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We yet entertain hopes of your uniting with us in the defence of our common liberty, and there is yet reason to believe, that should we join in imploring the attention of our sovereign, to the unmerited and unparalleled oppressions of his American subjects, he will at length be undeceived, and forbid a licentious ministry any longer to riot in the ruins of the rights of mankind.

Ordered, That the above Tetter be signed by the president.

Ordered, That Mr. Dickinson, and Mr. Mifflin, be a committee to get the letter translated into the French language, and to have one thousand copies of it, so translated, printed, in order to be sent to Canada, and dispersed among the inhabitants there.

Upon motion, Resolved, That no provisions or necessaries of any kind be ex

Sirted to the island of Nantucket, except from the colony of Massachusettsay, the convention of which colony is desired to take measures for effectually providing the said island, upon their application to purchase the same, with as much provision, as shall be necessary tor its internal use, and no more.

The Congress deeming it of great importance to North-America, that the British fishery should not be furnished with provisions from the continent through Nantucket, earnestly recommend a vigilant execution of this resolve to all committees.

Ordered, That the above resolve be immediately published.

As the present critical situation of the colonies renders it highly necessary that ways and means should be devised for the speedy and secure conveyance of intelligence from one end of the continent to the other,

Resolved, That Mr. Franklin, Mr. Lynch, Mr. Lee, Mr. Willing, Mr. S. Adams, and Mr. P. Livingston, be. a committee to consider the best means of establishing post for conveying letters and intelligence through this continent.

Resolved, That the order of the day be postponed till to-morrow.

Adjourned till to-morrow, at nine o'clock.

TUESDAY, May 30,1775.

The Congress met according to adjournment.

A member informed the Congress, that a gentleman, just arrived from London, had brought with him a paper, which he says he received from Lord North, and which was written, at the desire of his lordship, by Mr. Grey Cooper, under-secretary to the treasury, and as the gentleman understood it to be his lordship's desire that it should be communicated to the Congress, for that purpose he had put it into his hands. The member farther observed, that he had shewn the paper to a member near him, who was well acquainted with the hand writing of Mr. Cooper, and that he verily believes the paper was written by Mr. Cooper.

The paper being read, is as follows:

"That it is earnestly hoped by all the real friends of the Americans, that the terms expressed in the resolution of the 20th of February last, will be accepted by all the colonies, who have the least affection for their king and country, or a just sense of their own interest.

"That these terms are honorable for Great-Britain, and safe for the colonies.

"That if the colonies are not blinded by faction, these terms will remove every grievance relative to taxation, and be the basis of a compact between the colonies, and the mother country.

". That the people in America ought, on every consideration, to be satisfied with them.

"That no further relaxation can be admitted.

"The temper and spirit of the nation are so much against concessions, that if it were the intention of administration, they could not carry the question.

"But administration have no such intention, as they are fully and firmly persuaded, that further concessions would be injurious to the colonies as well as to Great-Britain.

"That there is not the least probability of a change of administration.

"That they are perfectly united in opinion, and determined to pursue the most effectual measures, and to use the whole force of the kingdom, if it be found necessary, to reduce the rebellious and refractory provinces and colonies.

'• There is so great a spirit in the nation against the Congress, that the people will bear the temporary distresses of a stoppage of the American trade.

"They may depend on this to be true."

Ordered, To lie on the table.

Agreeable to the order of the day, the Congress resolved itself into a committee of the whole, to take into consideration the state of America, and continued so to do the day following, when after some time, the president resumed the chair, and Mr. Ward reported from the committee, that they had proceeded in the business, but not having come to a conclusion, desired him to more for leave to sit again.

Resolved, That this Congress will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a committee of the whole, to take into their farther consideration the state of America.

A letter from Col. Arnold, dated Crown-Point, May 23, 1775, was laid before the Congress, informing that he had certain intelligence, that " on the 19th there were then four hundred regulars at St John's, making all possible preparation to cross the lake, and expected to be joined by a number of Indians, with a design of re-taking Crown-point and Ticonderoga," and earnestly calling for a reinforcement and supplies. This letter being taken into consideration,

Resolved, That the governor of Connecticut be requested immediately to send a strong reinforcement to the garrisons of Crown-Point and Ticonderoga* and that so many of the cannon and other stores be retained, as may be necessary for the immediate defence of those posts, until further order from this Congress, and that the provincial convention of New-York be informed of this resolve, and desired to furnish those troops with provisions and other necessary stores, and to take effectual care that a sufficient number of batteaus be immediately provided for the lakes.

Ordered, That the above resolve be immediately transmitted in a letter by the president, to governor Trumbull, and the convention at New-York.

Orderrd, That the president in his letter acquaint governor Trumbull, that it is the desire of Congress, that he should appoint a person, in whom he can confide, to command the forces at Crown-Point and Ticonderoga.

Adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock.

THURSDAY, June 1, 1775.

The Congress met according to adjournment.

The committee appointed to consider ways and means to supply these colonies with ammunition and military stores, brought in their report, which was read, and referred to the committee of the whole.

Upon motion, Resolved, That it be recommended to the government of Connecticut, or the general of the forces of that colony, to appoint commissaries to receive at Albany and forward the supplies of provisions, fur the forces on lake Champlain, from the provincial convention of New-York, and that the said convention use their utmost endeavors in facilitating and aiding the transportation thereof, from thence to where the said commissaries may direct.

As this Congress has nothing more in view than the defence of these colonies,

Resolved, That no expedition or incursion ought to be undertaken or made, by any colony, or body of colonists, against or into Canada; and that this resolve be immediately transmitted to the commander of the forces at Ticonderoga.

Ordered, That the above resolve be translated into the French language, and transmitted, with the letter, to the inhabitants of Canada.

Ordered, That the president transmit a copy of the above to New-York, and the other colonies bordering on Canada.

A petition from the committee representing the people in that part of Augusta county, in the colony of Virginia, on the west' side of the Allegheny mountain, was laid before the Congress and read, intimating '' fears of a rupture with the Indians on account of lord Dunmore's conduct," and desiring "commissioners from the colony of Virginia, and province of Pennsylvania, to attend a meeting of the Indians at Pittsburgh, on behalf of these colonies."

Ordered, That the above be referred to the delegates of the colonies of Virginia and Pennsylvania.

The Congress then, agreeable to the order of the day, resolved itself into a committee of the whole, to take into consideration the state of America, and after some time spent therein, the president resumed the chair, and Mr. Ward reported from the committee, that they had taken the matters referred to them, into consideration, but not having yet come to a conclusion, desired him to move for leave to sit again.

llesolved, That this Congress will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a committee of the whole, to take into their farther consideration the state of America.

Adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock.

FRIDAY, June 2, 1775.

The Congress met according to adjournment.

The president laid before the Congress a letter from the provincial convention of Massachusetts-Bay, dated May 16, which was read, setting forth the difficulties they labour under for want of a regular form of government, and as they and the other colonies are now compelled to raise an army to defend themselves from the butcheries and devastations of their implacable enemies, which renders it still more necessary to have a regular established government, requesting the Congress to favour them with "explicit advice respecting the taking up and exercising the powers of civil government," and declaring their readiness to "submit to such a general plan as the Congress may direct for the colonies, or make it their great study to establish such a form of government there, as shall not only promote their advantage, but the union and interest of all America."

Ordered, To lie on the table for farther consideration.

Doctor Benjamin Church being directed by the convention of Massachusetts Bay, to confer with the Congress respecting such matters, as may be necessary to the defence of that colony, and particularly the state of the army therein;

Ordered, That he be introduced.

After he withdrew, an express arriving with despaches from MassachusettsBay, the President laid before the Congress letters from the conventions of that colony, and New-Hampshire, also from governor Trumbull, which were read.

Upon motion, Resolved, that no bill of exchange, draught, or order of any officer in the army or navy, their agents or contractors, be received, or negotiated, or any money supplied to them by any person in America;

That no provisions or necessaries of any kind be furnished or supplied to, or for the use of, the British army or navy, in the colony of Massachusetts-Bay;

That no vessel employed in transporting British troops to America, or from one part of North America to another, or warlike stores or provisions for said troops, be freighted or furnished with provisions or any necessaries, until further orders from this Congress.

Ordered, That the above resolves be immediately published. The order of the day being postponed, the Congress adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock.

SATURDAY, June 3, 1775.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from the convention of New-York, together with sundry letters and papers enclosed, from Albany, were laid before the Congress and read.

Ordered, To lie on the table.

The letter from the convention of Massachusetts, dated the 16th May, being again read,

Resolved, That a committee of five persons be chosen to consider the same,' and report what in their opinion is the proper advice to be given to that convention.

The following persons were chosen by ballot, to compose that committee, viz. Mr. J. RutTedge, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Jay, Mr. Wilson, and Mr. Lee.

Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to draught a petition to the king.

That another committee of three be appointed to prepare an address to the inhabitants of Great-Britain.

That another committee of* four be appointed to prepare an address to the people of Ireland.

That another committee of three be appointed to bring in the draught of a letter to the inhabitants of Jamaica.

That another committee of five be appointed to bring in an estimate of the money necessary to be raised.

The Congress then proceeded to chuse, by ballot, the several committees, when Mr. Dickinson, Mr. Johnson, Mr. J. Rutledge, Mr. Jay, and Mr. Franklin, were elected to compose the first; Mr. Lee, Mr. R. R. Livingston, and Mr. Pendleton, for the second; Mr. Duane, Mr. W. Livingston, Mr. S. Adams, and Mr. J. Adams, for the third; Mr. Hooper, Mr. Wilson, and Mr. Lynch, for the fourth; and Mr. Washington, Mr. Schuyler, Mr. Deane, Mr. Cushing, and Mr. Hewes, for the fifth.

Adjourned till Monday at nine o'clock.

On Monday and Tuesday the Congress met and adjourned, to give the committees time to bring in their report,

WEDNESDAY, June 7, 1775.

The Congress met according to adjournment.

The committee appointed to make an estimate of the money necessary t« be raised, brought in their report, which was read and referred to the committee of the whole.

On motion, Resolved, That Thursday the 20th of July next, be observed throughout the twelve United Colonies, as a day of humiliation, fasting and prayer: and that Mr. Hooper, Mr. J. Adams, and Mr. Paine, be a committee to bring in a resolve for that purpose.

The committee appointed to prepare advice in answer to the letter from the convention of Massachusetts-Bay, brought in their report, which was read, and ordered to lie on the table for consideration.

Agreeable to the order of the day, the Congress resolved themselves into a committee of. the whole, to take into their farther consideration the state of America; after sometime spent thereon, the president resumed the chair; and Mr. Ward reported, that the committee had proceeded in the business referred to them, but not having come to a conclusion, desired him to move for leave to sit again.

Resolved, That this Congress will, to-morrow, agaia resolve themselves into a committee of the whole, to take into their farther consideration the state of America; and that this be a standing order till the business is completed.

Adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock.

THURSDAY, June 8, 1775.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress being informed, that a major Skene, with some other officers, ■who arrived last evening, in a vessel from London, were, with their papers, in. the custody of the troops of this city; that the said Skene had lately been appointed governor of the forts of Ticonderoga, and Crown-Point; that one of the officers with him, is a lieutenant in the regulars, now in the province of 'Quebec; and moreover, that the said Skene had declared, that he has authority to raise a regiment in America; from all this, apprehending that the said Skene is a dangerous partizan of administration, and that his papers may contain intelligence of ministerial designs against America, very important to be known.

Resolved, That a committee be appointed to examine the papers of the said Skene and lieutenant, in their presence.

That the committee consist of Mr. J. Adams, Mr. Deane.and Mr. Mifflin:

That the said committee be upon honor to conceal whatever, of a private nature, may come to their knowledge by such examination; and that they communicate, to this Congress, what they shall discover relative to the present dispute, between Great-Britain and America.

The remainder of the day being spent in a committee of the whole, on the state of America, the Congress adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock.

FRIDAY June 9, 1775.

Met according to adjournment.

The report of the committee, on the letter from the convention of Massachusetts-Bay, being again read, the Congress came to the following resolution:

Resolved, That no obedience being due to the act of parliament for altering the charter of the colony of Massachusetts-Bay, not to a governor, or a lieutenant-governor, who will nor observe the directions of, but endeavour to subvert that charter, the governor and lieutenant-governor of that colony are to be considered as absent, and their offices vacant; and as there is no council there, and the inconveniencies, arising from the suspension of the powers of government, are intolerable, especially at a time when general Gage hath actually levied war, and is carrying on hostilities, against his majesty's peaceable and loyal subjects of that colony; that, in order to conform, as near as may be, to the spirit and substance of the charter, it be recommended to the provincial convention, to write letters to the inhabitants of the several places, which are entitled to representation in assembly, requesting them to chuse such representatives, and that the asssembly, when chosen, do elect councillors; and that such assembly, or council, exercise the powers of government, until a governor, of his majesty's appointment, will consent to govern the colony according to its charter.

Ordered, that the president transmit a copy of the above to the convention of Massachusetts-Bay.

Adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock.

SATURDAY, June 10, 1775.

Met according to adjournment.

Sundry letters, from Massachusetts-Bay, Ticonderoga, Crown-Point, &c. being laid before the Congress, were read; and the same being taken into consideration, the Congress came to the following resolutions:

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