Race, Racism, and Science: Social Impact and Interaction

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Rutgers University Press, 2006 - Social Science - 401 pages

Since the eighteenth century when natural historians created the idea of distinct racial categories, scientific findings on race have been a double-edged sword. For some antiracists, science holds the promise of one day providing indisputable evidence to help eradicate racism. On the other hand, science has been enlisted to promote racist beliefs ranging from a justification of slavery in the eighteenth century to the infamous twentieth-century book, The Bell Curve, whose authors argued that racial differences in intelligence resulted in lower test scores for African Americans.

This well-organized, readable textbook takes the reader through a chronological account of how and why racial categories were created and how the study of “race” evolved in multiple academic disciplines, including genetics, psychology, sociology, and anthropology. In a bibliographic essay at the conclusion of each of the book's seven sections, the authors recommend primary texts that will further the reader's understanding of each topic. Heavily illustrated and enlivened with sidebar biographies, this text is ideal for classroom use.

 

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Contents

The Origins of Racial Science Antiquity1800
1
Along the Color Line
3
The Age of Exploration
7
Opinion
13
The Atlantic Slave System
20
The Establishment of Racial Typology 18001859
29
Prichard and Lawrence
35
Morton Nott and Gliddon
45
Genetics and the Critique of Eugenics
153
Bibliographic Essay
159
The Geneticists Manifesto
165
Experts in Prejudice
173
The PostMyrdal Liberal Orthodoxy
181
The Damage Argument188
188
The UNESCO Statements on Race
197
What to Read
232

Polygenism in the Land of Pnchard
52
Race and Evolution 18591900
61
Darwin and Wallace on Natural Selection and Human Origins
67
The Hardening of Scientific Racism 19001945
97
The Rise of Nordicism
105
Bibliographic Essay
125
Boasian Anthropology and Black Folklore
137
Psychologists and the Critique of IQ Testing
144
Chronology
237
Glossary
243
Documents
255
Bibliography
371
Index 887
387
About the Authors
403
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Nadine Weidman is a lecturer in history of science at the Harvard University Extension School and the author of Constructing Scientific Psychology: Karl Lashley's Mind-Brain Debates.

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