Ideology and Economic Reform Under Deng Xiaoping, 1978-1993

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Routledge, 1996 - Political Science - 251 pages
This is a probing study of the interactions between ideological trends and economic reform in the era of Deng Xiaoping. It explores an important but frequently neglected issue in the contemporary study of China - the transformation from the orthodox anti-market doctrine into a more elastic and pro-business one, and from Mao's radical totalitarian approach to Deng's gradualist, developmental, authoritarian approach.
Based on a well-defined theoretical framework, the author makes a critical survey of many primary sources including official documents, policy statements, memoirs and interviews, while exploring the origin and themes of China's major ideological trends since 1978 and how they affected the pace, scope and content of economic reform.
The study focuses on the origin and evolution of Deng's doctrine of 'socialism with Chinese characteristics' and its impact on the reform programme. Wei-Wei Zhang's unique perspective brings out thought-provoking explanations of the nature of Chinese politics under Deng Xiaoping in general, and the politics of China's 'gradual approach' to reform in particular.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Chapter One IDEOLOGY AND CHINAS MODERNIZATION IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
11
FROM THE DEBATE ON THE CRITERION OF TRUTH TO SOCIALISM WITH CHINESE CHARACTERISTICS 19781982
19
FROM NEW VERSIONS OF MARXISM TO THE NEW TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION 19831984
81
FROM THE PLANNED COMMODITY ECONOMY TO THE SECOND CAMPAIGN AGAINST BOURGEOIS LIBERALIZATION 19841987
110
FROM THE PRIMARY STAGE OF SOCIALISM TO SOCIALIST MARKET ECONOMY 19871992
159
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF DENG XIAOPINGS THEORY 19921993
212
CONCLUSIONS
221
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
228
INDEX
240
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About the author (1996)

Wei-Wei Zhang is Research Fellow at the Modern Asia Research Centre, Geneva, and Visiting Professor at the College of Humanities, Fudan University, Shanghai.

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