mind that one-third of the distance from the zenith to the horizon is 30°. For smaller measurements use the "Pointers" in the "Big Dipper," which are nearly 5" apart—a convenient celestial unit because always in sight. The "Yardstick*' or "Ell and Yard" in Orion, or the "Kings," is just 3° long, or lyeach way from the central star (see Star table). Wh^n the declination of a star is such as to bring it nearer to the zenith than to the horizon at meridian passage, use its zenith distance to locate it. The difference between latitude and declination = zenith distance. If declination is greater than latitude, such difference is to be counted northward (otherwise southward) from zenith.

SIDEREAL NOON.

To be use,d in connection with the foregoing Star Table, same. Full-faced, black figures are p.Cjtn.; all others a. m.

See not« following

1.

2.

8.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 16. 16. 17. 18. IS. 20, 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 86. 27. 28. 29. 89. 81.

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MOON'S PLACE IN THIS ZODIAC AT 7 P.

Day,

: I. 2. 3. 4,, 5., 6.. 7. 8., 9.

10.

11..

12.

13.

14.

15,

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.

2.1.

24.

25,

26.

27.

28.

29.

30.

31,

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SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC.

The signs of the Zodiac and parte of the human body supposed to be affected by tho same: Pisces X. feet, Aries cp. head: Taurus 8. neck; Gemini n. arms; Cancer 23, breast; I*eo £1, heart; Virgo 1T5. bowels; Libra ^z. kidneys; Scorpio m, loins; Sagittarius .?. thighs; Capicornus ]fr. knees; Aquarius Si. legs.

MERIDIAN PASSAGE OR SOUTHTNO OF THE MOON.

(Washington Mean Time. > For places west of Washington add two minutes for each hour of longitude. Full-faced, black type indicates p. m.

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