The Social Contract: & Discourses (Google eBook)

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J. M. Dent & sons, Limited, 1920 - Civilization - 287 pages
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Review: The Social Contract

User Review  - Steven PR - Goodreads

This is a must-have for anyone interested in learning about political philosophy. Rousseau's book seems to stand on opposite ends of Locke's Two Treatises on Government. Whereas Rousseau outlines his ... Read full review

Review: The Social Contract

User Review  - Alex Kartelias - Goodreads

It seems reading this that most of what has supposedly influenced the French revolution is only generalized interpretations taken out of context by men like Robespierre. Rousseau is not as much of a ... Read full review

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Page ii - WILL BE PLEASED TO SEND FREELY TO ALL APPLICANTS A LIST OF THE PUBLISHED AND PROJECTED VOLUMES TO BE COMPRISED UNDER THE FOLLOWING TWELVE HEADINGS: TRAVEL ^ SCIENCE ? FICTION THEOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY HISTORY -$ CLASSICAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE ESSAYS ^ ORATORY POETRY & DRAMA BIOGRAPHY ROMANCE IN TWO STYLES OF BINDING, CLOTH, FLAT BACK, COLOURED TOP, AND LEATHER, ROUND CORNERS, GILT TOP.
Page 35 - He who dares to undertake the making of a people's institutions ought to feel himself capable, so to speak, of changing human nature, of transforming each individual, who is by himself a complete and solitary whole, into part of ' a greater whole from which he in a manner receives his life and being...
Page ii - TRAVEL ? SCIENCE * FICTION THEOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY HISTORY * CLASSICAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE ESSAYS * ORATORY POETRY & DRAMA BIOGRAPHY REFERENCE ROMANCE THE ORDINARY EDITION IS BOUND IN CLOTH WITH GILT DESIGN AND COLOURED TOP.
Page 18 - ... whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be compelled to do so by the whole body. This means nothing less than that he will be forced to be free; for this is the condition which, by giving each citizen to his country, secures him against all personal dependence.
Page 25 - There is often a great deal of difference between the will of all and the general will ; the latter considers only the common interest, while the former takes private interest into account, and is no more than a sum of particular wills...
Page 253 - The body politic, therefore, is also a moral being possessed of a will; and this general will, which tends always to the preservation and welfare of the whole and of every part, and is the source of the laws, constitutes for all the members of the State, in their relations to one another and to it, the rule of what is just or unjust.
Page 94 - When in the popular assembly a law is proposed, what the people is asked is not exactly whether it approves or rejects the proposal, but whether it is in conformity with the general will, which is their will.
Page 11 - God, are abuses of feudalism, in itself an absurd system if ever there was one, and contrary to the principles of natural right and to all good polity. War then is a relation, not between man and man, but between State and State, and individuals are enemies only accidentally, not as men, nor even as citizens,1 but as soldiers; not as members of their country, but as its defenders.
Page 8 - The Right of the Strongest The strongest is never strong enough to be always the master, unless he transforms strength into right, and obedience into duty.
Page 45 - I have already defined civil liberty by equality, we should understand, not that the degrees of power and riches are to be absolutely identical for everybody; but that power shall never be great enough for violence, and shall always be exercised by virtue of rank and law; and that, in respect of riches, no citizen shall ever be wealthy enough to buy another, and none poor enough to be forced to sell himself...

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