Commerical Fishing: The Wider Ecological Impacts

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G. Moore, Simon Jennings, British Ecological Society
Wiley, May 18, 2000 - Law - 66 pages
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Fishing provides food, income and employment for millions of people. However, fishing has environmental costs that threaten rare species, marine ecosystems and the sustainability of the resource.

Based on the research expertise of leading scientists, Commercial Fishing: the Wider Ecological Impacts provides a lively, timely and accessible account of fishing activities and their impacts on marine habitats, biodiversity and species of conservation concern. It covers fishing methods that range from trawling in the Antarctic to fishing with dynamite in the tropics.

The authors show how habitats such as the muddy sea beds of the deep sea, kelp forests and coral reefs are affected by fishing and how birds, mammals, turtles and sea snakes both suffer and benefit from fishing activities. They also look to the future, highlighting ways to make fishing gear 'environmentally friendly' and asking whether marine reserves will improve conservation.

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About the author (2000)

Geoff Moore, before his untimely death in July 2001, Geoff Moore was a Senior Associate Consultant at Gas Strategies, working on gas trading operations and the progress of liberalisation in Europe. He worked in the UK gas industry for most of his employed life, always at the 'sharp end', dealing with UK gas supply contracts, foreign trade and major political issues. He spent many years in a senior role at British Gas analysing and negotiating gas purchase agreements. In recent years he was closely involved with the UK-Continent Interconnector pipeline and developments in the competitive gas market in both the UK and North America. He spent a year with Natural Gas Clearinghouse (NGCH) in Houston before joining Accord Energy Ltd (a major market maker in spot gas) in the UK.

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