Janson's history of art: the western tradition, Volume 2

Front Cover
Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007 - Art - 648 pages
8 Reviews
For courses in the History of Art. Completely rewritten and reorganized, this groundbreaking edition weaves together the most recent scholarship, the most current thinking in art history, and the most innovative digital art library.Experience the new Janson and re-experience the history of art. Long established as the classic and seminal introduction to art of the Western world, the Seventh Edition ofJanson's History of Artis groundbreaking. When Harry Abrams first published theHistory of Artin 1962, John F. Kennedy occupied the White House, and Andy Warhol was an emerging artist. Janson offered his readers a strong focus on Western art, an important consideration of technique and style, and a clear point of view.The History of Art, said Janson, was not just a stringing together of historically significant objects, but the writing of a story about their interconnections, a history of styles and of stylistic change. Janson's text focused on the visual and technical characteristics of the objects he discussed, often in extraordinarily eloquent language. Janson'sHistory of Arthelped to establish the canon of art history for many generations of scholars. The new Seventh Edition introduces the authorship of six distinguished specialists narrating the history of art for today's students. The contribution of multiple authors allows an expert's understanding to permeate each and every part of the text with a currency in art historical thinking and an enhanced discussion of context. The result is a complete rewriting and a weaving together of expert knowledge into a meaningful and powerful presentation of Western art.

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A Beautiful Book

User Review  - cspecialtime - Overstock.com

I love this edition of Janson's book! The quality of the book itself: binding, paper, print and illustrations are what a book dedicated to beauty should be. ... Read full review

Review: History of Art: Western Tradition

User Review  - Witch'sCat - Goodreads

I cannot express how much this book has helped me throughout my high school and college education :D Read full review

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Contents

Preface
xiii
The Early Renaissance
xv
Faculty and Student Resources for Teaching
xix
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

While other collectors of English folk tales rewrote or left out the crude language of the originals, Joseph Jacobs brought the vigor of colloquial English into his folk tale collections, and such memorable phrases as Fee-fi-fo-fum and chinny chin chin remain the strength of his contributions. Jacobs was born in Sydney, Australia, and emigrated to England to attend Cambridge University. His interests at Cambridge were very broad and included history, literature, anthropology, and philosophy. After graduating in 1876, he pursued a full and varied career, writing many essays for various periodicals including a famous series in 1882 on the Russian persecutions of the Jews. Jacobs also made his influence felt as a Jew by editing the first issues of The Jewish Yearbook (1896--99) and serving as president of the Jewish Historical Society. He also edited The Jewish Encyclopedia and, in this capacity, came to the United States in 1900, remaining here for the rest of his life. He later served as professor of English at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City. Jacob's interest in folklore grew out of his studies in anthropology. From 1890 to 1893, he edited Folk Lore, a British journal on the subject. He also edited the Arabian Nights and Aesop's Fables and produced a series of fairy tale books that placed him in a position much like that of his American contemporary, Andrew Lang. These fairy tale collections were the result of regular research in folklore, literature, anthropology, and other fields, and they are, perhaps, the works for which he is best remembered today. Jacobs is praised for translating the preliterary experience of storytelling into literary form while maintaining the rhythms and "feel" of the storytellers of old. He is also noted as being the first writer to prepare folk tales specifically for an audience of children, thus avoiding the more pedantic approach of many other folklorists.

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