The National Preceptor: Or, Selections in Prose and Poetry; Consisting of Narrative, Descriptive, Argumentative, Didactic, Pathetic, and Humorous Pieces ... (Google eBook)

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Goodwin and Robinson & Pratt, 1838 - Readers - 336 pages
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Contents

The Two Bees Dodsley
55
Heroism of a Peasant
56
Biographical Sketch of Major Andre
57
The Miraclea German Parable
60
The Compassionate Judge
61
The Prudent Judgean Eastern Tale Mass Magazine
62
The Fox and the Cat
64
Might makes Right 65
65
Lion and Dog
66
The Gentleman and his Tenant
73
Dishonesty Punished Kanes Bints
74
Socrates and Leander
76
The Dead Horse Sterne
77
Biographical Anecdotes 79
79
The Revenge of a Great Soul
80
Death of Prince William Goldsmith
81
He never smiled again Mrs Hemans
82
The Shepherd and the Philosopher
83
The Youth and the Philosopher Whitehead
85
Naval Action
86
Damon and Pythias
90
Test of Goodness
92
The Mysterious Stranger Jane Taylor
93
Earthquake in Calabria Goldsmith
98
The Wild Boy Charles W Thompson
99
The Starling Sterne
100
Alcander and Septimius Goldsmith
102
IngratitudeStory of Inkle and Yarico
104
The Battle of Blenheim Southey
106
The Dog and the Fox Gay
108
The Hare and the Tortoise Lloyd
109
The Painter who pleased Nobody and Every Body Gay
110
Story of the Siege of Calais
112
Examples of Decision of Character John Foster
116
or the Vanity of Riches Dr Johnson
118
Schemes of Life often Illusory Dr Johnson
121
The Hill of Science Aikin
123
The Vision of Mirza Spectator
126
The Chameleon Merrick
130
The Country Bumpkin and Razor Seller P Pindar
132
The Gascon Peasant and the Flies
134
The Progress of Untruth Byrom
136
The Voyage of Life Dr Johnson
137
The Journey of a Daya picture of human life Dr Johnson
140
The Mummy Smith
143
The Negros Complaint Cowper
145
Victory
147
Destruction of Jerusalem
148
Destruction of Jerusalemconcluded t
152
The Warriors Wreath 156
156
Address to the Sun Ossian
160
The African Chief U S Literary Gazette
161
Formation of Character J Haioes D D
162
On Happiness of Temper Goldsmith
164
The Sleepers Miss M A Browne
167
A Good Scholar May
168
Select Sentences
170
Select Paragraphs
173
Happiness is founded in rectitude of conduct Harris
177
Virtue and Piety mans highest interest Harris
178
Importance of Virtue Price
179
On the Irresolution of Youth Goldsmith
190
The Hero and the Sage
193
The Blind Preacher Wirt
194
Specimen of Welch Preaching London Jewish Expositor
196
Happiness Lacon
199
The Philosophers Scales J Taylor
205
Goody Blake and Harry Gill Wordsworth
208
The Three Warnings Mrs ThraU
211
The Dervis and the Two Merchants Lacon
214
On the Present and Future State Addison
215
My Mothers Picture Cowper
218
Ode to Disappointment Henry Kirke White
219
HI What is Time Marsden
220
Casabianca Mrs Remans 323
222
The Just Judge
223
On Happiness Sterne
226
Diversity in the Human Character Pope
247
On the Pursuits of Mankind Pope
249
The Road to Happiness open to all Men Pope
251
Providence Vindicated in the Present State of Man Pope
252
The Hermit Beattit
256
The Marriners Dream Dimond
258
Alexander Selkirk Cowper
259
The Hermit ParneU
261
Stanzas addressed to the Greeks
272
Song of the Greeks 1822 Campbell
273
Warrens Address to the American Soldiers Pierpont
275
On the Existence of a Deity Young
283
Tomorrow Cotton
284
Vanity of Power and Misery of Kings Shakspeare
285
Darkness Byron
286
Cassius instigating Brutus Tragedy of Julius Cesar
291
Antonys Speech over the Body of Cesar Shakspeare
294
Othellos Apology for his Marriage Tragedy of Othello
296
Soliloquy of Hamlet on Death Tragedy of Hamlet
298
Catos Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul Trag of Cato
299
Speech of Catiline before the Roman Senate Crolys Catiline
300
The Rich Man and the Poor Man Khemnitzer
301
Address to the Ocean Byron
302
Wisdom Pollok
304
The Inhumanity of Slavery Cowper
305
The Cuckoo Logan
306
The Star of Bethlehem J G Percival
307
The Last Man Campbell
308
Picture of a Good Man Young
310
Hymn on a Review of the Seasons Thomson
311
Cluestions and Answers Montgomery
313
On the death of Mrs Mason Mason
314
Ode from the 19th Psalm Addison
315
Rest in Heaven 316
316
Address to Time Lord Byron
317
Absalom Willis
319
The Miami Mounds 8 L Fairfield
322
On Time H K White
323
Jugurtha in Prison Rev C Wolfe
325
Rienzis Address to the Romans Miss Mitford
328
Battle of Waterloo Lord Byron
330
Power of Eloquence Cary
331
Death of Marco Bozzaris Halleck
333
Dream of Clarence Shakspeare 335
335
William Tell Knowles 201
341

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Page 156 - The struggling pangs of conscious Truth to hide, To quench the blushes of ingenuous Shame, Or heap the shrine of Luxury and Pride With incense kindled at the Muse's flame.
Page 297 - IT must be so — Plato, thou reason'st well ! — Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Page 280 - Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us.
Page 158 - One morn I missed him on the customed hill, Along the heath and near his favorite tree; Another came; nor yet beside the rill, Nor up the lawn, nor at the wood was he; "The next with dirges due in sad array Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne. Approach and read (for thou canst read) the lay, Graved on the stone beneath yon aged thorn.
Page 328 - twas but the wind, Or the car rattling o'er the stony street; On with the dance! let joy be unconfined; No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the glowing Hours with flying feet.— But hark!
Page 328 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed, The mustering squadron, and the clattering car, Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war...
Page 301 - Thy waters wasted them while they were free, And many a tyrant since; their shores obey The stranger, slave, or savage; their decay Has dried up realms to deserts: — not so thou, Unchangeable save to thy wild waves' play — Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow — Such as creation's dawn beheld thou rollest now.
Page 294 - O, now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel The dint of pity : these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what ! weep you, when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors.
Page 303 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then, And let it circulate through every vein Of all your empire ; that, where Britain's power Is felt, mankind may feel her mercy too.
Page 258 - Ye winds, that have made me your sport, Convey to this desolate shore Some cordial endearing report Of a land I shall visit no more. My friends , — do they now and then send A wish or a thought after me? O tell me I yet have a friend, Though a friend I am never to see.

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