The Life of Samuel Johnson: Comprehending an Account of His Studies and Numerous Works in Chronological Order : a Series of His Epistolary Correspondence and Conversations with Many Eminent Persons : and Various Original Pieces of His Composition, Never Before Published, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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T. Cadell, 1822 - Authors, English
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Page 412 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuff 'd bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ? Doct.
Page 426 - Wealth, my lad, was made to wander, Let it wander as it will ; Call the jockey, call the pander, Bid them come and take their fill. When the bonny blade carouses, Pockets full, and spirits high, What are acres ? what are houses ? Only dirt, or wet or dry. Should the guardian friend or mother Tell the woes of wilful waste ; Scorn their counsels, scorn their pother, You can hang or drown at last.
Page 27 - No man was more foolish when he had not a pen in his hand, or more wise when he had.
Page 106 - We can do nothing without the blue stockings ; ' and thus by degrees the title was established.
Page 139 - The power of art without the show. In misery's darkest caverns known, His useful care was ever nigh, Where hopeless anguish pour'd his groan, And lonely want retir'd to die.
Page 42 - ... felt; and produced sentiments not such as Nature enforces, but meditation supplies. With the simple and elemental passions as they spring separate in the mind, he seems not much acquainted. He is, therefore, with all his variety of excellence, not often pathetick; and had so little sensibility of the power of effusions purely natural, that he did not esteem them in others.
Page 287 - I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called, with all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love ; endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.
Page 92 - And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom ; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept arose, and came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many.
Page 95 - Biron they call him; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest ; Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor,) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
Page 19 - I would put a child into a library (where no unfit books are) and let him read at his choice. A child should not be discouraged from reading anything that he takes a liking to, from a notion that it is above his reach. If that be the case, the child will soon find it out and desist ; if not, he of course gains the instruction ; which is so much the more likely to come, from the inclination with which he takes up the study.

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