An Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of James I. and Charles I. and of the Lives of Oliver Cromwell and Charles II...: From Original Writers and State-papers, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Printed for F.C. and J. Rivington, 1814
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Page 7 - I had the opportunity of being acquainted with divers worthy persons, inquisitive into natural philosophy, and other parts of human learning ; and particularly of what hath been called the New Philosophy, or Experimental Philosophy...
Page 246 - There is written on the turrets of the city of Lucca in great characters at this day, the word libertas; yet no man can thence infer that a particular man has more liberty or immunity from the service of the commonwealth there than in Constantinople. Whether a commonwealth be monarchical or popular, the freedom is still the same.
Page 157 - I do solemnly and sincerely in the presence of God, profess, testify, and declare that I do make this declaration, and every part thereof, in the plain and ordinary sense of the words read unto me as they are commonly understood by Protestants, without any evasion, equivocation, or mental reservation whatsoever...
Page 256 - Less than archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured ; as when the sun, new risen, Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams, or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Page 158 - ... the Pope or any other authority or person whatsoever, or without any hope of any such dispensation from any person or authority whatsoever, or without thinking that I am or can be acquitted before God or man or absolved of this declaration or any part thereof, although the Pope or any other person or persons or power whatsoever should dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.
Page 247 - Politiques (iib. vi. cap. 2.) in democracy liberty is to be supposed : for it is commonly held, that no man is free in any other government. And as Aristotle, so Cicero and other writers have grounded their civil doctrine on the opinions of the Romans, who were taught to hate monarchy, at first, by them that, having deposed their sovereign, shared amongst them the sovereignty of Rome ; and afterwards by their successors.
Page 84 - I, AB do declare that it is not lawful, upon any pretence whatsoever, to take arms against the king; and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person or against those that are commissionated by him; and that I will conform to the liturgy of the Church of England, as it is now by law established...
Page 157 - I, AB, do solemnly and sincerely, in the presence of God, profess, testify and declare that I do believe that in the sacrament of the Lord's Supper there is not any transubstantiation of the elements of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ at or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever; and that the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary or any other saint, and the sacrifice of the mass as they are now used in the Church of Rome, are superstitious and idolatrous.
Page 123 - ... as may enable us to exercise, with a more universal satisfaction, that power of dispensing, which we conceive to be inherent in us.
Page 38 - She was a woman of great beauty, but most enormously vicious and ravenous ; foolish but imperious, very uneasy to the king, and always carrying on intrigues with other men, while yet she pretended she was jealous of him. His passion for her, and her strange behaviour towards him, did so disorder him, that often he was not master of himself, nor capable of minding business, which, in so critical a time, required great application...

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