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REVIEWS AND BOOK NOTICES.

Diet Lists and Sick-Roon Dietary-By Jerome B. Thomav, M D., Visiting Physician to the Home for Friendless Women and Children and to the Newsboys' home; Assisting Visiting Physician to the Kings County Hospital; Assistant Bacteriologist Brooklyn Health Department, issued in neat book form, strongly bound in cloth, price $1.50. Contains 160 detachable (perforated) Diet Lists for Albuminuria, Anæmia and Debility, Constipation, Diabetes, Diarrhoea, Dyspepsia, Fevers, Gout or Uric-acid Diathesis, Obesity, and Tuberculosis, also 40 detachable sheets of Sickroom Dietary, containing full instructions for preparation of easily digested food necessary for invalids. Each list is numbered only, the disease for which it is to be used in no case being mentioned-an index key being reserved for the physician's private use. W. B. Saunders, Pub.

Twentieth Century Practice. An international encyclopedia of modern medical science. By leading authorities of Europe and America. Edited by Thos. L Stedman, M.D., New York City. In twenty volumes. Volume VI. "Diseases of the Respiratory organs." New York: William Wood and Company. 1895.

The opening article is naturally one upon the "Diseases of the Nose." This is from the pen of Dr. Prosser James of London, the possessor of a graceful literary style, who has given us one of the most readable articles in the book. Following this is an article on the Diseases of the Accessory Sinuses of the Nose, by Dr. Johathan Wright of Brooklyn. Two articles, one on Diseases of the Naso-Pharynx and Pharynx" and the other on the "Diseases of the Tonsils," are by Dr. E. J. Moure of Bordeaux, who is recognized as the leading French authority on affections of the upper air passages. Dr. A. H. Buck of New York, treats of Diseases of the Ears" in his usual clear and easy style. Proceeding downward, we come to the Larynx," the diseases of which are handled in a very satisfactory manner by Dr. F. Bosworth of New York. All of the affections of the upper air passages just mentioned are treated from

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the point of view of the general practitioner rather than from that of the specialist. Sir Thomas Granger Stewart and Dr. George A. Gibson of Edinburgh, have written in collaboration upon the "Diseases of the Trachea and Bronchial Tubes," the result of their combined labors being an excellent treaties on the pathology and treatment of these harassing complaints. The author of the concluding article is Dr. Winslow Anderson of San Francisco. His subject is the Diseases of the Lungs," except Tuberculosis and Croupous Pneumonia, two affections which will be considered in a later volume along with ihe other infectious diseases.

A Manual of Syphilis and the Venereal DiseasesBy James Nevins Hyde, M. D., Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Rush Medical College, Chicago, profusely illustrated, double number, price $2.50 net. This manual is intended as a thoroughly practical guide, and represents the latest knowledge of the Veneral Diseases which are included under the heads of Syphilis, and Gonorrhoea and its complications, with very complete instructions for their diagnosis and carefully prepared instructions for their treatment, cure and alleviation.

The illustrations (some of which are colored) have been selected with the greatest possible care, and with the view of elucidating the text. W. B. Saunders, Pub.

NEWS OF THE MONTH.

Sleeping Rooms -Oil stoves and gas stoves should never be kept burning in a sleeping room, for they are burned in the open air of the room, and having no connection with a chimney-flue, throw the poisonous carbonic oxide of combustion into the air of the apartment and make it unfit for respiration.

Corneal Ulcer.-Aristol i recommended in powder form for indolent corneal ulcerations with supporating base. It is thick y applied with a brush and the eye kept closed for a time. A five per cent. ointment is useful in ulcerative blepharitis, being preferable to the yellow precipitate ointment on account of its causing less irritation. This ointment has given good results in obstinate, recurring hordeola when rubbed into the edges of the lids at night. Heuse.

It is said that oil of eucalyptus, frequently, applied with a camel's hair pencil over the surface chilblains, relieves pain and soon cures them.-Exchange.

Predisposition of Persons to Consumption. Many people think that consumption is inherited, but the closest investigation has shown that it is not inherited and that only the susceptibility or liability to the disease is inherited. Thus the children of a tubercular family do not necessarily inherit the disease itself, but they inherit the constitution, which, when exposed to the germ, funishes a soil which propagates the diseasd with great rapidity, and one after the other succumbs.

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Contains the Essential Elements of the Animal Organization-Potash and Lime;
The Oxidizing Agents-Iron and Maganese;

The Tonics-Quinine and Strychnine;

And the Vitalizing Constituent-Phosphorus; the whole Combined in the form of a Syrup with a Slightly Alkaline Reaction.

It Differs in its Effects from all Analogous Preparations; and it possesses all the important properties of being pleasant to the taste, easily borne by the stomach, and harmles under prolonged use.

It has Gained a Wide Reputation, particularly in the treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Chronic Bronchitis, and other affections of the respiratory organs. It has also been employed with much success in various nervous and debilitating diseases.

Its Curative Power is largely attributable to its stimulant, tonic and nutritive properties, by means of which the energy of the system is recruited.

Its Action is Prompt; it stimulates the appetite and the digestion, it promotes assimilation and it enters directly into circulation with the food products.

The prescribed dose produces a feeling of bouyancy and removes depression and melancholy; HENCE

THE PREPARATION IS OF GREAT VALUE IN THE TREATMENT OF MENTAL AND NERVOUS AFFEC

TIONS.

From the fact, also, that it exerts a double tonic influence, and induces a healthy flow of the secretions, its use is indicated in a wide range of diseases.

NOTICE-CAUTION.

The success of Fellows' Syrup of Hypophosphites has tempted certain persons to offer imitations for sale. Mr. Fellows, who has examined samples of several of these, finds that no two of them are identical, and that all of them differ from the original in composition, in freedom from acid reaction, in susceptibility to effects of oxygen when exposed to light or heat, in the property of retaining the strychnine in solution, and in the medicinal effects.

As these cheap and inefficient substitutes are frequently dispensed instead of the genuine preparation, physicians are earnestly requested, when prescribing the Syrup, to write "Syr. Hypophos. Fellows."

As a further precaution, it is advisable that the syrup should be ordered in the original bottles; the distinguishing marks which the bot tles (and the wrappers surrounding them) bear, can then be examined, and the genuineness-or otherwise-of the contents thereby proved.

Medical Letters may be addressed to

Mr. FELLOWS, 48 Vesey Street, New York.

Contains the Essential Elements of the Animal Organization-Potash and Lime;
The Oxidizing Agents-Iron and Maganese;

The Tonics-Quinine and Strychnine;

And the Vitalizing Constituent-Phosphorus; the whole Combined in the form of a Syrup with a Slightly Alkaline Reaction.

It Differs in its Effects from all Analogous Preparations; and it possesses all the important properties of being pleasant to the taste, easily borne by the stomach, and harmless under prolonged use.

It has Gained a Wide Reputation, particularly in the treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Chronic Bronchitis, and other affections of the respiratory organs. It has also been employed with much success in various nervous and debilitating diseases.

Its Curative Power is largely attributable to its stimulant, tonic and nutritive properties, by means of which the energy of the system is recruited.

Its Action is Prompt; it stimulates the appetite and the digestion, it promotes assimilation and it enters directly into circulation with the food products.

The prescribed dose produces a feeling of bouyancy and removes depression and melancholy; HENCE

THE PREPARATION IS OF GREAT VALUE IN THE TREATMENT OF MENTAL AND NERVOUS AFFEC

TIONS.

From the fact, also, that it exerts a double tonic influence, and induces a healthy flow of the secretions, its use is indicated in a wide range of diseases.

NOTICE-CAUTION.

The success of Fellows' Syrup of Hypophosphites has tempted certain persons to offer imitations for sale. Mr. Fellows, who has examined samples of several of these, finds that no two of them are identical, and that all of them differ from the original in composition, in freedom from acid reaction, in susceptibility to effects of oxygen when exposed to light or heat, in the property of retaining the strychnine in solution, and in the medicinal effects.

As these cheap and inefficient substitutes are frequently dispensed instead of the genuine preparation, physicians are earnestly requested, when prescribing the Syrup, to write "Syr. Hypophos. Fellows."

As a further precaution, it is advisable that the syrup should be ordered in the original bottles; the distinguishing marks which the bottles (and the wrappers surrounding them) bear, can then be examined, and the genuineness-or otherwise-of the contents thereby proved.

Medical Letters may be addressed to

Mr. FELLOWS, 48 Vesey Street, New York.

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