Rautahi: The Maori of New Zealand

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Psychology Press, 2004 - Social Science - 416 pages
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A comprehensive study of the Maori in New Zealand, this book covers Maori history and culture, language and art and includes chapters on the following:
Basic concepts in Maori culture
Land
Kinship
Education
Association
Leadership & social control
The Marae
Hui
Maori and Pakeha
Maori spelling and pronunciation
There is an extensive glossary, bibliography and index.
First published in 1967. This edition reprints the revised edition of 1976.
 

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Contents

The Maoris before 18001
1
The years between
29
Maoris and Maori culture today
39
Basic concepts in Maori culture
54
The bases of daily living
75
Language
95
Land
107
Kinship
121
Association
171
Leadership and social control
200
The Marae
227
ffui
246
Literature and art
265
Maori and Pakeha
289
Maori spelling and pronunciation
332
Glossary
334

Descent and descentgroups
127
Marriage and family
139
Education
151

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About the author (2004)

Joan Metge was born in 1930 in Auckland, New Zealand. She is an anthropologist by training. She is well known for her groundbreaking research in Maori communities and the so-called urban drift of the mid twentieth century. She attended Auckland University College, where she studied Geography, French and German, completed an MA thesis on Maori population movements and, in 1958, completed a PhD in Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics. She published her thesis as her first book, A New Maori Migration: Urban and Rural Relations in Northern New Zealand. Since then she has published a number of important books on Maori history and society and on cross-cultural communication, including The Maoris of New Zealand (1967/1976), Talking Past Each Other (1978/1984 ), New Growth From Old and Korero Tahi (AUP). Her famous work Rautahi: The Maoris of New Zealand was republished by Routledge in 2004. Joan Metge was awarded the nonfiction prize in the 2015 New Zealand Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement.