A New and Complete Grammar, of the French Tongue, in which the Author Has Attempted to Reduce the Construction of the Language to Its Simplest Principles ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1829
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Page 151 - Le mien, la mienne, les miens, les miennes, mine. le tien, la tienne, les tiens, les tiennes, thine. le sien, la sienne, les siens, les siennes, his, hers, its.
Page 123 - Grammarians commonly reckon three degrees of comparison ; the positive, the comparative, and the superlative. The positive is the adjective expressing the quality of an object, without any increase, or diminution, as beau, belle. EXERCISE. A child gentle, amiable, and decile, is beloved by every enfant m. dour, aimable — iiiim
Page 39 - A pronoun is a word used instead of a noun, to prevent the too frequent repetition of the same word.
Page ii - Congress of the United States, entitled "an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned." And also to an act entitled "an act supplementary to an act entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the...
Page 103 - Eoro, the Tagus, and the Douro, in Spain ; the Po, in Italy ; the Thames, and the Severn, in England ; and the Shannon, in Ireland. 3. The principal mountains in Europe are the Daarne...
Page 31 - The possessive adjectives, in French, agree in gender and number with the object possessed, and not with the possessor, as in English.
Page 42 - A verb is a word which signifies to be, to do, or to suffer ; as, I am — I rule — I am ruled.
Page 125 - The adjective is in the superlative degree, when it expresses the quality in a very high, or in its highest state : hence there are two sorts of superlatives, the absolute and the relative. The superlative absolute is formed by putting tres, fort, bien, very, before the adjective ; it is called -absolute, because it does not express any relation to other objects.
Page 95 - When a noun is compounded of two substantives, united by a preposition, the first only takes the sign of the plural ; as, wi arc-en-ciel, a rainbow ; des arcs-enciel, rainbows.

Bibliographic information