The interest of Great Britain respecting the French war (Google eBook)

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J. Ridgway, 1793 - France - 19 pages
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Page 6 - And thus that which begins and actually constitutes any political society is nothing but the consent of any number of freemen capable of a majority to unite and incorporate into such a society. And this is that, and that only, which did or could give beginning to any lawful government in the world.
Page 6 - Society, is nothing but the confent of a number of free men, capable of a majo. rity to unite, and incorporate into fuch fociety ; and this is that and that only, which did, or could give beginning to any lawful government. The fiipreme...
Page 15 - ... evidence to prove, that either hatred to Kings, or the offer of confraternity, would have refulted from their principles ; any more than from the principles of any other republic, or even ihan from the principles of our revolution.
Page 6 - ... nothing but the confent of a number of free men, capable of a majority to unite, and incorporate into fuch fociety ; and this is that and that only, which did, or could give beginning to any lawful government. The fiipreme power cannot lawfully or rightly take from шап any part of his property without his own confent.
Page 6 - IfgifJative, when they find the legiflative afl contrary to the truftrepoftd' in them ; for when fuch truft is abufed, it is thereby forfeited, and devolves to thofe who gave it.
Page 15 - DO part of thofe principles; it fprang from the hatred Kings have manifefted to their government. The offer of confraternity was adopted, to counteract the univerfal confederation they faw formed...
Page 15 - ... be told, that the circumftances attending a revolution, are not its principles, and frequently not the rejult of the principles.

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