The Archaeology of Early Egypt: Social Transformations in North-East Africa, C.10,000 to 2,650 BC

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Cambridge University Press, May 25, 2006 - Social Science - 343 pages
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In this authoritative and compelling 2006 survey of the archaeology of early Egypt, David Wengrow offers an interpretation of the emergence of farming economies and the dynastic state, c.10,000 to 2,650 BC. Exploring key themes such as the nature of state power, kingship and the inception of writing, Wengrow illuminates prehistoric social development along the Nile through comparison with neighbouring regions. Detailed analysis of the archaeological record reveals the interplay between large-scale processes of economic and political change and intimate material practices through which social identities were transformed, focussing upon ritual treatments of the dead. Employing rich empirical data and engaging critically with anthropological theory and the history of archaeological thought, Wengrow's work challenges the theoretical isolation of Egyptian prehistory and breaches the methodological boundaries that separate prehistory from Egyptology. It is essential reading for anybody with an interest in ancient Egyptian civilisation or early state formation.
 

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There is a 'worts and all' review of this book by Dr. G. Newell. Too long to paste here but well worth a look if you are thinking of buying this book.

Contents

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Figure 75 Agricultural scenes in the tomb chapel of Imeri
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Dynasty The longterm significance of this shift resided in a
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About the author (2006)

David Wengrow is a Lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, where he has established a new program of study comparing ancient societies of the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean.

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