Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and why They Do it

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Basic Books, 2000 - Political Science - 433 pages
13 Reviews
A leading expert explains what government bureaucracies do and why they behave the way they do."Wilson is a remarkably clear thinker. It is unlikely that anyone in the foreseeable future will master so much research about so many agencies at government level."--Tom Peters, "The Washingtonian"

"Wilson is our Weber and this is his "summa ."..a sprightly, irreverent, and profoundly serious inquiry as to how you make a nation work."--Daniel Patrick Moynihan, U.S. Senator

"The synthesis is shrewd and creative. The prose is uncommonly swift. The fresh insights are abundant and compelling."--Martha Derthick, University of Virginia

"A gold mine of interesting, even unique observations about bureaucratic government on all levels."--R. Cort Kirkwood, "Christian Science Monitor"

"Immediately takes its place as the indispensable one-volume guide to American national administration."--Aaron Wildavsky, "Los Angeles Times Book Review"

  

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Review: Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and Why They Do It

User Review  - Shadow - Goodreads

If you are interested in understanding how the government agencies work, read this book. It is not easy to read, and it is boring. but the probably the best written book on bureaucracy. Read full review

Review: Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and Why They Do It

User Review  - Ross Neely - Goodreads

Q Wilson explains the problems of bureaucracy well. Government agencies face many constraints. Managers spend a great deal of time managing the constraints as opposed to managing the agency. Read full review

Contents

Armies Prisons Schools
3
Organization Matters
14
Circumstances
31
Beliefs
50
Interests
72
Culture
90
Constraints
113
People
137
Congress
235
Presidents
257
Courts
277
National Differences
295
Problems
315
Rules
333
Markets
346
Bureaucracy and the Public Interest
365

Compliance
154
Turf
179
Strategies
196
Innovation
218
NOTES
379
INDEXES
409
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

James Q. Wilson is James Collins professor of management and public policy at UCLA. Winner of the 1990, James Madison Award of the American Political Science Association, he is also the author of Moral Sense and Moral Judgement.

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