The Pilgrim's Progress in Modern English

Front Cover
Bridge Logos Foundation, 1998 - Fiction - 450 pages
21 Reviews
Carefully revised in modern English, this modern classic includes Bunyan's original scripture references plus hundreds of additional references, chapter end-notes to help clarify scriptural and historical references, and an Index of words, meanings, titles, characters, and places. 50+ illustrations.

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Review: The Pilgrim's Progress in Modern English, Updated Edition

User Review  - Morgan - Christianbook.com

I am so glad to have a copy of Pilgrim's Progress in modern English again even though I truly appreciate the original version written by Bunyan. The modern English does not lose any of the story's ... Read full review

Review: The Pilgrim's Progress in Modern English, Updated Edition

User Review  - Matthew Terboss - Christianbook.com

The book has a nice updated translation with notes on why they changed some of the word along with the book is a study guide which is nice for family reading or youth group. Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
7
IV
15
V
27
VI
33
VII
47
VIII
53
IX
61
XXI
197
XXII
211
XXIV
233
XXV
235
XXVI
253
XXVII
263
XXVIII
283
XXIX
297

X
77
XI
91
XII
103
XIII
121
XIV
135
XV
153
XVI
163
XVIII
169
XIX
181
XX
187
XXX
321
XXXI
335
XXXII
353
XXXIV
369
XXXV
383
XXXVI
391
XXXVII
399
XXXVIII
409
XXXIX
419
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

John Bunyan was born in Elstow, Bedfordshire, England, in 1628. He learned to read and write at the village school and was prepared to follow his father's trade as a brazier when the English Civil War broke out in 1644 and he was drafted into the Parliamentary army. His military service brought him into contact with Oliver Cromwell's Puritan troops. Beginning in 1648, Bunyan suffered a crisis in religious faith that lasted for several years. He turned to the Nonconformist church in Bedford to sustain him during this period. His first writings were attacks against the Quakers. Then Charles II was restored to the throne and Bunyan was arrested for conducting services not in accordance with the Church of England. He spent 12 years in jail. During this time, he wrote his autobiography, Grace Abounding, in which he described his spiritual struggle and growth. During his last years in prison, Bunyan began his most famous work, The Pilgrim's Progress, a two-part allegorical tale of the character Christian and his journey to salvation. Part I was published in 1678 and Part II in 1684. The second part deals with the spiritual journey of Christian's wife and sons, as they follow in his footsteps. With its elements of the folktale tradition, The Pilgrim's Progress became popular immediately. Well into the nineteenth century it was a book known to almost every reader in England and New England, second in importance only to the Bible. So great was the book's influence that it even plays a major role in Little Woman by Louisa May Alcott. Such expressions as "the slough of despond" and "vanity fair" have become part of the English language. Bunyan's other works include The Life and Death of Mr. Badman and The Holy War. He also wrote A Book for Boys and Girls, verses on religious faith for children. Bunyan died in London on August 31, 1688.

L. Edward Hazelbaker has edited two other Pure Gold Classics. The Pilgrim's Progress, and Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners.

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