Essays on the Anatomy and Philosophy of Expression (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1824 - Anatomy, Artistic - 218 pages
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Page 84 - Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me ; Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form ; Then, have I reason to be fond of grief.
Page 124 - Saying, Let us alone; what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God. 25 And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold thy peace, and come out of him.
Page 111 - Down dropt, and all the faded roses shed : Speechless he stood and pale, till thus at length First to himself he inward silence broke.
Page 28 - On Parent knees, a naked new-born child Weeping thou sat'st while all around thee smil'd ; So live, that sinking in thy last long sleep, Thou then may'st smile, while all around thee weep.
Page 157 - ... or it may be compared to pendulums vibrating in different directions over one central point, and as they all cross the centre, though only one passes through any other point, so it will be found that perfect beauty is oftener produced by nature than deformity ; I do not mean than deformity in general, but than any one kind of deformity.
Page 110 - Disordred hong about his shoulders round, And hid his face; through which his hollow eyne Lookt deadly dull, and stared as astound; His raw-bone cheekes through penurie and pine, Were shronke into his jawes, as he did never dine. His garment nought but many ragged clouts, With thornes together pind and patched was, The which his naked sides he wrapt abouts...
Page 111 - Dawson says) whose sense* had been numbed with misery. When all was lost, he fixed his eyes upon the ground, and stood some time, with folded arms, stupid, and motionless; then snatching his sword, that hung against the wainscot, he sat him down, and, with a look of fixed attention, drew figures on the floor.
Page v - BY GEORGE JOSEPH BELL, ESQ., ADVOCATE, PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF SCOTLAND IN THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH.
Page 157 - Every species of the animal as well as the vegetable creation may be said to have a fixed or determinate form, towards which Nature is continually inclining, like various lines terminating in the centre ; or it may be compared to pendulums vibrating in different directions over one central point : and as they all cross the centre, though only one passes through any other point, so it will be found that perfect beauty is oftener produced by Nature than deformity...
Page 122 - His burning eyen, whom bloody streaks did stain, Stared full wide, and threw forth sparks of fire ; And, more for rank despite than for great pain, Shaked2 his long locks, colour'd like copper wire, And bit his tawny beard to show his raging ire.

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