A short critical review of the political life of Oliver Cromwell: Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... By the late John Banks, ... With an appendix, ... (Google eBook)

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printed for C. Hitch and L. Hawes; J. Rivington; L. Davis and C. Reymers; S. Crowder; and T. Longman, 1760 - 330 pages
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Page 236 - ... to overrun each corner of the three nations, and overcome with equal facility both the riches of the south and the poverty of the north; to be feared and courted by all foreign...
Page 21 - You must get men of a spirit, and take it not ill what I say I know you will not of a spirit that is likely to go on as far as gentlemen will go, or else you will be beaten still.
Page 21 - I did tell him, you must get men of a spirit. And take it not ill what I say (I know you will not) of a spirit that is likely to go on as far as gentlemen will go, or else I am sure you will be beaten still ; I told him so, I did truly.
Page 290 - Born to command, your princely virtues slept, Like humble David's, while the flock he kept: But when your troubled country call'd you forth, Your flaming courage and your matchless worth, Dazzling the eyes of all that did pretend, To fierce contention gave a prosperous end.
Page 236 - ... estates and lives of three kingdoms as much at his disposal as was the little inheritance of his father, and to be as noble and liberal in the spending of them; and lastly (for there is no end of all the particulars of his glory,) to bequeath all this with one word to his posterity; to die with peace at home, and triumph abroad ; to be buried among kings...
Page 139 - Sir, we have heard what you did at the house in the morning, and before many hours all England will hear it: but, Sir, you are mistaken to think that the parliament is dissolved; for no power under heaven can dissolve them but themselves; therefore take you notice of that.
Page 131 - England that would forsake the royal interest; that he had great courage, industry, and generosity; that he had many friends who would always adhere to him; and that as long as he lived, what condition soever he was in, he would be a thorn in their sides; and therefore, for the good of the commonwealth, he should give his vote against the petition.
Page 16 - Adam, is so far from being an excuse, much less a reason, for rapine and oppression, which the endamaging another without authority is, that it is a great aggravation of it. For the exceeding the bounds of authority is no more a right in a great than in a petty officer, no more justifiable in a king than a constable...
Page 232 - He must have had a wonderful understanding in the natures and humours of men, and as great a dexterity in applying them...
Page 287 - While with a strong and yet a gentle hand, You bridle faction, and our hearts command, Protect us from ourselves, and from the foe, Make us unite, and make us conquer too...

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