Complete Saki

Front Cover
Penguin, 1976 - Fiction - 944 pages
4 Reviews
Saki (Hector Hugo Munroe) is perhaps the most graceful spokesman for England's golden afternoon - the slow and peaceful years before World War I. This volume contains the whole of Saki's work - all the short stories, his three novels and three plays.
  

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I discovered Saki in the sixth grade. He continues to be a touchstone throughout my life. Witty, ironic, sarcastic - a poignant satirist of pre-WWI British malaise. But he conveys a sentimentality over his characters that even the most flawed are somewhat sympathetic. Truly a delightful read.

Contents

III
5
IV
8
V
10
VI
12
VII
14
VIII
16
IX
18
X
20
LXXVIII
297
LXXIX
301
LXXX
306
LXXXI
310
LXXXII
315
LXXXIII
319
LXXXIV
322
LXXXV
326

XI
22
XII
26
XIII
28
XIV
30
XV
32
XVI
35
XVII
38
XVIII
41
XIX
43
XX
46
XXI
49
XXII
54
XXIII
56
XXIV
60
XXV
61
XXVI
63
XXVII
69
XXVIII
72
XXIX
76
XXX
80
XXXI
84
XXXII
90
XXXIII
94
XXXIV
99
XXXV
101
XXXVI
106
XXXVII
108
XXXVIII
115
XXXIX
118
XL
121
XLI
124
XLII
127
XLIII
133
XLIV
136
XLV
140
XLVI
144
XLVII
147
XLVIII
152
XLIX
154
L
158
LI
161
LII
166
LIII
173
LIV
179
LV
184
LVI
190
LVII
193
LVIII
199
LIX
203
LX
207
LXI
214
LXII
224
LXIII
233
LXIV
235
LXV
241
LXVI
245
LXVII
250
LXVIII
254
LXIX
259
LXX
262
LXXI
266
LXXII
271
LXXIII
275
LXXIV
279
LXXV
283
LXXVI
287
LXXVII
293
LXXXVI
329
LXXXVII
333
LXXXVIII
337
LXXXIX
339
XC
344
XCI
349
XCII
354
XCIII
358
XCIV
363
XCV
366
XCVI
371
XCVII
377
XCVIII
381
XCIX
385
C
391
CI
393
CII
398
CIII
402
CIV
405
CV
410
CVI
414
CVII
418
CVIII
422
CIX
427
CX
431
CXI
436
CXII
441
CXIII
447
CXIV
452
CXV
457
CXVI
461
CXVII
465
CXVIII
470
CXIX
474
CXX
479
CXXI
483
CXXII
487
CXXIII
491
CXXIV
495
CXXV
500
CXXVI
505
CXXVII
508
CXXVIII
513
CXXIX
518
CXXX
523
CXXXI
525
CXXXII
528
CXXXIII
532
CXXXIV
537
CXXXV
539
CXXXVI
545
CXXXVII
548
CXXXVIII
551
CXXXIX
554
CXL
556
CXLI
559
CXLII
560
CXLIII
565
CXLIV
567
CXLV
689
CXLVI
815
CXLVII
841
CXLVIII
843
CXLIX
851
CL
863
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About the author (1976)

H. H. Munro, better known as "Saki," was born in Burma, the son of an inspector-general for the Burmese police. Sent to England to be educated at the Bedford Grammar School, he returned to Burma in 1893 and joined the police force there. In 1896, he returned again to England and began writing first for The Westminster Gazette and then as a foreign correspondent for The Morning Post. Best known for his wry and amusing stories, Saki depicts a world of drawing rooms, garden parties, and exclusive club rooms. His short stories at their best are extraordinarily compact and cameolike, wicked and witty, with a careless cruelty and a powerful vein of supernatural fantasy. They deal, in general, with the same group of upper-class Britishers, whose frivolous lives are sometimes complicated by animals---the talking cat who reveals their treacheries in love, the pet ferret who is evil incarnate. The nom de plume "Saki" was borrowed from the cupbearer in Omar Khayyam's (see Vol. 2) The Rubaiyat. Munro used it for political sketches contributed to the Westminster Gazette as early as 1896, later collected as Alice in Westminster. The stories and novels were published between that time and the outbreak of World War I, when he enlisted as a private, scorning a commission. He died of wounds from a sniper's bullet while in a shell hole near Beaumont-Hamel. One of his characters summed up Saki's stories as those that "are true enough to be interesting and not true enough to be tiresome.

Bibliographic information