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Hastings, and James Brown, of Lexington, in the county of Middlesex, and colony of the Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England, and all of lawful age, do testify and say, that, on the morning of the nineteenth of April instant, about one or two o'clock, being informed, that a number of regular officers had been riding up and down the road the evening and night preceding, and that some of the inhabitants, as they were passing, had been insulted by the officers, and stopped by them; and being also informed, that the regular troops were on their inarch from Boston, in order (as it was said) to take the colony stores, then deposited at Concord, we met on the parade of our company in this town; after the company had collected, we were ordered, by captain Parker, (who commanded us) to disperse for the present, and to- be ready to attend the beat of the drum, and accordingly the company went into houses near the place of parade. We further testify and say, that, about five o'clock in the morning, we attended the beat of our drum, and were formed on the parade; we were faced towards the regulars then inarching up to us, and some of our company were coming to the parade with their backs towards the troops, and others on the parade, began to disperse when the regulars fired on the company, before a gun was fired by anyof our company on them. They killed eight of our company, and wounded several, and continued their fire, until we had all made our escape. "Signed by each of the deponents."

L X1NGTON, April 25, 1775.

"I, Timothy Smith, of Lexington, in the county of Middlesex, and colony of Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England, being of lawful age, do testify and declare, that, on the morning of the nineteenth of April instant, being on Lexington common, as a spectator, I saw a large body of regular troops marching up towards the Lexington company, then dispersing, and likewise saw the regular troops fire on the Lexington company, before the latter fired a gun; I immediately ran, and a volley was discharged at me, which put me in imminent danger of losing my life; 1 soon returned to (he common, and saw eight of the Lexington men who were killed, and lay bleeding at a considerable distance from each other j and several were wounded: And further faith not.

"TIMOTHY SMITH."

LEXINGTON, April 25, 1775. "We, Levi Mead and Levi Harrington, both of Lexington, in the county of Middlesex, and colony of Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England, and of lawful age, do testify and declare, that on the morning of the nineteenth of April, being on Lexington commons, as spectators, we saw a large body of regular troops marching up towards the Lexington company, and some of the regulars, on horses, whom we took to be officers, fired a pistol or two on the Lexington company, which was then dispersing: These were the first guns that were fired, and they were immediately followed by several vollies from the regu-, lars, by which eight men, belonging to said company, were killed, and several wounded.

"LEVI HARRINGTON, •' LEVI MEAD."

LEXINGTON, Aprtl25, 1775. "I, William Draper, of lawful age, and au inhabitant of Colrain, in the county of Hampshire, and colony of Massachusettts-Bay.in New-England, do testify and declare, that, being on the parade of said Lexington, April 19th instant, about half an hour before sunrise, the king's regular troops appeared at the meeting-house of Lexington. Captain Parker's company, who were drawn up back of said meeting-house on the parade, turned from said troops, making their escape, by dispersing; in the mean time, the regular troops made an huzza, and ran towards captain Parker's company, who were dispersing, and, immediately after the huzza was made, the commanding officer of said troops (as I took him) gave the command to the said troops, fire !" fire! damn you, fire!" and immediately, they fired before any of captain Parker's company fired, I then being within three or four rods of said regular troops: And further sav not.

"WILLIAM DRAPER."

LEXINGTON, April 23,1775. "I, Thomas Fessenden, of lawful age, testify and declare, that, being in a pasture near the meeting-house, at said Lexington, on Wednesday last, at about half an hour before sunrise, 1 saw a number of regular troops pass speedily by said meeting-house, on their way towards a company of militia'of said Lexington, who were assembled to the number of about one hundred in a company, at the distance of eighteen or twenty rods from said meeting-house; and after they had passed by said meeting-house, I saw three officers, on horseback, advance to the front of said regulars, when one of them, being within six rods of the said militia, cried out," disperse, you rebels, immediately," on which he brandished his sword over his head three times; meanwhile the second officer, who was about two rods behind him, fired a pistol, pointed at said militia, and the regulars kept huzzaing till he had finished brandishing his sword, and when he had thus finished brandishing his sword, he pointed it down towards said militia, and immediately on which the said regulars fired a volley at the militia, and then I ran off as fast as I could, while they continued firing, till I got out of their reach. I further testify, that as soon as ever the officer cried " disperse, you rebels," the said company of militia dispersed every way, as fast as they could, and, while they were dispersing, the regulars kept firing at them incessantly: And further saith not.

"THOMAS FESSENDEN."

LINCOLN, April'ZS, 1775. "I, John Bateinan, belonging to the iifty-second regiment, commanded by colonel Jones, on Wednesday morning, on the 19th day of April instant, was in the party marching to Concord, being at Lexington, in the county of Middlesex, beingnigh the meeting-house in said Lexington, there was a small party of men gathered together in that place, when our said troops marched by, and I testify and declare, that I heard the word of command given to the troops to fire, and some of said troops did fire, and I saw one of said small party lay dead on the ground nigh said meeting-house; and I testify, that I never heard any of the inhabitants so much as fire one gun on said stroops.

"JOHN BATEMAN."

LEXINGTON, April 23, 1775. "We, John Hoar, John Whithcad, Abraham Garfield, Benjamin Munroe, Isaac Parks, William Hosmcr, John Adams, Gregory Stone, all of Lincoln, in the county of Middlesex, Massachusetts-Bay, all of lawful age, do testify and say, that, on Wednesday last, we were assembled at Concord, in the morning of said day,-in consequence of information received, that a brigade of regular troops were on their march to the said town of Concord, who had killed six men at the town of Lexington; about an hour afterwards we saw them approaching, to the number, as we apprehended, of about twelve hundred, on which we retreated to a hill about eighty rods back, and the said troops then took possession ot the hill, where we were first posted; presently after this, we saw the troops moving towards the north bridge, about one mile from tlve said Concord meeting-house; we then immediately went before them and passed the bridge juat before a party of them, to the number of about two hundred, arrived ; they there left about one half of their two hundred at the bridge, and proceeded, with the rest, towards col. Barrett's, about two miles from the mdi bridge; we then seeing several fires in the town, thought the houses in Concord were in danger, and marched towards the said bridge; and the troops that were stationed were, observing our approach, marched back over the bridge and then took up some of the planks; we then hastened our march towards the bridge, and when we had got near the bridge, they fired on our men, first three guns, one after the other, and then a considerable number more; and then, and not before (having orders from our commanding officers not to fire till we were fired upon) we fired upon the regulars and they retreated. On their retreat through the town of Lexington-to Charlestovvn, they ravaged and destroyed private property, and burnt three houses, one barn and one shop.

"Signed by each of the above deponents."

LEXINGTON, April 23, 1775. "We, Nathan Barrot, captain; Jonathan Farrar, Joseph Butler, and Francis Wheeler, lieutenants; John Barret, ensign ; John Brown, Silas Walker, Ephraim Melvin, Nathan Buttrick, Stephen Hosmer, jun. Samuel Barret, Thomas Jones, Joseph Chandler, Peter Wheeler, Nathan Pierce, and Edward Richardson, all of Concord, in the county of Middlesex, in the province of Massachusetts-Bay, of lawful age, testify and declare, that on Wednesday, the nineteenth instant, about an hour after sun-rise, we assembled on a hill near the meeting-house, in Concord aforesaid, in consequence of an information, that a number of regular troops had killed six of our countrymen, at Lexington, and were on their march to said Concord; and about an hour afterwards, we saw them approaching, to the number, as we imagine, of about twelve hundred; on which we retreated to a hill about eighty rods back, and the aforesaid troops then took possession of ,Ja hill where we were first posted. Presently after this, we saw them moving towards the north bridge, about one mile from the said meeting-house; we then immediately went before them, and passed the bridge just before a party of them, to the number of about two hundred, arrived. They there left about one half of these two hundred at the bridge, and proceeded with the rest towards colonel Barrett's, about two miles from the said bridge. We then seeing several fires in the town, thought our house* were in danger, and immediately marched back towards said bridge, and the troops who were stationed there, observing our approach, marched back over the bridge, and then took up some of the planks. We then hastened our steps towards the bridge, and when we had got near the bridge, they fired on our men, first three guns, one after the other, and then a considerable number more; upon which, and not before, (having orders from our commanding officer not to fire till we were fired upon) we fared upon the regulars, and they retreated. At Concord, and on their retreat through Lexington, they plundered many houses, burnt tl>ree at Lexington, together with a shop and barn, and committed damage, more or less, to almost every house from Concord to Charlestown.

"Signed by the above deponents."

"We, Joseph Butler, and Ephraim Melvin, do testify and declare, that when the regular troops fired upon our people, at the north bridge, in Concord, a»related in the foregoing depositions, they shot one, and we believe two, of our people before we fired a single gun at them.

"JOSEPH BUTLER,

Lucingtott, April&S, 1775. "EPHRAIM MELVIN."

CONCOKD, April 23, 1775. "I, Timothy Minot, jun. of Concord, on the nineteenth day of this instant, April, after that I had heard of the regular troops firing upon Lexington men, aad fearing that hostilities might be committed at Concord, thought it my incumbent duty to secure my family.—After I had secured my family, some time after that, returning towards my own dwelling, and finding that the bridge on the north part of said Concord, was guarded by regular troops, being a spectator of what had happened at said bridge, declare, that the regular troops stationed on said bridge, after they saw the men that were collected on the westerly side of said bridge, marched towards said bridge, then the troops returned towards the easterly side of said bridge, and formed themselves, as I thought, for regular fight: after that they fired one gun, then two or three more, before the men that were stationed on the westerly part of said bridge fired on them. "TIMOTHY Minot.jun."

•'' . LEXINGTON, April 23, 177S.

"I, James Barrett, of Concord, colonel of a regiment of militia, in the

county of Middlesex, do testify and say, that, on Wednesday morning last,

about day-break, 1 was informed of the approach of a number of the regular

troops to the town of Concord, where were some magazines belonging to this

Erovince, when there was assembled some of the militia of this and the neighorvng towns, 1 ordered them to march to the north bridge (so called) winch they had passed and were taking up. I ordered said militia to march to said bridge and pass the same, but not to fire on the king's troops unless they were first fired upon. We advanced near said bridge, when the said troops fired upon our militia, and killed two men dead on the spot, and wounded several others, which was the first firing of guns in the town of Concord: my detachment then returned the fire, which killed and wounded several of the king's troops.

"JAMES BARRETT."

LEXINGTON, April 23, 1775. "We, Bradbury Robinson, Samuel Spring, Thaddeus Bancroft, all of Concord; and James Adams, of Lexington, all in the county of Middlesex, all of lawful age, do testify and say, that on Wednesday morning last, near ten of the clock, we saw near one hundred of the regular troops, being in the town of Concord, at the north bridge in said town (so called) and having passed the same, they were taking up said bridge, when about three hundred of our militia were advancing toward said bridge, in order to pass said bridge, when, without saying any thing to us, they discharged a number of guns on us, which killed two men dead on the spot, and wounded several others; when we returned the fire on them, which killed two of them, and wounded several, which was the beginning of hostilities in the town of Concord.

"BRADBURY ROBINSON,
"SAMUEL SPRING,
"THADDEUS BANCROFT,
"JAMES ADAMS."

WORCESTER, April 26, 1775. "Hannah Bradish, of that part of Cambridge, called Menotomy, and daughter of Timothy Paine, of Worcester, in the county of Worcester, esq. of lawful age, testifies and says, that about five o'clock on Wednesday last, afternoon, being in her«bed- chamber, with her infant child, about eight days old, she was surprised by the firing of the king's troops and our people, bn their return from Concord. She being weak and unable to go out of her house, in order to secure herse,lf and family, thev all retired into the kitchen, in the back part of the house. She soon found the house surrounded with the king's troops; that upon observation made, at least seventy bullets were shot into the front part of the house; several bullets lodged in the kitchen where she was, and one passed through an easy chair she nad just gone from. The door of the front part of the nouse was broken open; she did not see any soldiers in the house, but supposed, by the noise, they were in the front. After the troops had gone oft, she missed the following things, which, she verily believes, were taken out of the house by the king's troops, viz: one rich brocade gown. called a negligee, one lutestring gown, one white quilt, one pair of brocade shoes, three shifts, eight white aprons, three caps, one case of ivory knives and forks, and several other small articles.

"HANNAH BRADISH." Province of the ) Ir , a ., . - , _„_

Massachusetts-Bay, { WTM*^r> ss- -«P"* 26, 1775.

"Mrs. Hannah Bradish, the above deponent, maketh oath before us, the subscribers, two of his majesty'9 justices of the peace, for the county of Worcester, and of the quorum, that the above deposition, according to her best recollection, is the truth. Which deposition is taken in perpetuam rei memoriam.

"THOMAS STEEL,
"TIMOTHY PAINE."

CONCORD, April 23, 1775.

_ "I, James Marr, of lawful age, testify and say, that in the evening of the eighteenth instant, I received orders from George Hutchinson, adjutant of the fourth regiment of the regular troops stationed at Boston, to prepare and march: to which orders I attended, and marched to Concord, where I was ordered by an officer with about one hundred men, to guard a certain bridge there; while attending that service, a number of people came along, in order, as I suppose, to cross said bridge, at which time a number of the regular troops first fired upon them.

"JAMES MARR."

MEDFORD, April 25, 1775.

"I, Edward Thoroton Gould, of his majesty's own regiment of foot, being of lawful age, do testify and declare, that on the evening of the eighteenth instant, under the orders of general Gaee, I embarked with the light infantry and grenadiers of the line, commanded Dy colonel Smith, and landed on the marshes of Cambridge, from whence we proceeded to Lexington; on our arrival at that place, we saw a body of provincial troops armed, to the number of about sixty or seventy men; on our approach, they dispersed, and soon after firing began, but which party fired first, I cannot exactly say, as our troops rushed on shouting, and huzzaing, previous to the firing, which was continued by our troops, so long as any of the provincials were to be seen. From thence we marched to Concord. On a hill near the entrance of the town, we saw another body of provincials assembled; the light infantry companies were ordered up the hill to disperse them; on our approach, they retreated towards Concord; the grenadiers continued the road under the hill towards the town. Six companies of light infantry were ordered down to take possession of the bridge, which the provincials retreated over; the company I commanded was one: three companies of the above detachment went forwards about two miles; in the mean time, the provincial troops returned, to the number of about three or four hundred: we drew up on the Concord side of the bridge, the provincials came down upon us, upon which we engaged and gave the first fire; this was the first engagement alter the one at Lexington; a continued firing from both parties lasted through the whole day; I myself was wounded at the attack of the bridge, and am now treated with the greatest humanity, and taken all possible care of by the provincials at Medford.

"EDWARD THOROTON GOULD. Lieut.

King's own Regiment"

Vol. I. 9

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