Letters Concerning the English Nation

Front Cover
C. Davis, 1741 - 255 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
9
III
13
IV
20
V
28
VI
34
VII
38
VIII
42
XIV
89
XV
99
XVI
114
XVII
121
XVIII
132
XIX
143
XX
152
XXI
156

IX
48
X
56
XI
60
XII
68
XIII
77
XXII
167
XXIII
176
XXIV
183
XXV
197

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 175 - And screen'd in shades from day's detested glare, She sighs for ever on her pensive bed, Pain at her side, and Megrim at her head.
Page 20 - ... how hateful the oppressor is both to God and man: If after all these warnings and advertisements, thou dost not turn unto the Lord with all thy heart, but forget him, who remembered thee in thy distress, and give up thyself to follow lust and vanity; surely great will be thy condemnation.
Page 174 - For, that sad moment, when the sylphs withdrew, And Ariel weeping from Belinda flew, Umbriel, a dusky, melancholy sprite, As ever sullied the fair face of light, Down to the central earth, his proper scene, Repair'd to search the gloomy cave of Spleen.
Page 151 - He spoke of his works as of trifles that were beneath him; and hinted to me, in our first conversation, that I should visit him upon no other foot than that of a gentleman, who led a life of plainness and simplicity. I answered, that had he been so unfortunate as to be a mere gentleman, I should never have come to see him...
Page 141 - Yet, fooled with hope, men favour the deceit; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay: To-morrow's falser than the former day; Lies worse, and, while it says, we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest.
Page 6 - I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire...
Page 38 - There the Jew, the Mahometan, and the Christian transact together, as though they all professed the same religion, and give the name of infidel to none but bankrupts. There the Presbyterian confides in the Anabaptist, and the Churchman depends on the Quaker's word. At the breaking up of this pacific and free assembly, some withdraw to the synagogue, and others to take a glass. This man goes and is...
Page 137 - Ham. To be, or not to be : that is the queftion— — — Whether 'tis nobler in the mind, to fuffer The flings and arrows of outragious fortune j Or to take arms againft a fea of troubles, * And by oppofing end them. -To die— —to fleep...
Page 39 - If one religion only were allowed in England, the Government would very possibly become arbitrary; if there were but two, the people would cut one another's throats; but as there are such a multitude, they all live happy and in peace.
Page 60 - In France the title of marquis is given gratis to any one who will accept of it; and whosoever arrives at Paris from the midst of the most remote provinces with money in his purse, and a name terminating in ac or ille, may strut about, and cry, " Such a man as I ! A man of my rank and figure...

Bibliographic information