The Literary magnet of the belles lettres, science, and the fine arts, ed. by Tobias Merton. Vol.1 - new ser., vol.[2. Vol.2 of the new ser. wants all after p.192]. (Google eBook)

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Tobias Merton (pseud)
1825
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Page 68 - To a poet nothing can be useless. Whatever is beautiful, and whatever is dreadful, must be familiar to his imagination : he must be conversant with all that is awfully vast or elegantly little.
Page 67 - Oft she rejects, but never once offends. Bright as the sun, her eyes the gazers strike, And, like the sun, they shine on all alike. Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride, Might hide her faults, if belles had faults to hide : If to her share some female errors fall, Look on her face, and you'll forget 'em all. This nymph, to the destruction of mankind, Nourished two locks, which graceful hung behind In equal curls, and well conspired to deck With shining ringlets the smooth iv'ry neck.
Page 67 - Her lips were red, her looks were free, Her locks were yellow as gold: Her skin was as white as leprosy, The Night-mare LIFE-IN-DEATH was she, Who thicks man's blood with cold. The naked hulk alongside came, And the twain were casting dice; "The game is done! I've won! I've won!
Page 68 - He must write as the interpreter of nature, and the legislator of mankind, and consider himself as presiding over the thoughts and manners of future generations ; as a being superior to time and place.
Page 153 - Spirit of Nature ! here In this interminable wilderness Of worlds, at whose immensity Even soaring fancy staggers, Here is thy fitting temple ! Yet not the lightest leaf That quivers to the passing breeze Is less instinct with thee ; Yet not the meanest worm That lurks in graves and fattens on the dead, Less shares thy eternal breath ! Spirit of Nature ! thou, Imperishable as this scene Here is thy fitting temple...
Page 183 - They are true to the last of their blood and their breath, And like reapers descend to the harvest of death. Then welcome be Cumberland's steed to the shock ! Let him dash his proud foam like a wave on the rock! But woe to his kindred, and woe to his cause, When Albin her claymore indignantly draws...
Page 68 - The plants of the garden, the animals of the wood, the minerals of the earth, and meteors of the sky, must all concur to store his mind with inexhaustible variety : for every idea is useful for the enforcement or decoration of moral or religious truth ; and he who knows most, will have most power of diversifying his scenes, and of gratifying his reader with remote allusions and unexpected instruction. All the appearances of nature I was therefore careful to study, and every country which I have surveyed...
Page 155 - WHEN first I met thee, warm and young, There shone such truth about thee, And on thy lip such promise hung, I did not dare to doubt thee. I saw thee change, yet still relied, Still clung with hope the fonder, And thought, though false to all beside, From me thou couldst not wander. , But go, deceiver ! go, The heart, whose hopes could make it Trust one so false, so low, Deserves that thou shouldst break it.
Page 115 - To whom belongs this Valley fair, That sleeps beneath the filmy air, Even like a living Thing ? Silent as Infant at the breast Save a still sound that speaks of rest, That streamlet's murmuring.
Page 79 - The merchant ships, as well as the menof-war, consisting, at that time, of the Esmeralda, a large 40 gun frigate, and two sloops of war, were moored under the guns of the castle within a semicircle of fourteen gunboats, and a boom made of spars chained together.

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