Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials

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Little, Brown, Nov 7, 2017 - Social Science - 8 pages
In Kids These Days, early Wall Street occupier Malcolm Harris gets real about why the Millennial generation has been wrongly stereotyped, and dares us to confront and take charge of the consequences now that we are grown up.
Millennials have been stereotyped as lazy, entitled, narcissistic, and immature. We've gotten so used to sloppy generational analysis filled with dumb clichés about young people that we've lost sight of what really unites Millennials. Namely:

We are the most educated and hardworking generation in American history. We poured historic and insane amounts of time and money into preparing ourselves for the 21st-century labor market. We have been taught to consider working for free (homework, internships) a privilege for our own benefit. We are poorer, more medicated, and more precariously employed than our parents, grandparents, even our great grandparents, with less of a social safety net to boot.

Kids These Days is about why. In brilliant, crackling prose, early Wall Street occupier Malcolm Harris gets mercilessly real about our maligned birth cohort. Examining trends like runaway student debt, the rise of the intern, mass incarceration, social media, and more, Harris gives us a portrait of what it means to be young in America today that will wake you up and piss you off.

Millennials were the first generation raised explicitly as investments, Harris argues, and in Kids These Days he dares us to confront and take charge of the consequences now that we are grown up.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - magonistarevolt - LibraryThing

Malcolm Harris is insightful and really, truly cares about his subject. Squeezed from every angle, the room for error in the millenial generation is nil, and the anxiety about performance is palpable ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jonerthon - LibraryThing

While it's difficult (and not necessarily wise) to try to boil down a whole generation's experience into one book, the never-ending litany of media coverage on boomers and millennials sort of demands ... Read full review

Contents

Cover
Go to College
Work Sucks
The Feds
Everybody Is a Star
Behavior Modification
Conclusion
Bop It Solutions
Final Word
Notes

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About the author (2017)

Malcolm Harris is a freelance writer and an editor at the New Inquiry. His work has appeared in the New Republic, Bookforum, the Village Voice, n+1, and the New York Times Magazine. He lives in Philadelphia.

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