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impression made on them by the force of this objection. Had Bergami obtained the dignity which he then held by worthy means, had his merits or fidelity entitled him to so many marks of distinction, would not her Majesty have expressed the utmost resentment at Capt. Pechell's objection: would she not have said, that he with whom she did not consider that she demeaned herself by associating, was fit society for any British officer, be he who he might; that an insult bad been offered to her, and to the nation which had provided her with ships of war in order to visit foreign countries ; that she would complaiu to superior authority, and not go on board till she should have received reparation ? But was this the conduct of her Majesty on that occasion ? : If Bergami's advancement were a proof of his merits, and his merits alone, would not this, or something like this, have been her Majesty's reply? But the inward consciousness that the advancement of that person originated in a licentious passion, and was founded on a gross and scandalous intercourse, prevented the adoption of a step which would otherwise bave been perfectly natural. She took a day or two to deliberate whether she should give up the society of her paramour for that of Capt. Pechell, and stated to the latter, that Capt. Briggs, of the Leviathan, had not objected to the admission of Bergami to his table. - The answer was, that there was this material difference between the situation of Captain Briggs and Captain Pechell,

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that the former had never known Bergami in his menial situation, but that he had actually waited bebind Captain Pechell's chair. This delay of a day or two furnished a convincing proof of the influence acquired over her by this unhappy infa. tuation. She submitted to be insulted by an English captain, (for an insult it was, unless the circumstances justified his remonstrance, and he was sure their lordships would see that he had only done what he felt to be his duty.) Rather than sacrifice the society of Bergami she went on board, declined Captain Pechell's table, and ordered a separate one, at which she continued for several days to dine, and suffer the degradation of associating with a person whom the captain refused to admit. She landed at Syracuse, where a similar arrangement as to the selection of rooms was again made, and, after a stay of three days, she proceeded to Catania. Here Bergami's bed-room was at first at a distance from her's, but a change soon took place, and means were adopted to secure a regular access. Again it was observed that they retired at an earlier hour than other persons,

and on one occasion the filles-dechambre having sat up later than usual, observed the door of Bergami's room open, and the Princess coming out of it under circumstances which satisfied them that she had passed the night there. She was undressed, and had under her arm the pillow on which it was her uniform custom to sleep. This fact alone, if proved in evidence, would be sufficient to satisfy any jury, that a criminal intercourse had take place; but when,

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added to all the other circumstances, must remove all doubt on that subject from the mind ef every man. It would appear too, that her Majesty had conceived an extraordinary fondness for an infant child of Bergami's, between two and three years old, which slept in the same room and often in the same bed with her. She treated it with every mark of parental affection, sometimes calling it • princess ;' and the child, on the other hand, would

cry,

and was with difficulty pacified when she happened to quit the room.. The child' called 'mama;' and these circumstances altogether persuaded the servants at Catania that it was not the first occasion on which an adulterous intercourse had been carried on. Having conferred so many honours on Bergami, she now procured for him the dignity of a Knight of Malta, and always addressed bim as Chevalier. What necessity was there for this, or what reason but that guilty attachment which had been so often indicated could be assigned for it? Whilst at Catania, the nobility tendered to her their respects, and she enjoyed at first the society of the first persons there ; but after a short residence she became indifferent to all society but that of her paramour, and they gradually withdrew. From this place she proceeded to Augusta.

It being now 4 o'clock, the LORD CHANCELLOR moved an adjournment. Several peers were desirous of proceeding, but it was finally agreed to adjourn; the Attorney-General having observed to their lordships with considerable emphasis, that he had not yet gone through one half of his disgusting narrative.

Non-contents, against calling in Counsel to

proceed with the Bill.

Dukes of Gloucester

Somerset
Grafton
St. Alban's
Bedford
Devonshire
Portland
Hamilton
Argyll

Leinster
Marquis Lansdown

Downshire

Earl of Derby

Suffolk,

Denbeigh

Thanet

Essex

Albermarle

Jersey

Oxford

Cowper

Stanhope

Fitzwilliam

Hardwicke

Darlington

Ilchester

Waldegrave

Grosvenor

Fortescue,

Carnarvon

Rosslyn

Romney

Grey

Earls of Minto

Breadalbane
Rosebery
Besborough
Darnley

Blesinton
Viscounts Bolingbroke

Torrington
Hood
Anson
Duncan
Clifden

Downe

Lords Dacre

Saye and Sele,

King

Sondes

Holland

Ducie

Hawke

Foley

Sherborne

Kenyon

Auckland

Dundas

Yarborough

Calthorpe

Gwydir

Alvanley

Erskine

Prudhoe

Belhaven.

In the second division on Earl Grey's amend-
ment, the Earl of Guildford voted for it; Lord Calthorpe voted against it.

Thus concluded, what may be termed, the First Day's Trial of Her Majesty, Queen CA

ROLINE.

SECOND DAY.

On Monday, August 21st. the important Trial proceeded. The members of the House of Lords as if filled with anxiety respecting the remaining half of the disgusting narrative, which the Attorney-General bad to detail, began to assemble at the early hour of nine o'clock. The House was almost filled by half-past nine, and the Lord Chancellor took his seat, and prayers were read.

Her Majesty as will hereafter appear, spared herself the pain of listening to this offensive narrative, by not entering the house till it was finished.

BILL OF PAINS AND PENALTIES.

The house was called over at 10 o'clock : among the defaulters were Lord Alvanley and the Earl of Blesinton.

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